Advanced Healthcare Materials

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 10

October, 2013

Volume 2, Issue 10

Pages 1297–1410

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      Stimuli-Responsive Materials: The Role of Electrostatics and Temperature on Morphological Transitions of Hydrogel Nanostructures Self-Assembled by Peptide Amphiphiles Via Molecular Dynamics Simulations (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 10/2013) (page 1297)

      Iris W. Fu, Cade B. Markegard, Brian K. Chu and Hung D. Nguyen

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370049

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      Peptide amphiphiles self-assemble into nanostructures as either cylindrical nanofibers or spherical micelles in response to specific physiological stimuli. Such morphological transition is captured by large-scale molecular dynamics simulations in examining spontaneous selfassembly starting from random configurations. On page 1388, the simulation study by Hung D. Nguyen and co-workers can potentially aid the design and development of bio-inspired materials for drug delivery, diagnostic medicine, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine.

  2. Inside Front Cover

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      Antibacterial Agents: Enzyme-Coated Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as Efficient Antibacterial Agents In Vivo (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 10/2013) (page 1298)

      Li-li Li and Hao Wang

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370050

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      On page 1351, Li-li Li and Hao Wang report lysozyme-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles as anti-bacterial agents that exhibit efficient antibacterial activity both in vitro and in vivo with low cytotoxicity and negligible hemolytic side effect. The lysozyme corona provides multivalent interaction between nanoparticles and bacterial walls, promoting hydrolysis of peptidoglycans and increased membrane-perturbation abilities. The survival bacteria in colon are three orders of magnitude lower than that in the untreated group.

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      Masthead: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 10/2013)

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370051

  4. Contents

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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
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  5. Full Paper

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    1. Mitigated Cytotoxicity and Tremendously Enhanced Gene Transfection Efficiency of PEI through Facile One-Step Carbamate Modification (pages 1304–1308)

      Chuan Yang, Wei Cheng, Pei Yun Teo, Amanda C. Engler, Daniel J. Coady, James L. Hedrick and Yi Yan Yang

      Article first published online: 18 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300046

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      Extremely efficacious gene transfection vector: The rapid and facile modification of PEI with commercially available TMC produces an extremely efficacious gene delivery vector with minimal cytotoxicity. Functionalization of PEI is easily controlled by PEI:cyclic carbonate feed ratios and allows for the addition of functionality. Modified PEIs hold great potential as gene delivery systems due to easy synthesis, scalability, low cost, low toxicity, and outstanding transfection capacity

  6. Communications

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    1. Combination Delivery of Antigens and CpG by Lanthanides-Based Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Enhanced Immune Response and Dual-Mode Imaging (pages 1309–1313)

      Zhenhua Li, Zhen Liu, Meili Yin, Xinjian Yang, Jinsong Ren and Xiaogang Qu

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200364

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      Europium-doped GdPO4 hollow spheres/polymer core-shell nanoparticles are functionalized with ovalbumin (OVA) as a model antigen and an oligonucleotide (CpG) that stimulates the immune response. These functionalized core-shell nanoparticles are used as vaccines, where they enable efficient delivery of an antigen to target sites, tracking of the vaccines using non-invasive clinical imaging technology.

    2. Micro-/Nanometer Rough Structure of a Superhydrophobic Biodegradable Coating by Electrospraying for Initial Anti-Bioadhesion (pages 1314–1321)

      Changmin Hu, Shen Liu, Bin Li, Huilin Yang, Cunyi Fan and Wenguo Cui

      Article first published online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300021

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      A novel superhydrophobic biodegradable coating with micro-/nanometer rough structure, fabricated by co-electrospraying poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) and modified silica nanoparticles (MSNs), exhibits good anti-adhesion behavior towards bacteria and cells in the initial culturing phase, which makes it a promising technology for preparing medical device coatings.

  7. Full Papers

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    1. In Vivo Treatment of Propionibacterium acnes Infection with Liposomal Lauric Acids (pages 1322–1328)

      Dissaya Pornpattananangkul, Victoria Fu, Soracha Thamphiwatana, Li Zhang, Michael Chen, James Vecchio, Weiwei Gao, Chun-Ming Huang and Liangfang Zhang

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300002

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      This article reports the development and in vivo evaluation of liposomal lauric acids (LipoLA) as a new, effective, and safe nanotherapeutic agent for the treatment of Propionibacterium acnes infection. Using a mouse ear model, topically applying LipoLA in a gel form onto the infectious site results in completely killing the bacteria without inducing acute toxicity to normal skin.

    2. Fully Biodegradable Airway Stents Using Amino Alcohol-Based Poly(ester amide) Elastomers (pages 1329–1336)

      Jane Wang, Kyle G. Boutin, Omar Abdulhadi, Lyndia D. Personnat, Tarek Shazly, Robert Langer, Colleen L. Channick and Jeffrey T. Borenstein

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200348

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      A bioresorbable airway stent that would eliminate the current requirement for surgical removal after use is reported. This new stent, made of bioresorbable APS elastomer, is designed with mechanical properties comparable to current silicone stents, made of a novel bioresorbable elastomer, APS, which has a highly tunable stiffness, degradation rate, and a triggered degradation mechanism. Initial results of the fabrication, degradation properties, and mechanical properties of these prototype stents are reported.

    3. Targeting Hepatic Cancer Cells with PEGylated Dendrimers Displaying N-Acetylgalactosamine and SP94 Peptide Ligands (pages 1337–1350)

      Scott H. Medina, Gopinath Tiruchinapally, Maxim V. Chevliakov, Yasemin Yuksel Durmaz, Rachell N. Stender, William D. Ensminger, Donna S. Shewach and Mohamed E. H. ElSayed

      Article first published online: 3 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200406

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      Design of targeted PEGylated G5 dendrimers loaded with a chemotherapeutic agent: PEG is coupled to G5 and functionalized with NAcGal sugar molecules or SP94 peptide targeting ligands. NAcGal- and SP94-functionalized PEGylated G5 particles bind to their specific receptors expressed on the surface of hepatic cancer cells triggering receptor-mediated endocytosis, followed by PEG shedding and release of the loaded chemotherapeutic agent.

    4. Enzyme-Coated Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as Efficient Antibacterial Agents In Vivo (pages 1351–1360)

      Li-li Li and Hao Wang

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300051

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      Efficient antibacterial agents in vitro and in vivo: Lys-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs⊂Lys) with bacterial targetability and adhesive capabilities show five-fold enhanced antibacterial activity in vitro and over two-fold antibacterial efficacy in the intestines of mice, as compared to controls.

    5. Ex Vivo Human Trabecular Bone Model for Biocompatibility Evaluation of Calcium Phosphate Composites Modified with Spray Dried Biodegradable Microspheres (pages 1361–1369)

      Julia Schnieders, Uwe Gbureck, Oliver Germershaus, Marita Kratz, David B. Jones and Thomas Kissel

      Article first published online: 9 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200390

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      The evaluation of biocompatibility is an important step in the development of novel biomaterials. In the case of bone cements, such biocompatibility studies are either based on cell culture experiments or on in vivo experiments. This article presents evaluation of biocompatibility of a composite composed of bone cement and microparticulate drug delivery system in an ex vivo trabecular bone model. The presented ex vivo model is a potential alternative to animal testing with improved relevance compared to cell culture testing.

    6. Dimeric Gold Nanoparticle Assemblies as Tags for SERS-Based Cancer Detection (pages 1370–1376)

      A. Swarnapali D. S. Indrasekara, Bryan J. Paladini, Dominik J. Naczynski, Valentin Starovoytov, Prabhas V. Moghe and Laura Fabris

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200370

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      Dimers of gold nanoparticles are employed to build surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based tags. The nanoparticles are held together by a small Raman-active molecular linker and surface-functionalized with stabilizing polyethylene glycol, fluorescent dyes, and cell-specific targeting moieties. Upon incubation with cancerous cells, the tags demonstrate high sensitivity at low incubation times, high selectivity, retained activity upon endocytosis, low cytotoxicity, and more effective tumor phenotype detection compared to traditional fluorescence- based approaches.

    7. Enantiopure Chiral Poly(glycerol methacrylate) Self-Assembled Monolayers Knock Down Protein Adsorption and Cell Adhesion (pages 1377–1387)

      Zheng Li, Alexander Köwitsch, Guoying Zhou, Thomas Groth, Bodo Fuhrmann, Marcus Niepel, Elkin Amado and Jörg Kressler

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200402

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      Grafting of enantiopure chiral poly(glycerol methacrylate) onto gold effectively blocks adhesion of THP-1 cells. In contrast, broad cell spreading is observed on a bare surface, and a weak cell adhesion on a racemic self-assembled monolayer. The dissimilar cell repulsion of enantiopure and racemic coatings is due to a higher hydration of the former, an indirect result of chiral ordered conformations adopted by these enantiopure polymers.

    8. The Role of Electrostatics and Temperature on Morphological Transitions of Hydrogel Nanostructures Self-Assembled by Peptide Amphiphiles Via Molecular Dynamics Simulations (pages 1388–1400)

      Iris W. Fu, Cade B. Markegard, Brian K. Chu and Hung D. Nguyen

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200400

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      Using a novel coarse-grained peptide/polymer model, large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are performed to examine spontaneous self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles resulting in the formation of nanostructures of various sizes and shapes as a function of the electrostatics and temperature. Different self-assembly mechanisms are deciphered and a phase diagram delineating regions of morphological transitions at different solvent conditions is constructed.

    9. Host Responses in Human Skin After Conventional Intradermal Injection or Microneedle Administration of Virus-Like-Particle Influenza Vaccine (pages 1401–1410)

      Marc Pearton, Daniela Pirri, Sang-Moo Kang, Richard W. Compans and James C. Birchall

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300006

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      Excised human skin responds to influenza virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines delivered via intradermal (ID) or coated microneedle (MN) injection. Microarray heat maps highlight changes in expression of genes responsible for key immunomodulatory processes and viral response, including cell recruitment, activation, migration, and T cell interaction. Morphological changes in Langerhans cells at the site of antigen deposition permit cell migration through the skin epidermis.

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