You have free access to this content

Advanced Healthcare Materials

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 1

January 11, 2012

Volume 1, Issue 1

Pages 1–127

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Progress Report
    11. Reviews
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    14. Full Paper
    1. You have free access to this content
      Particle Geometry and Mechanics in Biomedical Applications: The Role of Particle Geometry and Mechanics in the Biological Domain (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 1/2012) (page 1)

      James P. Best, Yan Yan and Frank Caruso

      Version of Record online: 3 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290003

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Soft rod-like polymer particles flowing through a blood vessel are presented by Frank Caruso and co-workers on page 35. The geometry and mechanics of particles influence biological interactions and mechanisms. In the cover image, particles with three different lengths are shown.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Progress Report
    11. Reviews
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    14. Full Paper
    1. You have free access to this content
      Nanofibers in Regenerative Medicine: Electrospun Nanofibers for Regenerative Medicine (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 1/2012) (page 2)

      Wenying Liu, Stavros Thomopoulos and Younan Xia

      Version of Record online: 3 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290004

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recent progress in applying electrospun nanofibers to regenerative medicine is reviewed by Younan Xia and co-workers on page 10. Following a brief introduction to electrospinning, they discuss how scaffolds are fabricated from electrospun nanofibers with well-controlled compositions, structures, and alignments. Applications of the scaffolds in four specific areas are highlighted: nerves, dural tissues, tendons, and the tendon-to-bone insertion site.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Progress Report
    11. Reviews
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    14. Full Paper
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cancer Therapy: Cooperative, Nanoparticle-Enabled Thermal Therapy of Breast Cancer (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 1/2012) (page 128)

      Haifa Shen, Jian You, Guodong Zhang, Arturas Ziemys, Qingpo Li, Litao Bai, Xiaoyong Deng, Donald R. Erm, Xuewu Liu, Chun Li and Mauro Ferrari

      Version of Record online: 3 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290005

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An efficient thermal ablation agent was developed by confining gold nanoshells into nanopores of silicon microparticles. On page 84, Mauro Ferrari and co-workers show how near-infrared laser light triggers enhanced heat generation of gold nanoshells, by exploiting nanoscale cooperative effects inside microparticles. A multifold increase in thermal therapy efficacy was achieved for breast cancer in cell culture and in animal tumor models.

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Progress Report
    11. Reviews
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    14. Full Paper
    1. You have free access to this content
      Masthead: (Advanced Healthcare Materials 1/2012)

      Version of Record online: 3 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290006

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Progress Report
    11. Reviews
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    14. Full Paper
    1. You have free access to this content
  6. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Progress Report
    11. Reviews
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    14. Full Paper
    1. You have free access to this content
  7. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Progress Report
    11. Reviews
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    14. Full Paper
    1. You have free access to this content
      Electrospun Nanofibers for Regenerative Medicine (pages 10–25)

      Wenying Liu, Stavros Thomopoulos and Younan Xia

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100021

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This Progress Report reviews recent progress in applying electrospun nanofibers to the emerging field of regenerative medicine. Following a brief introduction to electrospinning, it discusses how scaffolds are fabricated from electrospun nanofibers with well-controlled compositions, structures, and alignments. It then highlights applications of the nanofiber-based scaffolds in four specific areas that involve nerves, dural tissues, tendons, and the tendon-to-bone insertion site, respectively.

  8. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Progress Report
    11. Reviews
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    14. Full Paper
    1. You have free access to this content
      Regenerative Medicine: Bio-electrospraying and Cell Electrospinning: Progress and Opportunities for Basic Biology and Clinical Sciences (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 1/2012) (page 26)

      Denis Poncelet, Paul de Vos, Nicolai Suter and Suwan N. Jayasinghe

      Version of Record online: 3 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290000

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bio-electrosprays and cell electrospinning have recently been shown benign for directly handling living cells and whole organisms in both in vitro and in vivo testing. In their Progress Report on page 27, Suwan N. Jayasinghe and coworkers review these approaches, which are the subjects of pre-clinical studies that validate new technologies on model organisms such as Xenopus tropicalis, shown in the image. (Image credits: T. J. Geach, L. B. Zimmerman, and S. N. Jayasinghe.)

  9. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Progress Report
    11. Reviews
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    14. Full Paper
    1. You have free access to this content
      Bio-electrospraying and Cell Electrospinning: Progress and Opportunities for Basic Biology and Clinical Sciences (pages 27–34)

      Denis Poncelet, Paul de Vos, Nicolai Suter and Suwan N. Jayasinghe

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100001

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bio-electrosprays and cell electrospinning have recently been shown benign for directly handling living cells and whole organisms in both in vitro and in vivo testing. These biotechnologies are currently undergoing preclinical studies towards their utility in basic biology and the clinical sciences.

  10. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Progress Report
    11. Reviews
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    14. Full Paper
    1. You have free access to this content
      The Role of Particle Geometry and Mechanics in the Biological Domain (pages 35–47)

      James P. Best, Yan Yan and Frank Caruso

      Version of Record online: 14 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100012

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The effect of particulate physical properties on biological processes is a burgeoning research field. In this Review, the influence of geometry and mechanics on movement under flow conditions, biocirculation, and cellular adhesion and uptake are discussed. An emphasis is placed on the ultimate use of particles in biomedical applications.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Stimuli-Sensitive Synthetic Polypeptide-Based Materials for Drug and Gene Delivery (pages 48–78)

      Chaoliang He, Xiuli Zhuang, Zhaohui Tang, Huayu Tian and Xuesi Chen

      Version of Record online: 5 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100008

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stimuli-sensitive polypeptide-based materials have recently received extensive attention. Polymeric materials, including micelles, vesicles, nanogels, and hydrogels, have been developed based on polypeptides with various structures and compositions. This Review focuses on recent intelligent polypeptide-based materials that have been designed and tested for controlled-delivery applications. In addition, the recent preparation of functionalized polypeptides is discussed.

  11. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Progress Report
    11. Reviews
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    14. Full Paper
    1. You have free access to this content
      Microreactors: Liquid Marbles as Micro-bioreactors for Rapid Blood Typing (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 1/2012) (page 79)

      Tina Arbatan, Lizi Li, Junfei Tian and Wei Shen

      Version of Record online: 3 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290002

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The use of liquid marbles as micro-bioreactors for blood typing assays inside liquid marbles is explored by Wei Shen and co-workers on page 80. The haemagglutination reaction is initiated by injecting the relevant antibody into a marble of a blood sample. The reaction is signified by the separation of agglutinated red blood cells to the lower part of the marble, which leads to applications in ABO and Rh Blood typing.

  12. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Progress Report
    11. Reviews
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    14. Full Paper
    1. You have free access to this content
      Liquid Marbles as Micro-bioreactors for Rapid Blood Typing (pages 80–83)

      Tina Arbatan, Lizi Li, Junfei Tian and Wei Shen

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100016

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A liquid marble micro- bioreactor is used to conduct blood typing as a typical biological assay. This study portrays the potential of using such microreactors for biochemical and biological analysis.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Cooperative, Nanoparticle-Enabled Thermal Therapy of Breast Cancer (pages 84–89)

      Haifa Shen, Jian You, Guodong Zhang, Arturas Ziemys, Qingpo Li, Litao Bai, Xiaoyong Deng, Donald R. Erm, Xuewu Liu, Chun Li and Mauro Ferrari

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100005

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hollow gold nanoshells are more efficient in heat generation triggered by near infrared laser when they are loaded into porous silicon particles, which results in effective cancer-cell killing in vitro and in vivo. Collective electromagnetic coupling of nanoconfined hollow gold nanoshells leads to dramatic enhancement of thermal ablation.

    3. You have free access to this content
      A Highly Sensitive Gold-Nanoparticle-Based Assay for Acetylcholinesterase in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Transgenic Mice with Alzheimer's Disease (pages 90–95)

      Dingbin Liu, Wenwen Chen, Yue Tian, Sha He, Wenfu Zheng, Jiashu Sun, Zhuo Wang and Xingyu Jiang

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100002

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A highly sensitive, selective, and dual-readout (colorimetric and fluorometric) assay for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) based on Rhodamine B-modified gold nanoparticle is reported. Due to its good sensitivity and selectivity, the assay can be used for monitoring AChE levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of transgenic mice with Alzheimer's disease.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Magnetic Nanocomposite Sol–Gel Systems for Remote Controlled Drug Release (pages 96–100)

      Ashley M. Hawkins, Chelsie E. Bottom, Zhi Liang, David A. Puleo and J. Zach Hilt

      Version of Record online: 9 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100013

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The remote heating of iron oxide nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field is used to drive a thermoresponsive sol-gel block copolymer, Pluronic® F-127, through the upper phase transition temperature. This phase change triggers an accelerated release rate of a model drug. Actuation and return to baseline levels are demonstrated for multiple AMF doses.

    5. You have free access to this content
      Multicomponent Fibers by Multi-interfacial Polyelectrolyte Complexation (pages 101–105)

      Andrew C. A. Wan, Meng Fatt Leong, Jerry K. C. Toh, Yuangang Zheng and Jackie Y. Ying

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100020

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In multi-interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation (MIPC), fusion of nascent fibers from multiple interfaces brings the interfaces to a point from which a composite fiber is drawn. MIPC applied to two, three, and four polyelectrolyte complex interfaces leads to various patterned multicomponent fibers. Cells encapsulated in these fibers exhibit migration, aggregation and spreading in relation to the initial cell or matrix pattern.

    6. You have free access to this content
      A Novel Microfluidic Approach for Monodispersed Chitosan Microspheres with Controllable Structures (pages 106–111)

      Jian-Hong Xu, Hong Zhao, Wen-Jie Lan and Guang-Sheng Luo

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100014

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel and simple approach to prepare monodispersed chitosan microspheres with relative small size and controlled structures was developed by combining the solidification methods of solvent extraction and chemical crosslinking in a capillary-embedded microfluidic decive. The microspheres with different structures are used in the field of protein drug controlled release and immobilization lipases and they show different release profiles and good stability, respectively.

    7. You have free access to this content
      Anisotropic Collagen Fibrillogenesis Within Microfabricated Scaffolds: Implications For Biomimetic Tissue Engineering (pages 112–116)

      Aurélie Jean and George C. Engelmayr Jr.

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100017

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Anisotropic collagen fibrillogenesis is demonstrated within the pores of an accordion-like honeycomb poly(glycerol sebacate) tissue engineering scaffold. Confocal reflectance microscopy and image analysis demonstrate increased fibril distribution order, fibril density, and alignment in accordion-like honeycomb pores compared with collagen gelled unconstrained. Finite element modeling predicts how collagen gel and scaffold mechanics couple in matching native heart muscle stiffness and anisotropy.

  13. Full Paper

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Progress Report
    11. Reviews
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    14. Full Paper
    1. You have free access to this content
      Reduction of Biofilm Infection Risks and Promotion of Osteointegration for Optimized Surfaces of Titanium Implants (pages 117–127)

      Michael Gasik, Lieve Van Mellaert, Dorothée Pierron, Annabel Braem, Dorien Hofmans, Evelien De Waelheyns, Jozef Anné, Marie-Françoise Harmand and Jozef Vleugels

      Version of Record online: 15 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100006

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In vitro studies of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis proliferation on titanium with different roughness, porosity, topology and hydrophilicity are reported. Materials have been tested for human osteogenic and endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Results indicate the possibility of significanly decreasing the biofilm formation in comparison with non-optimized porous titanium coatings. This presents an opportunity to manufacture implants with intrinsic reduced infection risk, yet without additional use of antibacterial substances.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION