Latent TGF-β Hydrogels for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

Authors

  • Elsie S. Place,

    1. Department of Materials, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    2. Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    3. Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK
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  • Rekha Nair,

    1. Department of Materials, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    2. Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    3. Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK
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  • Helena N. Chia,

    1. UCLA Biomedical Engineering IDP, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1600, USA
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  • Greg Szulgit,

    1. Department of Materials, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK
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  • Erh-hsuin Lim,

    1. Department of Materials, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    2. Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK
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  • Molly M. Stevens

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    2. Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    3. Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    • Department of Materials, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK.
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Abstract

original image

A biomimetic delivery strategy for transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is described, in which TGF-β is presented in a latent form (the small latent complex, SLC), which is inactive until modified by the actions of the cells. In this work, SLC is tethered to a hyaluronic acid hydrogel scaffold to enhance in vitro chondrogenesis.

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