Protein-Engineered Biomaterials to Generate Human Skeletal Muscle Mimics

Authors

  • Debanti Sengupta,

    1. Stanford University, Department of Chemistry, 466 Lomita Mall, Moore Building, Room 271, Stanford, CA 94305-4045, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Penney M. Gilbert,

    1. Stanford University, School of Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology, 269 Campus Drive, Clinical Sciences Research Center, Room 3200, Stanford, CA 94305-5175, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kyle J. Johnson,

    1. Stanford University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 466 Lomita Mall, Moore Building, Room 271, Stanford, CA 94305-4045, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Helen M. Blau,

    1. Stanford University, School of Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology, 269 Campus Drive, Clinical Sciences Research Center, Room 4215, Stanford, CA 94305-5175, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sarah C. Heilshorn

    Corresponding author
    1. Stanford University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 476 Lomita Mall, McCullough Building, Room 246, Stanford, CA 94305-4045, USA
    • Stanford University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 476 Lomita Mall, McCullough Building, Room 246, Stanford, CA 94305-4045, USA.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

original image

Protein-engineered biomaterials are designed to enable culture and differentiation of human myoblasts (isolated from skeletal muscle biopsies) into functionally contractile myotubes ex vivo. Individual myoblasts align with microtopographical features (white dashed lines), fuse to form myotubes with several nuclei (blue), and form sarcomeric structures (α-actinin, green) that enable electrical pacing of contractions.

Ancillary