Stimuli-Responsive Materials: The Role of Electrostatics and Temperature on Morphological Transitions of Hydrogel Nanostructures Self-Assembled by Peptide Amphiphiles Via Molecular Dynamics Simulations (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 10/2013)

Authors

  • Iris W. Fu,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California 92697-2575, United States
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  • Cade B. Markegard,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California 92697-2575, United States
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  • Brian K. Chu,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California 92697-2575, United States
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  • Hung D. Nguyen

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California 92697-2575, United States
    • Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California 92697-2575, United States.
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Abstract

original image

Peptide amphiphiles self-assemble into nanostructures as either cylindrical nanofibers or spherical micelles in response to specific physiological stimuli. Such morphological transition is captured by large-scale molecular dynamics simulations in examining spontaneous selfassembly starting from random configurations. On page 1388, the simulation study by Hung D. Nguyen and co-workers can potentially aid the design and development of bio-inspired materials for drug delivery, diagnostic medicine, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine.

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