Stem Cells: Nanoscale Topography and Chemistry Affect Embryonic Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Early Differentiation (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 12/2013)

Authors

  • Vanessa L. S. LaPointe,

    1. National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, TW11 0LW United Kingdom
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  • Ana Tiago Fernandes,

    1. National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, TW11 0LW United Kingdom
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  • Nia C. Bell,

    1. National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, TW11 0LW United Kingdom
    2. Institute of Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Switzerland
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  • Francesco Stellacci,

    1. Departments of Materials and Bioengineering and the Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ United Kingdom
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  • Molly M. Stevens

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Materials and Bioengineering and the Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Imperial College London, Royal School of Mines, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ United Kingdom
    • Departments of Materials and Bioengineering and the Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Imperial College London, Royal School of Mines, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ United Kingdom.

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Abstract

original image

On page 1644, Molly M. Stevens and team show how embryonic stem cells can sense nanoscale topography and chemistry from surfaces composed of 4.5 nm gold monolayer-protected metal nanoparticles with varying shell composition. Early differentiation markers are influenced by both variables, suggesting a synergistic role for topographical features and surface chemistry in influencing stem cell behavior.

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