Advanced Healthcare Materials

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 4

July, 2012

Volume 1, Issue 4

Pages 365–525

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Progress Report
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Cell Sorting: Microfluidic Cell Sorter (μFCS) for On-chip Capture and Analysis of Single Cells (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 4/2012) (page 365)

      Jaehoon Chung, Huilin Shao, Thomas Reiner, David Issadore, Ralph Weissleder and Hakho Lee

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290018

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      Many cancers shed malignant cells into the circulation. These cancer cells are important for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes but their purification, quantification and characterization remain challenging. On page 432, Hakho Lee, Ralph Weissleder, and co-workers present a low-cost, rapid microfluidic cell sorter (μFCS) device for the detection and molecular analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The μFCS efficiently enriches CTCs from unprocessed whole blood, allows on-chip culture and molecular profiling, and provides cell retrieval for subsequent analyses. The potential clinical application of the technology is demonstrated by capturing and genetically analyzing CTCs in tumorbearing mice.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Progress Report
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Virus-Shell Engineering: Biomineralization-Based Virus Shell-Engineering: Towards Neutralization Escape and Tropism Expansion (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 4/2012) (page 366)

      Xiaoyu Wang, Yongqiang Deng, Shihua Li, Guangchuan Wang, Ede Qin, Xurong Xu, Ruikang Tang and Chengfeng Qin

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290019

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      Viruses in nanoscale are ideal templates for functional modification by chemical or material methods. On page 443, Chengfeng Qin, Ruikang Tang, Xiaoyu Wang, and co-workers present a novel surface modification strategy to afford a biocompatible and bio-degradable calcium phosphate (CaPi) shell onto single virus. Biomineralization-based virus shell engineering generates a Trojan virus that can enter cells in a receptor-independent manner and escape neutralization by antibodies, opening up multiple applications in biomedicines and materials.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Progress Report
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 4/2012)

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290020

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Progress Report
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Contents: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 4/2012) (pages 367–372)

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290017

  5. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Progress Report
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Advanced Materials for Co-Delivery of Drugs and Genes in Cancer Therapy (pages 373–392)

      Majad Khan, Zhan Yuin Ong, Nikken Wiradharma, Amalina Bte Ebrahim Attia and Yi-Yan Yang

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200109

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      The simultaneous delivery of anticancer drugs and genes provides a highly promising strategy to increase the safety and efficacy of chemotherapy. This progress report summarizes key advances in drug and gene delivery with focus on the development of polymers, peptides, liposomes and inorganic materials as nanocarriers for co-delivery of anticancer drugs and therapeutic genes or proteins.

  6. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Progress Report
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Silk Fibroin in Tissue Engineering (pages 393–412)

      Naresh Kasoju and Utpal Bora

      Article first published online: 4 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200097

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      Silkworm-derived silk fibroin has extensively been used as scaffolding material, in diverse forms and compositions, for in vitro engineering/regeneration of various human tissues. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art in the silk fibroin based tissue engineering and identifies the opportunities for further development of this field.

    2. Inorganic Nanoparticles Based Contrast Agents for X-ray Computed Tomography (pages 413–431)

      Anshuman Jakhmola, Nicolas Anton and Thierry F. Vandamme

      Article first published online: 18 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200032

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      Inorganic nanomaterials as X-ray contrast agents: Inorganic nanomaterials (nanostructures and nanosystems) offer great potential for the development of next-generation contrasting agents for X-ray computed tomography and imaging. This review provides an overview of various heavy metal based nanosystems and their assemblies (e.g., hybrid, core-shell, bioconjugated), with a focus on their synthesis protocol, in vitro/in vivo contrasting properties as well as their potential targeting applications for cancerous tumors and tissues.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Progress Report
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Microfluidic Cell Sorter (μFCS) for On-chip Capture and Analysis of Single Cells (pages 432–436)

      Jaehoon Chung, Huilin Shao, Thomas Reiner, David Issadore, Ralph Weissleder and Hakho Lee

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200046

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A low-cost and rapid microfluidic cell sorter (μFCS) for circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection, culture and analyses is developed. Based on size separation and molecular characterization, μFCS efficiently enriches CTCs from unprocessed whole blood, allows on-chip culture and molecular profiling, and provides cell retrieval for subsequent analyses. The potential clinical application of the technology is demonstrated by capturing and genetically analyzing CTCs in tumor-bearing mice.

    2. Stealth Rare Earth Oxide Nanodiscs for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (pages 437–442)

      Mark J. Bailey, Rob van der Weegen, Piper J. Klemm, Suzanne L. Baker and Brett A. Helms

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200039

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      Configuring RE2O3 nanocrystals with pseudo-2D morphologies confers substantive gains in relaxivities over equivalent spherical counterparts. The most promising arises from Gd2O3 whose ionic transverse and longitudinal relaxivities were as high as r1 = 12.7 mM−1 s−1 and r2 = 17.2 mM−1 s−1 (dispersed in H2O, T = 37 °C & B0 = 1.41 T), pointing to new opportunities to achieve high contrast MRI while concomitantly affording longer half-life potential in vivo.

    3. Biomineralization-Based Virus Shell-Engineering: Towards Neutralization Escape and Tropism Expansion (pages 443–449)

      Xiaoyu Wang, Yongqiang Deng, Shihua Li, Guangchuan Wang, Ede Qin, Xurong Xu, Ruikang Tang and Chengfeng Qin

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200034

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biomineralization-based virus shell-engineering (BVSE) is a potential surface modification strategy to afford a biocompatible and biodegradable calcium phosphate (CaPi) shell onto single virus, allowing development of Trojan virus with enhanced infection, expanded tropism and neutralization escape, which open up the multiple applications of virus in biomedicines and materials.

    4. Dual-Imaging Enabled Cancer-Targeting Nanoparticles (pages 450–456)

      Aniket S. Wadajkar, Tejaswi Kadapure, Yi Zhang, Weina Cui, Kytai T. Nguyen and Jian Yang

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100055

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      The development of dual-imaging enabled cancer-targeting nanoparticles (DICT-NPs) is reported based on newly developed biodegradable photoluminescent polymers and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. DICT-NPs possess capabilities of dual-imaging (magnetic resonance imaging and optical imaging), magnetic targeting, and potentially selective targeting for cancer cells. The development of DICT-NPs addresses the concerns in dual-imaging nanoparticles where photobleaching organic dyes and cytotoxic quantum dots are usually adopted.

    5. Regulating Specific Growth Factor Signaling Using Immobilized Branched Ligands (pages 457–460)

      Michael W. Toepke, Nicholas A. Impellitteri, Sheeny K. Lan Levengood, Derek S. Boeldt, Ian M. Bird and William L. Murphy

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200077

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      VEGF-binding peptide ligands are incorporated into hydrogel microspheres and reduce the amount of growth factor in solution. VEGF binding affinity is enhanced by creating ligands with a dimer structure. The spheres are able to knock down VEGF-mediated HUVEC growth and reduce calcium signaling. The binding interaction is reversible, allowing the spheres to be used as a VEGF delivery vehicle.

    6. Hybrid BaYbF5 Nanoparticles: Novel Binary Contrast Agent for High-Resolution in Vivo X-ray Computed Tomography Angiography (pages 461–466)

      Yanlan Liu, Kelong Ai, Jianhua Liu, Qinghai Yuan, Yangyang He and Lehui Lu

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200028

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      A novel CT contrast agent denoted as BaYbF5@SiO2@PEG is presented. The as-prepared nanoparticles exhibit significantly enhanced contrast efficacy relative to clinical iodinated agents and maintain higher X-ray attenuation at different voltages, suitable for diagnostic imaging of various patients. Prolonged circulation time in vivo and low toxicity mean the nanoparticles perform excellently in in-vivo X-ray CT angiography.

    7. Tumor Inside a Pearl Drop (pages 467–469)

      Tina Arbatan, Aswan Al-Abboodi, Fatemeh Sarvi, Peggy Pui Yik Chan and Wei Shen

      Article first published online: 31 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200050

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The confined internal space of a liquid marble, as well as its porous and non-adhesive shell, offers an attractive application possibility - accommodating living cells inside liquid marbles. Cancer cells in suspension may aggregate to form three dimensional structures, also known as cancer cell spheroids (CCS). In this study, CCS formation inside liquid marble is investigated. This liquid marble application opens significant and novel avenues for biomedical applications and cancer research.

    8. Anti-cAngptl4 Ab-Conjugated N-TiO2/NaYF4:Yb,Tm Nanocomposite for Near Infrared-Triggered Drug Release and Enhanced Targeted Cancer Cell Ablation (pages 470–474)

      Qing Chi Xu, Yan Zhang, Ming Jie Tan, Yang Liu, Shaojun Yuan, Cleo Choong, Nguan Soon Tan and Timothy Thatt Yang Tan

      Article first published online: 4 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200055

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanomedicine: NIR-active N-TiO2/NaYF4:Yb,Tm nanocomposites (NCs) were synthesized for the first time and its potential applications in drug release and targeted cancer cell ablation are explored. Upon 980 nm laser irradiation, the anti-cAngptl4 Ab-conjugated N-TiO2/NaYF4:Yb,Tm NCs shows a significant increase in apoptotic A-5RT3 cells when compared with that of the unconjugated NCs. The mechanisms for NIR-induced photocatalysis, drug release and targeted cancer cell killing are proposed.

    9. A Hydrophobic Dye-Encapsulated Nano-Hybrid as an Efficient Fluorescent Probe for Living Cell Imaging (pages 475–479)

      Shu Chang, Xumeng Wu, Yongsheng Li, Dechao Niu, Zhi Ma, Wenru Zhao, Jinlou Gu, Wenjie Dong, Feng Ding, Weihong Zhu and Jianlin Shi

      Article first published online: 5 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200144

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      Water-soluble hydrophobic-dye@nano-hybrids (DPN@NHs) with extraordinarily enhanced fluorescent performance were fabricated by encapsulating the hydrophobic dye molecules into the core of the hybrid nanospheres based on the self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers followed by shell cross-linking using 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxy-silane. The DPN@NHs are 50 nm in size, are monodispersed in aqueous solution and have a quantum yield enhanced by 30 times.

    10. Latent TGF-β Hydrogels for Cartilage Tissue Engineering (pages 480–484)

      Elsie S. Place, Rekha Nair, Helena N. Chia, Greg Szulgit, Erh-hsuin Lim and Molly M. Stevens

      Article first published online: 31 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200038

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      A biomimetic delivery strategy for transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is described, in which TGF-β is presented in a latent form (the small latent complex, SLC), which is inactive until modified by the actions of the cells. In this work, SLC is tethered to a hyaluronic acid hydrogel scaffold to enhance in vitro chondrogenesis.

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Progress Report
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Zn2+ Binding-Enabled Excited State Intramolecular Proton Transfer: A Step toward New Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probes for Imaging Applications (pages 485–492)

      Yongqian Xu, Qin Liu, Bairui Dou, Brian Wright, Jingyun Wang and Yi Pang

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200025

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      Using zinc binding to switch on the excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) leads to a new fluorescent sensor (Zinhbo-5) which gives the desirable near-infrared emission (over 710 nm) with large Stokes shift (ca. 240 nm). The new probe is useful for imaging the intracellular Zn2+ ion in vivo, and for detecting zinc ions in neuromast of living zebrafish.

    2. Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles for Synergistic Enhancement of Cancer Treatment by Combinatorial Radio Frequency Thermolysis and Drug Delivery (pages 493–501)

      Yang Xu, Alokita Karmakar, Wolf E. Heberlein, Thikra Mustafa, Alexandru R. Biris and Alexandru S. Biris

      Article first published online: 4 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200079

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      Two anti-cancer drugs are loaded onto magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) by π–π stacking. During the controlled drug release process triggered by RF or pH variation, the MNPs act as heat inducing agents and also as drug nanocarriers to destroy the pancreatic cancer cells highly efficiently. The combination of anti-cancer drugs and RF treatment provides a synergistic effect for the inducement of cancer cell death.

    3. A Universal Scaling Law to Predict the Efficiency of Magnetic Nanoparticles as MRI T2-Contrast Agents (pages 502–512)

      Quoc L. Vuong, Jean-François Berret, Jérôme Fresnais, Yves Gossuin and Olivier Sandre

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200078

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      This study evidences size, magnetization and magnetic volume fraction as the only control parameters of MRI T2 contrast agents. Experimental relaxation and magnetometry data on magnetic particles are used to construct a master curve, allowing the prediction of the efficiency of any nanoparticles or clusters. A calculation of the optimal sizes for T2 contrast agents of different natures is also performed.

    4. Understanding the Nano-topography Changes and Cellular Influences Resulting from the Surface Adsorption of Human Hair Keratins (pages 513–519)

      Francesca Taraballi, Shuai Wang, Jian Li, Fiona Yann Yann Lee, Subbu S. Venkatraman, William R. Birch, Swee Hin Teoh, Freddy Yin Chiang Boey and Kee Woei Ng

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200043

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      Keratin is easily extracted from human hair and forms a nanoparticulate suspension that can create a nanostructured surface by simple adsorption. This surface was found to encourage cell proliferation and fibronectin expression. Given that autologous keratin is readily available, its use as a biofunctional coating could be interesting for biomedical applications.

    5. Deposition of Triamcinolone Acetonide and Its Effect on Soft Tissue Topography (pages 520–525)

      Celimar Valentin-Rodriguez, Tongalp H. Tezel and Albena Ivanisevic

      Article first published online: 5 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200049

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      Bimodal atomic force microscopy, a newer AFM imaging mode, reveals the ultrastructure of ex vivo inner limiting membrane (ILM) tissues. Triamcinolone scetonide is observed to have a significant effect on ILM topography when compared to collagen fibrillar sheets. This is attributed to the rugged and heterogeneous surface of ILM tissues.

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