Advanced Healthcare Materials

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 5

September, 2012

Volume 1, Issue 5

Pages 529–678

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Full Papers
    9. Communications
    1. Biosensors: Rapid Detection of Hendra Virus Using Magnetic Particles and Quantum Dots (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 5/2012) (page 529)

      Fabio Lisi, Paolo Falcaro, Dario Buso, Anita J. Hill, Jennifer A. Barr, Gary Crameri, Tich-Lam Nguyen, Lin-Fa Wang and Paul Mulvaney

      Article first published online: 14 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290022

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      Point-of-care methodologies for the rapid detection of emerging viruses are essential for combatting viral outbreaks. On page 631, P. Falcaro, L.-F. Wang, and co-workers report on progress towards the detection of the Hendra virus, based on antibody-conjugated quantum dots and antibody-conjugated magnetic particles.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Full Papers
    9. Communications
    1. Tissue Reconstruction: Cellular Hydrogel Biopaper for Patterned 3D Cell Culture and Modular Tissue Reconstruction (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 5/2012) (page 530)

      Wonhye Lee, Chae Yun Bae, Seyong Kwon, Jaejung Son, Jinho Kim, Yong Jeong, Seung-Schik Yoo and Je-Kyun Park

      Article first published online: 14 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290023

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      A novel 3D cell culture or tissue reconstruction module, “microarchitectured freestanding cellular hydrogel biopaper” was facilely fabricated with freestanding culture capability. The cover picture shows a stereomicroscopic dark field image of HepG2 cells encased in the hydrogel biopapers with microhole perforations, during the freestanding culture. For more information, please read the Communication “Cellular Hydrogel Biopaper for Patterned 3D Cell Culture and Modular Tissue Reconstruction” by J.-K. Park and co-workers on page 635.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Full Papers
    9. Communications
    1. Peptide-Based Biomaterials: Rational Molecular Design of Complementary Self-Assembling Peptide Hydrogels (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 5/2012) (page 679)

      Stuart Kyle, Susan H Felton, Michael J. McPherson, Amalia Aggeli and Eileen Ingham

      Article first published online: 14 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290024

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      Rational molecular design of self-assembling peptide-based biomaterials is of growing interest for use in numerous healthcare applications. On page 640 A. Aggeli, E. Ingham, and co-workers report on a binary peptide system P11-13 and P11-14, which although monomeric under physiological conditions, upon mixing instantaneously associate to form a selfsupporting hydrogel. Histological analysis through haemotoxylin and eosin staining of the P11-13/P11-14 hydrogel reveal an ordered array of large fiber-like networks with smaller interconnecting fibrils.

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Full Papers
    9. Communications
    1. Masthead: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 5/2012)

      Article first published online: 14 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290025

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Full Papers
    9. Communications
    1. Contents: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 5/2012) (pages 531–536)

      Article first published online: 14 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290021

  6. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Full Papers
    9. Communications
    1. Erythrocyte-Inspired Delivery Systems (pages 537–547)

      Che-Ming J. Hu, Ronnie H. Fang and Liangfang Zhang

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200138

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      The extraordinary circulation time of red blood cells (RBCs) has driven many to exploit and mimic RBCs for drug delivery. In this progress report, RBC-inspired delivery platforms, including carrier RBCs and synthetic RBC mimics, are discussed. An emphasis is placed on the emerging techniques that translate the growing understanding of RBC properties toward biomedical applications.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Full Papers
    9. Communications
    1. Mussel-Inspired Coating of Polydopamine Directs Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cell Fate for Re-endothelialization of Vascular Devices (pages 548–559)

      Zhilu Yang, Qiufen Tu, Ying Zhu, Rifang Luo, Xin Li, Yichu Xie, Manfred F. Maitz, Jin Wang and Nan Huang

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200073

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      A durable, mussel-inspired, polydopamine-coated stent is reported. This mussel-inspired coated stent shows significant enhancement in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) attachment, proliferation, migration, and function as compared with the bare 316L SS stent. The mussel-inspired coated stent also has the substantial ability to inhibit human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell (HUASMC) adhesion and proliferation, suggesting it has the potential to address issues associated with re-endothelialization and restenosis.

    2. A Rapid Screening Method for Wound Dressing by Cell-on-a-Chip Device (pages 560–566)

      Qilong Zhao, Shiwen Wang, Yunyan Xie, Wenfu Zheng, Zhuo Wang, Le Xiao, Wei Zhang and Xingyu Jiang

      Article first published online: 8 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200008

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      A rapid method for wound dressing screening was developed by using a cell-on-a-chip device with different types of cells. This method was reliable for simulating the complex process of wound healing, including formation of granulating tissue and re-epithelialization, which was sufficient to predict the performance of wound dressings when used in vivo.

    3. Polyvalent Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle-Aptamer Bioconjugates Target Breast Cancer Cells (pages 567–572)

      Le-Le Li, Qian Yin, Jianjun Cheng and Yi Lu

      Article first published online: 8 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200116

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      Aptamar biology is combined with nanotechnology. Polyvalent mesoporous silica nanocarriers functionalized with aptamer capable of targeting nucleolin were constructed; the high-surface-area nanoporous core allowed high drug loading and the surface-conjugated aptamer facilitated the nanoparticle targeting of nucleolin-overexpressed MSF-7 cells. Efficient cancer-cell-specific fluorescent imaging and drug delivery were demonstrated.

    4. An Antithrombogenic Citric Acid-Crosslinked Gelatin with Endothelialization Activity (pages 573–581)

      Motoki Inoue, Makoto Sasaki, Asako Nakasu, Mariko Takayanagi and Tetsushi Taguchi

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200001

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      A novel citric acid-crosslinked gelatin matrix with endothelialization activity and anti-adhesive properties for platelets is prepared. The properties of the matrix are investigated by biochemical and physicochemical methods. Bioluminescence imaging reveals that the biocompatibility of the matrix is higher than that of a glutaraldehyde-crosslinked gelatin matrix. These results indicate that the matrix has great potential for use in blood-contacting materials.

    5. Rapid Synthesis of Near Infrared Polymeric Micelles for Real-Time Sentinel Lymph Node Imaging (pages 582–589)

      Dipanjan Pan, Xin Cai, Benjamin Kim, Allen J. Stacy, Lihong V. Wang and Gregory M. Lanza

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200087

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      Non-invasive “real-time” in vivo photoacoustic (PA) imaging of sentinel lymph node (SLN) in rat using NIR polymeric micelles: PA scans acquired immediately after the polymeric nanoparticle injection provide blood vessel (BV), and SLN images in rats. The study proposes real-time, high-resolution intraoperative PA imaging to facilitate direct assessment of the SLN in breast cancer staging with sub 20 nm NIR polymeric micelles.

    6. 3D Porous Chitosan–Alginate Scaffolds: A New Matrix for Studying Prostate Cancer Cell–Lymphocyte Interactions In Vitro (pages 590–599)

      Stephen J. Florczyk, Gang Liu, Forrest M. Kievit, Allison M. Lewis, Jennifer D. Wu and Miqin Zhang

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201100054

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      Chitosan–alginate scaffolds are demonstrated as an in vitro human prostate cancer tumor microenvironment model for studying interactions with peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). These in vitro tumor models support interaction with co-cultured human PBLs and allow for robust downstream analyses, indicating the potential of chitosan–alginate scaffolds for high-throughput in vitro screening of immunotherapies.

    7. A Novel Solid Lipid Nanoparticle Formulation for Active Targeting to Tumor αvβ3 Integrin Receptors Reveals Cyclic RGD as A Double-Edged Sword (pages 600–608)

      Adam J. Shuhendler, Preethy Prasad, Michael Leung, Andrew M. Rauth, Ralph S. DaCosta and Xiao Yu Wu

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200006

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      The presentation of biologically active cyclic-RGD molecules on the surface of stealth solid lipid nanoparticles acts as a double-edged sword, prolonging tumor retention of nanoparticles by selectively binding to αvβ3 integrin receptors while reducing the extent of tumor uptake due to elevated hepatic and splenic accumulation.

    8. New Biocide with Both N-Chloramine and Quaternary Ammonium Moieties Exerts Enhanced Bactericidal Activity (pages 609–620)

      Lingdong Li, Tianyun Pu, George Zhanel, Nan Zhao, Werner Ens and Song Liu

      Article first published online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200018

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      A new biocidal agent with both N-chloramine and quaternary ammonium moieties is synthesized and shown to exhibit enhanced antibacterial efficacy after covalent bonding onto polymer surfaces against both MRSA and multi-drug resistant E. coli. It is hypothesized that the cationic charge helps attract negatively charged bacterial cells facilitating oxidative chlorine transfer from N-chloramine to cellbiologicalreceptors, and, hence, cause the death of bacteria.

    9. Wound-Healing with Mechanically Robust and Biodegradable Hydrogel Fibers Loaded with Silver Nanoparticles (pages 621–630)

      Kevin Neibert, Venkateshwarlu Gopishetty, Anton Grigoryev, Ihor Tokarev, Noura Al-Hajaj, Joshua Vorstenbosch, Anie Philip, Sergiy Minko and Dusica Maysinger

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200075

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      Nanoparticle-containing alginate fibers promote wound healing in vivo in an incision mouse model. We provide a simple approach for wound-healing materials made of covalently cross-linked alginate fibers loaded with silver nanoparticles. This approach allows the incorporation of silver nanoparticles to desired and controlled concentrations into alginate fibers while retaining their mechanical and swelling properties.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Full Papers
    9. Communications
    1. Rapid Detection of Hendra Virus Using Magnetic Particles and Quantum Dots (pages 631–634)

      Fabio Lisi, Paolo Falcaro, Dario Buso, Anita J. Hill, Jennifer A. Barr, Gary Crameri, Tich-Lam Nguyen, Lin-Fa Wang and Paul Mulvaney

      Article first published online: 31 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200072

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      A proof-of-concept for the development of a fast and portable Hendra virus biosensor is presented. Hendra virus, a deadly emerging pathogen in Australia, can be co-localized, concentrated and revealed using simultaneously magnetic and luminescent functional particles. This method should be applicable for the early detection of any other virus by targeting the specific virus with the corresponding antibody.

    2. Cellular Hydrogel Biopaper for Patterned 3D Cell Culture and Modular Tissue Reconstruction (pages 635–639)

      Wonhye Lee, Chae Yun Bae, Seyong Kwon, Jaejung Son, Jinho Kim, Yong Jeong, Seung-Schik Yoo and Je-Kyun Park

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200158

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      Microarchitectured freestanding cellular hydrogel biopaper as a novel 3D cell culture or tissue reconstruction module is reported. New harvesting, transfer, and assembly techniques are used to construct laminated tissue composites of the biopaper, such as hepatic hydrogel sheet modules with augmented liver function for stratified 3D hepatic tissue reconstruction.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Rational Molecular Design of Complementary Self-Assembling Peptide Hydrogels (pages 640–645)

      Stuart Kyle, Susan H Felton, Michael J. McPherson, Amalia Aggeli and Eileen Ingham

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200047

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      Rational molecular design of self- assembling peptide-based materials that spontaneously form self-supporting hydrogels shows potential in many healthcare applications. Binary peptides based on complementary charged sequences are developed, and the use of biophysical analysis and cell-based studies highlights that the charged interactions can influence the properties of peptide materials and ultimately affect biomaterial applications.

    4. Novel Biopolymers to Enhance Endothelialisation of Intra-vascular Devices (pages 646–656)

      Salvatore Pernagallo, Olga Tura, Mei Wu, Kay Samuel, Juan J. Diaz-Mochon, Anna Hansen, Rong Zhang, Melany Jackson, Gareth J. Padfield, Patrick W.F. Hadoke, Nicholas L. Mills, Marc L. Turner, John P. Iredale, David C. Hay and Mark Bradley

      Article first published online: 9 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200130

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      Rapid endothelisation is of critical importance in the prevention of adverse remodelling after device implantation. Currently, there is a need for alternative strategies to promote re-endothelialisation for intravascular stents and vascular grafts. Using polymer microarray technology 345 polymers are comprehensively assessed and a matrix is identified that specifically supports both progenitor and mature endothelial cell activity in vitro and in vivo while minimising platelet attachment.

    5. Size-Controlled and Biocompatible Gd2O3 Nanoparticles for Dual Photoacoustic and MR Imaging (pages 657–660)

      Yu Kimura, Ryota Kamisugi, Michiko Narazaki, Tetsuya Matsuda, Yasuhiko Tabata, Akio Toshimitsu and Teruyuki Kondo

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200103

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      The synthesis, characterization, and functional evaluation of new size-controlled and biocompatible Gd2O3 nanoparticles as a bimodal contrast agent for use in photoacoustic (PA) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are reported. These nanoparticles show a clear PA image by themselves, without conjugation with gold, rare earth metals, or dyes. Relaxivity measurement by MR imaging clearly shows that their relaxivity, r1, is twice that of clinically available Gd-DTPA.

    6. Smart Interface Materials Integrated with Microfluidics for On-Demand Local Capture and Release of Cells (pages 661–668)

      Umut Atakan Gurkan, Savas Tasoglu, Derya Akkaynak, Oguzhan Avci, Sebnem Unluisler, Serli Canikyan, Noah MacCallum and Utkan Demirci

      Article first published online: 9 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200009

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      Stimuli responsive, smart interface materials are integrated with microfluidic technologies creating new functions for a broad range of biological and clinical applications by controlling the material and cell interactions. Local capture and on-demand local release of cells are demonstrated with spatial and temporal control in a microfluidic system.

    7. Antibody-Targeted Drug Delivery to Injured Arteries Using Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoparticles (pages 669–673)

      Zi Gu, Barbara E. Rolfe, Zhi Ping Xu, Julie H. Campbell, G. Q. (Max) Lu and Anita C. Thomas

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200069

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      Targeted local delivery of a nanoparticle-based, antibody-targeted, and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) delivery system successfully reduces restenosis and thrombus formation in an animal model. An antibody recognizing cross-linked fibrin (XLF) D-dimer is successfully conjugated to layered double hydroxide nanoparticles. Use of the anti-XLF-conjugated LMWH-carrying layered double hydroxide nanoparticles shows successful targeting of the nanoparticles (red) to the injured artery wall (green), resulting in decreased neointimal thickening and thrombus formation.

    8. Fabrication of Novel 3D Nanofiber Scaffolds with Anisotropic Property and Regular Pores and Their Potential Applications (pages 674–678)

      Jingwei Xie, Bing Ma and Praveesuda Lorwattanapongsa Michael

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200100

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      A new and simple approach for preparing 3D nanofiber scaffolds in a basket-weaved structure composed of uniaxially aligned, electrospun nanofiber strips is reported. It is also demonstrated that human adipose-derived stem cells seeded are distributed uniformly throughout different layers of scaffolds and can proliferate and be organized by the nanotopographic cues imparted by uniaxial arrays of nanofiber.

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