Subtle Changes to Polymer Structure and Degradation Mechanism Enable Highly Effective Nanoparticles for siRNA and DNA Delivery to Human Brain Cancer (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 3/2013)

Authors

  • Stephany Y. Tzeng,

    1. Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Department of Biomedical Engineering, the Wilmer Eye Institute, the Institute for Nanobiotechnology, and the Translational Tissue Engineering Center, 400 N. Broadway, Smith 5017, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA
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  • Jordan J. Green

    Corresponding author
    1. Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Department of Biomedical Engineering, the Wilmer Eye Institute, the Institute for Nanobiotechnology, and the Translational Tissue Engineering Center, 400 N. Broadway, Smith 5017, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA
    • Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Department of Biomedical Engineering, the Wilmer Eye Institute, the Institute for Nanobiotechnology, and the Translational Tissue Engineering Center, 400 N. Broadway, Smith 5017, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA.
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Abstract

original image

Polymeric nanoparticles are engineered to deliver siRNA and DNA to human brain cancer cells, as reported by Jordan J. Green and Stephany Y. Tzeng on page 468. Changes to polymer structure, such as to molecular weight, hydrophobicity, polymer endgroup, and degradable linkages, tune delivery in a manner that is often dependent on the type of nucleic acid cargo being delivered. Hydrolytically degradable polymers effectively deliver DNA whereas bioreducible degrading polymers effectively deliver siRNA.

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