Advanced Healthcare Materials

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 3

May, 2012

Volume 1, Issue 3

Pages 241–359

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Reports
    8. Full Papers
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. Targeted Delivery of Protein Toxins: Delivery of Ricin Toxin A-Chain by Peptide-Targeted Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle-Supported Lipid Bilayers (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 3/2012) (page 241)

      Katharine Epler, David Padilla, Genevieve Phillips, Peter Crowder, Robert Castillo, Dan Wilkinson, Brian Wilkinson, Cameron Burgard, Robin Kalinich, Jason Townson, Bryce Chackerian, Cheryl Willman, David Peabody, Walker Wharton, C. Jeffrey Brinker, Carlee Ashley and Eric Carnes

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290013

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mesoporous silica nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers, or “protocells”, are loaded with ricin toxin A-chain (RTA) and targeted to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with a peptide (SP94) that binds to unknown HCC surface antigen(s). RTA-loaded, SP94-targeted protocells are selectively internalized by HCC and release encapsulated RTA upon endosome acid-ification. An endosomolytic peptide (H5WYG), present on the protocell's supported lipid bilayer, disrupts endosomal membranes, releasing RTA into the cytosol of HCC cells. As described by Eric Carnes, Carlee Ashley, and co-workers on page 348, RTA-loaded, SP94-targeted protocells kill HCC at a RTA concentration of 30 pM without affecting the viability of non-cancerous cells. In the cover image, protocells modified with SP94 (red), H5WYG (blue), and PEG (green) are shown interacting with an HCC cell.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Reports
    8. Full Papers
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. Controlled Drug Release: Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle-based H2O2 Responsive Controlled-Release System Used for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 3/2012) (page 242)

      Jie Geng, Meng Li, Li Wu, Cuie Chen and Xiaogang Qu

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290014

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On page 332, Xiaogang Qu and co-workers present a novel strategy for Alzheimer's disease treatment using a H2O2-responsive controlled-release system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles. By taking advantage of the good biocompatibility, cellular uptake properties, and efficient intracellular release of metal chelators, the delivery system is promising for future in vivo biomedical applications.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Reports
    8. Full Papers
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. Photo-induced Drug Delivery: Cascaded Photoinduced Drug Delivery to Cells from Multifunctional Core–Shell Mesoporous Silica (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 3/2012) (page 360)

      Axel Schloßbauer, Anna M. Sauer, Valentina Cauda, Alexandra Schmidt, Hanna Engelke, Ulrich Rothbauer, Kourosh Zolghadr, Heinrich Leonhardt, Christoph Bräuchle and Thomas Bein

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290015

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On page 316, Thomas Bein, Christoph Bräuchle, and co-workers present a drug delivery platform based on colloidal mesoporous silica. In order to provide light-triggered, intracellular drug release, photosensitizers are attached to the particles surface. The light-generated singlet oxygen is used to destroy a supported lipid bilayer and the endosomal membrane in a cascaded manner, leading to the release of bioactive species into the cytosol. Confocal fluorescence microscopy is used to characterize the release processes.

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Reports
    8. Full Papers
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. Masthead: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 3/2012)

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290016

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Reports
    8. Full Papers
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
  6. Progress Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Reports
    8. Full Papers
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. Biomaterials-Based Electronics: Polymers and Interfaces for Biology and Medicine (pages 248–266)

      Meredith Muskovich and Christopher J. Bettinger

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200071

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biomaterials-based electronics is an emerging interdisciplinary research thrust that has the potential to impact how organic electronics interface with biological systems. This progress report summarizes recent work at the intersection of soft matter electronics, biomaterials, and living organisms in the context of both uncovering fundamental biological phenomena and engineering next-generation biomedical technologies.

    2. Materials for Diabetes Therapeutics (pages 267–284)

      Kaitlin M. Bratlie, Roger L. York, Michael A. Invernale, Robert Langer and Daniel G. Anderson

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200037

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      Given the worldwide increase in the prevalence of diabetes, we review therapeutics such as pancreatic islet cell encapsulation methods, biocompatible materials, polymer-based smart materials for controlled insulin release, electrochemical and optical glucose sensing, and closed and open loop approaches for the treatment of diabetic patients. We also discuss the main challenges and future directions for this field.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Reports
    8. Full Papers
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. Mitigation of Staphylococcus aureus-Mediated Surgical Site Infections with IR Photoactivated TiO2 coatings on Ti Implants (pages 285–291)

      Asem Aboelzahab, Abdul-Majeed Azad, Shawn Dolan and Vijay Goel

      Version of Record online: 29 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100032

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      Surgical site infections resulting from Staphylococcus aureus build up in the body may lead to detrimental clinical outcomes. This study demonstrates a pathway of inducing necrosis of Staphylococcus aureus bacterial species. The comparative confocal images taken at the beginning (0 min) and after 30 min show that exposure to IR-photoactivated TiO2 coatings on Ti mesh and plates helps mitigate infection by causing over 90% cell death.

    2. Biodegradable Photo-Crosslinked Polymer Substrates with Concentric Microgrooves for Regulating MC3T3-E1 Cell Behavior (pages 292–301)

      Kan Wang, Lei Cai, Li Zhang, Jingyan Dong and Shanfeng Wang

      Version of Record online: 28 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200030

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biodegradable microgrooved substrates with four groove widths and three groove depths are prepared by replica molding, i.e., photo-crosslinking poly(ϵ-caprolactone) triacrylate (PCLTA) on micro-fabricated silicon wafers with pre-designed concentric groove patterns. Mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell behavior and gene expression are regulated on these substrates made from two photo-crosslinked PCLTAs with distinct physicochemical properties.

    3. Uptake and Intracellular Fate of Fluorescent-Magnetic Glyco-nanoparticles (pages 302–307)

      Juan Gallo, Nuria Genicio and Soledad Penadés

      Version of Record online: 10 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200051

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The internalization mechanism and the intracellular fate of magnetic glyco-nanoparticles into tumoral cells are unveiled in this study. Fluorescence techniques have been used to study in depth the interaction between carbohydrate-functionalized gold-coated magnetite nanoparticles and C33 tumoral cells.

    4. Functionalized Poly(γ-Glutamic Acid) Fibrous Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering (pages 308–315)

      Cristina Gentilini, Yixiang Dong, Jessica R. May, Silvia Goldoni, David E. Clarke, Boon-Heng Lee, E. Thomas Pashuck and Molly M. Stevens

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200036

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A range of water-resistant fibrous scaffolds of enzyme degradable, modified poly(γ-glutamic acid) support high viability of human mesenchymal stem cells, and are proposed as excellent candidates for tissue engineering. In particular, fibers of poly(γ-glutamic acid) benzyl ester show exceptional cell adhesion and viability when compared to synthetic poly(L-lactic acid).

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Reports
    8. Full Papers
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. Cascaded Photoinduced Drug Delivery to Cells from Multifunctional Core–Shell Mesoporous Silica (pages 316–320)

      Axel Schloßbauer, Anna M. Sauer, Valentina Cauda, Alexandra Schmidt, Hanna Engelke, Ulrich Rothbauer, Kourosh Zolghadr, Heinrich Leonhardt, Christoph Bräuchle and Thomas Bein

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100033

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Different bioactive molecules are released into living cells from lipid-covered mesoporous silica nanoparticles. The release is triggered by light, as the particles feature covalently attached photosensitizers as membrane-opening agents. It is demonstrated that the particles achieve endosomal escape and that they release their cargo into the cytosol.

    2. Cell-Specific Intracellular Anticancer Drug Delivery from Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles with pH Sensitivity (pages 321–325)

      Zhong Luo, Kaiyong Cai, Yan Hu, Beilu Zhang and Dawei Xu

      Version of Record online: 27 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100030

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A nanoreservoir for efficient intracellular anticancer drug delivery based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles end-capped with lactobionic acid–grafted bovine serum albumin is fabricated. It demonstrates great potential for both cell-specific endocytosis and intracellular pH-responsive controlled release of drugs. A possible endocytosis pathway/mechanism of the smart controlled drug release system is proposed.

  9. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Reports
    8. Full Papers
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. Gene Delivery: Synthesis of Tunable Theranostic Fe3O4@Mesoporous Silica Nanospheres for Biomedical Applications (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 3/2012) (page 326)

      Yang Zhao, Li-Ning Lin, Yang Lu, Huai-Ling Gao, Shao-Feng Chen, Ping Yang and Shu-Hong Yu

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290012

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A system of tunable theranostic Fe3O4@mesoporous silica nanospheres for diagnosis and gene therapy has been designed by Shu-Hong Yu and co-workers on page 327. Tunable delivery of imaging probe and gene can be realized by the tunable magnetic cores and modification of surface charges. These silica nanospheres may act as a theranostic nanosystem due to good biocompatibility, effective MRI diagnosis and gene delivery capabilities.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Reports
    8. Full Papers
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. Synthesis of Tunable Theranostic Fe3O4@Mesoporous Silica Nanospheres for Biomedical Applications (pages 327–331)

      Yang Zhao, Li-Ning Lin, Yang Lu, Huai-Ling Gao, Shao-Feng Chen, Ping Yang and Shu-Hong Yu

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200005

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Tunable theranostic Fe3O4@mesoporous silica nanospheres: Tunable theranostic Fe3O4@mesoporous silica nanospheres for diagnosis and gene therapy have been designed. The tunable delivery doses of imaging probe and gene by Fe3O4@mesoporous silica nanospheres can be realized by the tunable magnetic cores and modification of surface charges. These Fe3O4@mesoporous silica nanospheres may act as a theranostic nanosystem due to good biocompatibility, effective MRI diagnosis and gene delivery capabilities.

    2. Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle-based H2O2 Responsive Controlled-Release System Used for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment (pages 332–336)

      Jie Geng, Meng Li, Li Wu, Cuie Chen and Xiaogang Qu

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200067

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel strategy has been presented by using H2O2-responsive controlled-release system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles for Alzheimer's disease treatment. By taking advantage of the good biocompatibility, cellular uptake properties, and efficient intracellular release of metal chelators, the delivery system is promising for future in vivo biomedical applications.

    3. PEI Conjugated Gold Nanoparticles: Efficient Gene Carriers with Visible Fluorescence (pages 337–341)

      Huayu Tian, Zhaopei Guo, Jie Chen, Lin Lin, Jialiang Xia, Xuan Dong and Xuesi Chen

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200033

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Low molecular weight polyethyleneimines were conjugated onto gold nanoparticles to form Au-PEI conjugates. Au-PEI is the first reported gene carrier which has both high transfection efficiency and strong fluorescence. Au-PEI showed higher transfection efficiency and it can be used for bioimaging because it can be detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy and in vivo bioimaging system.

    4. Lipophilic Silver Nanoparticles and Their Polymeric Entrapment into Targeted-PEG-Based Micelles for the Treatment of Glioblastoma (pages 342–347)

      Erica Locatelli, Francesca Broggi, Jessica Ponti, Patrick Marmorato, Fabio Franchini, Stefano Lena and Mauro Comes Franchini

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100047

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simple method for the synthesis of lipophilic Ag NPs have been developed. The coated Ag NPs have been entrapped into a FDA-approved and targetable PEG-based polymeric nanoparticles, and this nanocarrier has been conjugated with the peptide chlorotoxin. Uptake experiments have shown a cell-specific recognition of the Ag-1-PNPs-Cltx on U87MG cell lines in comparison to Balb/3T3. The uptake of Ag into the cells was quantified and an interesting cytotoxic effect (IC50 = 45 μM) has been found on glioblastoma cell lines.

    5. Delivery of Ricin Toxin A-Chain by Peptide-Targeted Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle-Supported Lipid Bilayers (pages 348–353)

      Katharine Epler, David Padilla, Genevieve Phillips, Peter Crowder, Robert Castillo, Dan Wilkinson, Brian Wilkinson, Cameron Burgard, Robin Kalinich, Jason Townson, Bryce Chackerian, Cheryl Willman, David Peabody, Walker Wharton, C. Jeffrey Brinker, Carlee Ashley and Eric Carnes

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200022

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mesoporous silica nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers, or “protocells”, exhibit a high loading capacity, enhanced colloidal stability, and peptide-directed, cell-specific uptake, making them especially well-suited for targeted delivery of protein toxins to cancer. Protocells loaded with ricin toxin A-chain (RTA) and targeted to hepatocellular carcinoma cause complete cell death at 30 pM of RTA without affecting the viability of control hepatocytes.

    6. An Anti-Clogging 3D Porous Membrane for Sorting and Patterning of Micro-Entities (pages 354–359)

      Shashi Ranjan, Subramanian Tamil Selvan and Yong Zhang

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200023

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A 3D porous membrane containing pyramidal microstructures around funnel-like pores is demonstrated as a unique anti-clogging porous membrane for high efficiency sorting and patterning of cells/beads. The membrane exhibits four interesting features: anti-clogging, patterning of micro-entities of different sizes, bi-directional separation and simultaneous separation and patterning of micro-entities.

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