Advanced Healthcare Materials

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 2

March, 2012

Volume 1, Issue 2

Pages 133–238

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Gold Foams for Drug Delivery: Microfabrication-Compatible Nanoporous Gold Foams as Biomaterials for Drug Delivery (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 2/2012) (page 133)

      Erkin Seker, Yevgeny Berdichevsky, Kevin J. Staley and Martin L. Yarmush

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290008

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanoporous gold can be produced by a facile self-assembly process that is compatible with conventional microfabrication techniques. On page 172, Erkin Seker and co-workers demonstrate this material's biocom-patibility and its capability to deliver drugs for modulating cellular response. The cover image, acquired with a high-resolution scanning electron microscope, illustrates an astrocyte latching onto the grooves of a nanoporous gold surface.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Hybrid Microfluidic Systems: Fabrication of a Hybrid Microfluidic System Incorporating both Lithographically Patterned Microchannels and a 3D Fiber-Formed Microfluidic Network (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 2/2012) (page 134)

      Leon M. Bellan, Tatiana Kniazeva, Ernest S. Kim, Alla A. Epshteyn, Donald M. Cropek, Robert Langer and Jeffrey T. Borenstein

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290009

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A device containing a 3D microchannel network (fabricated using sacrificial melt-spun microfibers) sandwiched between lithographically patterned microfluidic channels offers improved delivery of soluble compounds to a large volume compared to a simple stack of two microfluidic channel layers. With this improved delivery ability comes an increased fluidic resistance due to the tortuous network of small-diameter channels, report Leon Bellan and co-workers on 164.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 2/2012)

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290010

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
  5. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. New Biomimetic Directions in Regenerative Ophthalmology (pages 140–148)

      David W. Green, Gregory S. Watson, Jolanta Watson and Samuel J. K. Abraham

      Version of Record online: 15 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100039

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      New biomimetic materials and structures are needed in regenerative ophthalmology to orchestrate ocular tissue repair and reconstruction accurately, rapidly and completely. An alternative biomimicry approach is discussed in this Review, aimed at harnessing structures directly from nature that possess the right sets of features and functions to solve key problems in ophthalmology—such as regrowing retinal pigment epithelium on cicada wing derived nanostructures.

    2. Emerging Technologies for Assembly of Microscale Hydrogels (pages 149–158)

      Umut Atakan Gurkan, Savas Tasoglu, Doga Kavaz, Melik C. Demirel and Utkan Demirci

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200011

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      Assembly of cell encapsulating building blocks, such as microscale hydrogels, has significant applications in areas such as regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, cell-based in vitro assays for pharmaceutical research and drug discovery. In this review, emerging non-invasive assembly methods and recent advancements offering rapid, scalable microgel assembly in 3D are surveyed and future perspectives are provided.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Microencapsulation of Dye- and Drug-Loaded Particles for Imaging and Controlled Release of Multiple Drugs (pages 159–163)

      Yit-Lung Khung, Wei Li Lee, Kit Leong Chui, Yayuan Liu, Ming Pin Lim, Charlotte Liwen Huang and Say Chye Joachim Loo

      Version of Record online: 17 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100007

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A polymeric microcapsule that can house different drug-loaded particles using a simple emulsion packaging technique is presented. Compared to the neat microparticles, microcapsules simultaneously release multiple drugs in a sustained manner. These microcapsules could provide a means of controlling release of multiple drugs.

    2. Fabrication of a Hybrid Microfluidic System Incorporating both Lithographically Patterned Microchannels and a 3D Fiber-Formed Microfluidic Network (pages 164–167)

      Leon M. Bellan, Tatiana Kniazeva, Ernest S. Kim, Alla A. Epshteyn, Donald M. Cropek, Robert Langer and Jeffrey T. Borenstein

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100052

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A device containing a 3D microchannel network (fabricated using sacrificial melt-spun microfibers) sandwiched between lithographically patterned microfluidic channels offers improved delivery of soluble compounds to a large volume compared to a simple stack of two microfluidic channel layers. With this improved delivery ability comes an increased fluidic resistance due to the tortuous network of small-diameter channels.

    3. Magnetic Scaffolds Enriched with Bioactive Nanoparticles for Tissue Engineering (pages 168–171)

      Hadas Skaat, Ofra Ziv-Polat, Abraham Shahar, David Last, Yael Mardor and Shlomo Margel

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100056

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Novel magnetic fibrin hydrogel scaffolds for cell implantation and tissue engineering are reported. The magnetic scaffolds are produced by the interaction between thrombin-conjugated maghemite nanoparticles of narrow size distribution and fibrinogen. These scaffolds, enriched with growth factor conjugated fluorescent maghemite nanoparticles, provide a supporting 3D environment for massive proliferation of various cell types, and can be successfully visualized by MRI.

    4. Microfabrication-Compatible Nanoporous Gold Foams as Biomaterials for Drug Delivery (pages 172–176)

      Erkin Seker, Yevgeny Berdichevsky, Kevin J. Staley and Martin L. Yarmush

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200002

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanoporous gold is a promising material for multi-functional bio-interfaces with its well-characterized surface chemistry, compatibility with conventional micropatterning techniques, electrical conductivity, and high effective surface-area for molecular release. This paper demonstrates its biocompatibility and capability for drug release to modulate cellular response.

    5. Efficient Cell Reprogramming Using Bioengineered Surfaces (pages 177–182)

      David Horna, Juan Carlos Ramírez, Anna Cifuentes, Antonio Bernad, Salvador Borrós and Manuel A. González

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200017

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel method for cell reprogramming is been developed by immobilizing nucleic acid transfer vectors containing free amino groups, like lentiviral particles, onto pentafluorophenyl methacrylate (PFM)-modified surfaces obtained by PFM grafting affter Ar plasma treatment. This technique is able to reprogram murine somatic cells into pluripotent cells at high efficiencies. We call these modified surfaces cell reprogramming surfaces, or CRS.

    6. Enhanced Enzymatic Thermal Stability and Activity in Functionalized Mesoporous Silica Monitored by 31P NMR (pages 183–188)

      Kheireddine El-Boubbou, David A. Schofield and Christopher C. Landry

      Version of Record online: 29 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100024

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) is immobilized on ammonium-modified mesoporous silica particles. Thermal stability and activity are measured with a 31P NMR assay of the conversion of paraoxon (toxic) to its non-toxic hydrolysisproduct. After immobilization, OPH is significantly more active at room temperature and retained activity even after being heated to 45 °C for 1 month.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Reviews
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Uptake and Toxicity Studies of Poly-Acrylic Acid Functionalized Silicon Nanoparticles in Cultured Mammalian Cells (pages 189–198)

      Qi Wang, Yongping Bao, Xiaohong Zhang, Paul R. Coxon, Upali A. Jayasooriya and Yimin Chao

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100010

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      Poly-acrylic acid grafted silicon nanoparticles are bio-compatible and can be suspended in water. No evidence of in vitro cytotoxicity is demonstrated upon exposure of cells to the nanoparticles. When incubated into mammalian cells, the nanoparticles display intense luminescence, and the cellular uptake of the nanoparticles shows a clear time dependence at higher concentrations. This study provides fundamental evidence for safe application of silicon nanoparticles, which could broaden their potential uses as cell markers in living systems and in micelle encapsulated drug-delivery systems.

    2. Carbohydrate Structure Dependent Hemocompatibility of Biomimetic Functional Polymer Brushes on Surfaces (pages 199–213)

      Kai Yu, Benjamin F. L. Lai and Jayachandran N. Kizhakkedathu

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100042

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Glycocalyx mimicking glycopolymer brushes presenting mannose, galactose and glucose units were synthesized on surfaces. The developed surface coatings showed pronounced differences in their blood interaction as function of sugar units present. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that the total protein adsorption from human plasma was greatly reduced to 24.3 ng/cm2 on brushes presenting glucose. Glycopolymer brushes were neutral to surface induced blood coagulation with the glucose brush performing slightly better than the others.

    3. A Strategy in The Design of Micellar Shape for Cancer Therapy (pages 214–224)

      Tao Chen, Xing Guo, Xian Liu, Shuai Shi, Jie Wang, Chunli Shi, Zhiyong Qian and Shaobing Zhou

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100040

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biodegradable poly(ether-anhydrides) micelles with filamentous, rod-like, and spherical shapes are fabricated. Of these shapes, the filamentous micelles, when loaded with doxorubicin hydrochloride, displayed the highest safety to body and the best therapeutic effect to an artificial solid tumor. This shape can therefore be assumed to be the most suitable micelle morphology in the design and engineering of drug vehicle for cancer therapy.

    4. Highly Potent Bactericidal Activity of Porous Metal-Organic Frameworks (pages 225–238)

      Wenjuan Zhuang, Daqiang Yuan, Jian-Rong Li, Zhiping Luo, Hong-Cai Zhou, Sajid Bashir and Jingbo Liu

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100043

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A metal-organic framework, Co-TDM, composed of a unique octa-topic carboxylate ligand and bimeric μ2-H2O-centered basic carboxylate cluster is presented as a new bactericidal material. Electron microscopy analysis indicated the Co-TDM was highly crystalline, displaying distinctive grain boundaries and well-developed reticulates, which allow rapid, potent bacterial inactivation. Rupture of the bacterial membrane is the mechanism of cell death, as determined by EDS elemental mapping. A low MBC (10-15 ppm) and the rapid effectiveness of Co-TDM at inactivating the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli demonstrate a new avenue for MOFs in biomedical applications.

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