Advanced Healthcare Materials

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 6

November, 2012

Volume 1, Issue 6

Pages 681–814

  1. Cover Picture

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    6. Contents
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    8. Full Paper
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    10. Full Papers
    11. Communications
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    13. Communications
    1. Neural Tissue Engineering: Hybrid Conducting Polymer–Hydrogel Conduits for Axonal Growth and Neural Tissue Engineering (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 6/2012) (page 681)

      Mohammad R. Abidian, Eugene D. Daneshvar, Brent M. Egeland, Daryl R. Kipke, Paul S. Cederna and Melanie G. Urbanchek

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290030

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      Conduit hydrogels have been considered for axonal regeneration in both central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a drawback of hydrogel conduits is their lack of mechanical integrity and strength under physiological conditions. On page 762, M. R. Abidian and co-workers report a novel method for preparation of mechanically reinforced agarose nerve conduits that are then made conductive by use of a thin layer of conducting polymer pol(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT). The front cover illustrates axon guidance and growth inside a partially coated PEDOT agarose hydrogel conduit.

  2. Inside Front Cover

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    6. Contents
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    10. Full Papers
    11. Communications
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    13. Communications
    1. Cytokine Removal: Hierarchical Porous Carbide-Derived Carbons for the Removal of Cytokines from Blood Plasma (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 6/2012) (page 682)

      Volker Presser, Sun-Hwa Yeon, Cekdar Vakifahmetoglu, Carol A. Howell, Susan R. Sandeman, Paolo Colombo, Sergey Mikhalovsky and Yury Gogotsi

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290031

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      Carbide-derived carbons with hierarchical porosity derived from a polymer precursor can be used for the extracorporeal removal of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. The removal rates scale with the surface area of pores large enough to accommodate the protein molecules and this method has potential for efficacious treatment of sepsis, one of the major challenges in healthcare. Further information can be found in the Communication by S. Mikhalovsky, Y. Gogotsi, and co-workers on page 796.

  3. Back Cover

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    6. Contents
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    10. Full Papers
    11. Communications
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    13. Communications
    1. Myo-regenerative Scaffolds: Electrical Stimulation of Myoblast Proliferation and Differentiation on Aligned Nanostructured Conductive Polymer Platforms (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 6/2012) (page 815)

      Anita F. Quigley, Joselito M. Razal, Magdalena Kita, Rohoullah Jalili, Amy Gelmi, Anthony Penington, Raquel Ovalle-Robles, Ray H. Baughman, Graeme M. Clark, Gordon G. Wallace and Robert M. I. Kapsa

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290032

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      Nanostructured, electrically active scaffolds can be used to control the orientation of muscle fibers and to accelerate muscle regeneration ex vivo. It is envisaged that such scaffolds can be used in bionic devices for interfacing with muscular tissues as well as neural tissues. Further details can be found in the Communication by G. G. Wallace, R. M. I. Kapsa, and co-workers on page 801.

  4. Masthead

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    11. Communications
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    13. Communications
    1. Masthead: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 6/2012)

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290033

  5. Contents

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    11. Communications
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    13. Communications
  6. Frontispiece

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    13. Communications
    1. Drug Delivery: Functional Silica Nanoparticles for Redox-Triggered Drug/ssDNA Co-delivery (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 6/2012) (page 689)

      Xing Ma, Kim Truc Nguyen, Parijat Borah, Chung Yen Ang and Yanli Zhao

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290027

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      A mesoporous silica nanoparticle based co-delivery system for redox-triggered simultaneous release of drug and single strand DNA is reported by Y. L. Zhao and co-workers on page 690. High co-delivery efficiency of the biocompatible nanoparticles has been demonstrated in vitro, exhibiting the successful release of both anticancer drug doxorubicin and single strand DNA into Hela cancer cells for improved apoptosis.

  7. Full Paper

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    13. Communications
    1. Functional Silica Nanoparticles for Redox-Triggered Drug/ssDNA Co-delivery (pages 690–697)

      Xing Ma, Kim Truc Nguyen, Parijat Borah, Chung Yen Ang and Yanli Zhao

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200123

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      A mesoporous silica nanoparticle based co-delivery system is developed in order to deliver simultaneously drug and single strand DNA in a controlled manner. Ammonium units containing cleavable disulfide bonds are introduced onto the nanoparticle surface. Thus, negatively charged single strand DNA is immobilized onto the nanoparticle surface through electrostatic interactions with the ammonium units, effectively blocking the loaded drugs within the mesopores of the nanoparticles. The pre-installed disulfide bonds on the nanoparticle surface can be cleaved by the addition of the reducing agent, leading to the co-delivery of the single strand DNA and drugs. High co-delivery efficiency of the biocompatible nanoparticles is demonstrated in vitro, indicating the successful release of both anticancer drugs and single strand DNA into Hela cancer cells for improved apoptosis.

  8. Frontispiece

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    11. Communications
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    13. Communications
    1. Doxorubicin Release: Hybrid Organic Nanotubes with Dual Functionalities Localized on Cylindrical Nanochannels Control the Release of Doxorubicin (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 6/2012) (page 698)

      Wuxiao Ding, Naohiro Kameta, Hiroyuki Minamikawa, Momoyo Wada, Toshimi Shimizu and Mitsutoshi Masuda

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290028

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      Novel cylindrical nanocapsules, with tunable inner surface, enable controlled release of the encapsulated anticancer drug doxorubicin. On page 699, M. Masuda and co-workers develop such nanocapsules with dual functionalities (–COOH and benzyloxycarbonyl) localized on their cylindrical nanochannels via a co-assembly of two rationally designed glycolipids.

  9. Full Papers

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    13. Communications
    1. Hybrid Organic Nanotubes with Dual Functionalities Localized on Cylindrical Nanochannels Control the Release of Doxorubicin (pages 699–706)

      Wuxiao Ding, Naohiro Kameta, Hiroyuki Minamikawa, Momoyo Wada, Toshimi Shimizu and Mitsutoshi Masuda

      Version of Record online: 30 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200133

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      The construction, via a co-assembly approach, of hybrid organic nanotubes with dual functionalities (–COOH and benzyloxycarbonyl) localized on cylindrical nanochannels is demonstrated. The nanotubes effectively encapsulate doxorubicin (Dox) into their nanospace via complex formation between –COO groups and the –NH3+ of Dox, and sustained release of doxorubicin is achieved owing to hydrophobic interaction between benzyloxycarbonyl groups and the anthracycline moiety of doxorubicin.

    2. Fluorescence Nanoscopy of Platelets Resolves Platelet-State Specific Storage, Release and Uptake of Proteins, Opening up Future Diagnostic Applications (pages 707–713)

      Daniel Rönnlund, Yang Yang, Hans Blom, Gert Auer and Jerker Widengren

      Version of Record online: 7 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200172

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      By super-resolution stimulated emission (STED) microscopy the spatial distribution patterns of three different regulating proteins is investigated in over 300 individual platelets, demonstrating distinct resolving advantages. Upon platelet activation, spatial rearrangements of the proteins are observed, specific for a certain protein and activation. Analysis of the protein distribution patterns can reveal the type of activation, with possible diagnostic applications.

    3. Fluorescence-Tagged Gold Nanoparticles for Rapidly Characterizing the Size-Dependent Biodistribution in Tumor Models (pages 714–721)

      Leo Y. T. Chou and Warren C. W. Chan

      Version of Record online: 20 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200084

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      Fluorescence-tagged gold nanoparticles are engineered for in vivo detection. These particles are used for in vivo pharmacokinetics analysis of nanoparticle designs, and to study the size-dependent uptake of nanoparticles into tumors. Multispectral imaging of gold nanoparticles in vivo is demonstrated. The study builds a basis for high-throughput head-to-head evaluation of nanoparticle formulations in vivo.

    4. A Hybrid Hydrogel Biomaterial by Nanogel Engineering: Bottom-Up Design with Nanogel and Liposome Building Blocks to Develop a Multidrug Delivery System (pages 722–728)

      Yurina Sekine, Yuki Moritani, Tomoko Ikeda-Fukazawa, Yoshihiro Sasaki and Kazunari Akiyoshi

      Version of Record online: 29 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200175

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      Biodegradable hybrid hydrogels are obtained using nanogel-coated liposomes, which are prepared by Michael addition of the acryloyl groups of a nanogel to the thiol group, and which are terminally branched with polyethlylene glycol (PEG). The hydrogel is gradually hydrolyzed under physiological conditions releasing the nanogel and nanogel-coated liposomes. The developed hybrid hydrogel is a highly functional carrier with a time-programmed dual-release system.

    5. Direct-Write Assembly of 3D Silk/Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Bone Co-Cultures (pages 729–735)

      Lin Sun, Sara T. Parker, Daisuke Syoji, Xiuli Wang, Jennifer A. Lewis and David L. Kaplan

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200057

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      3D silk/HA microperiodic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering and angiogenesis are fabricated by direct-write assembly. This approach can be used to control filament and spacing size in the scaffold to allow investigation of the effect of scaffold architecture on osteogenesis and vessel-like structure formation from stem cells and endothelial cells.

    6. Fate of Intravenously Administered Gold Nanoparticles in Hair Follicles: Follicular Delivery, Pharmacokinetic Interpretation, and Excretion (pages 736–741)

      Ivan M. Kempson, Chia-Chi Chien, Chao-Yu Chung, Yeukuang Hwu, David Paterson, Martin D. de Jonge and Daryl L. Howard

      Version of Record online: 29 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200101

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      The hair follicle participates in accumulating and retaining nanoparticles from blood circulation. Nanoparticles are also excreted out of the body via transfollicular transport and into hair shafts where they present a retrospective pharmacokinetic profile.

    7. Capture, Enrichment, and Mass Spectrometric Detection of Low-Molecular-Weight Biomarkers with Nanoporous Silicon Microparticles (pages 742–750)

      Jie Tan, Wei-Jie Zhao, Jie-Kai Yu, Sai Ma, Michael J. Sailor and Jian-Min Wu

      Version of Record online: 28 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200161

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      Porous silicon microparticles with well controlled pore size and tailored surface chemistry can selectively capture low-molecular-weight peptides (LMWPs) within a target range of molecular size and electric charge. High-fidelity mass profiles of LMWPs can be obtained after serum samples are enriched by the microparticles, enabling cancer patients to be potentially distinguished from healthy individuals based on clustering analysis.

    8. Well-Defined Degradable Cationic Polylactide as Nanocarrier for the Delivery of siRNA to Silence Angiogenesis in Prostate Cancer (pages 751–761)

      Chih-Kuang Chen, Wing-Cheung Law, Ravikumar Aalinkeel, Bindukumar Nair, Atcha Kopwitthaya, Supriya D. Mahajan, Jessica L. Reynolds, Jiong Zou, Stanley A. Schwartz, Paras N. Prasad and Chong Cheng

      Version of Record online: 26 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200094

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      A novel nanotherapeutic system using cationic polylactides (CPLAs) as degradable and safe scaffolds for gene delivery is designed and examined. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) siRNA is successfully transfected into prostate cancer cells via the CPLA-IL-8 siRNA nanoplexes, and remarkable IL-8 suppression is achieved.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    10. Full Papers
    11. Communications
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    13. Communications
    1. Hybrid Conducting Polymer–Hydrogel Conduits for Axonal Growth and Neural Tissue Engineering (pages 762–767)

      Mohammad R. Abidian, Eugene D. Daneshvar, Brent M. Egeland, Daryl R. Kipke, Paul S. Cederna and Melanie G. Urbanchek

      Version of Record online: 27 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200182

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      Successfully and efficiently bridging peripheral nerve gaps without the use of autografts is a substantial clinical advance for peripheral nerve reconstructions. Novel templating methods for the fabrication of conductive hydrogel guidance channels for axonal regeneration are designed and developed. PEDOT is electrodeposited inside the lumen to create fully coated-PEDOT agarose conduits and partially coated-PEDOT agarose conduits.

    2. Differentiating Prion Strains Using Dendrimers (pages 768–772)

      James M. McCarthy, Beatriz Rasines, Dietmar Appelhans and Mark Rogers

      Version of Record online: 27 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200151

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      A panel of repetitively branched synthetic molecules known as dendrimers is used to identify and differentiate between different strains of the prion infectious agent, the protein-based pathogen responsible for prion disorders—a group of invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases.

    3. Thirty-Minute Total Synthesis of Microfluidic Systems and Functionalized Porous Elements via “Living” Radical Photo-Polymerization (pages 773–778)

      Vinay V. Abhyankar and Anson V. Hatch

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200127

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      A “living” radical photo-polymerization (LRPP) technique is used to rapidly fabricate microfluidic channels and micro-patterned porous polymer monoliths. Surface-initiated LRPP is then used to functionalize porous elements in a robust one-step surface modification process. Assay-ready platforms can be fully realized in less than 30 minutes. An application relevant to clinical diagnostics is presented.

    4. Metabolomics Studies Show Dose-Dependent Toxicity Induced by SiO2 Nanoparticles in MRC-5 Human Fetal Lung Fibroblasts (pages 779–784)

      Shao-Min Huang, Xinbing Zuo, Jasmine Jia'En Li, Sam Fong Yau Li, Boon Huat Bay and Choon Nam Ong

      Version of Record online: 28 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200114

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      Metabolomics measures a comprehensive range of metabolites and is applied here to understand cellular toxicity of nano-SiO2. Silica nanoparticles are assessed for their effects on MRC-5 lung fibroblasts and initial investigations reveal no significant alterations in cell viability and morphology. Further metabolomic analysis reveals dose-dependent alterations in cellular metabolism due to nano-SiO2 exposure. This methodology may be a potentially useful analytical platform to investigate nanotoxicity.

    5. Protein-Engineered Biomaterials to Generate Human Skeletal Muscle Mimics (pages 785–789)

      Debanti Sengupta, Penney M. Gilbert, Kyle J. Johnson, Helen M. Blau and Sarah C. Heilshorn

      Version of Record online: 5 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200195

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      Protein-engineered biomaterials are designed to enable culture and differentiation of human myoblasts (isolated from skeletal muscle biopsies) into functionally contractile myotubes ex vivo. Individual myoblasts align with microtopographical features (white dashed lines), fuse to form myotubes with several nuclei (blue), and form sarcomeric structures (α-actinin, green) that enable electrical pacing of contractions.

  11. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
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    11. Communications
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    13. Communications
    1. Drug Delivery: Surface-Adhered Composite Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Physical Hydrogels: Polymersome-Aided Delivery of Therapeutic Small Molecules (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 6/2012) (page 790)

      Leticia Hosta-Rigau, Bettina E. B. Jensen, Kit S. Fjeldsø, Almar Postma, Guoxin Li, Kenneth N. Goldie, Fernando Albericio, Alexander N. Zelikin and Brigitte Städler

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201290029

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      The assembly of a composite hydrogel for substrate-mediated drug delivery is reported by B. Städler and co-workers on page 791. Poly(N-acryloyl morpholine)-block-poly(cholesteryl acrylate)-block-poly(N-acryloyl morpholine) is synthesized and its self-assembly into polymersomes is shown. Polymersomeaided trapping of a cytotoxic hydrophobic compound in a poly(dopamine)-coated poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel matrix leads to reduction in viability of adhering cells.

  12. Communications

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    1. Surface-Adhered Composite Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Physical Hydrogels: Polymersome-Aided Delivery of Therapeutic Small Molecules (pages 791–795)

      Leticia Hosta-Rigau, Bettina E. B. Jensen, Kit S. Fjeldsø, Almar Postma, Guoxin Li, Kenneth N. Goldie, Fernando Albericio, Alexander N. Zelikin and Brigitte Städler

      Version of Record online: 29 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200092

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      The polymersome-aided trapping of a small antitumor compound in a poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel matrix and the subsequent viability of myoblasts adhering to this coating is reported. The results reveal an enhanced reduction of the cell viability when the therapeutic compound is delivered from the surface in comparison to solution-based delivery.

    2. Hierarchical Porous Carbide-Derived Carbons for the Removal of Cytokines from Blood Plasma (pages 796–800)

      Volker Presser, Sun-Hwa Yeon, Cekdar Vakifahmetoglu, Carol A. Howell, Susan R. Sandeman, Paolo Colombo, Sergey Mikhalovsky and Yury Gogotsi

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200044

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      A series of silicon carbonitride ceramics is utilized to obtain hierarchically porous carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) for cytokine removal. The removal rate of TNF-α and IL-6, as two examples of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, is proportional to the surface area of pores larger than the size of the protein molecule.

    3. Electrical Stimulation of Myoblast Proliferation and Differentiation on Aligned Nanostructured Conductive Polymer Platforms (pages 801–808)

      Anita F. Quigley, Joselito M. Razal, Magdalena Kita, Rohoullah Jalili, Amy Gelmi, Anthony Penington, Raquel Ovalle-Robles, Ray H. Baughman, Graeme M. Clark, Gordon G. Wallace and Robert M. I. Kapsa

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200102

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      In this study, nanostructured conductive platforms synthesized from aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes and polypyrrole are investigated as myo-regenerative scaffolds. Myotube formation follows a linear path on the platforms coinciding with extent of nanotopography. In addition, electrical stimulation enhances myo-nuclear number and differentiation. These studies demonstrate that conductive polymer platforms can be used to influence muscle cell behaviour through nanostructure and electrical stimulation.

    4. Hierarchical Structure of Electrospun Composite Fibers for Long-Term Controlled Drug Release Carriers (pages 809–814)

      Changmin Hu and Wenguo Cui

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200146

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      A novel hierarchical structure of electrospun composite fibrous scaffolds is fabricated for long-term controlled drug release carriers. The low initial burst and long-term (more than 100 days) drug release of the composite fibrous scaffolds are due to the hierarchical structure and hydrophobicity of the composite fibers.

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