Advanced Healthcare Materials

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 2

February, 2013

Volume 2, Issue 2

Pages 233–378

  1. Cover Picture

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    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
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    9. Communications
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    11. Full Papers
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      Cellular Microenvironments: A Versatile Approach to Engineering Biomolecule-Presenting Cellular Microenvironments (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 2/2013) (page 233)

      Philipp S. Lienemann, Maria Karlsson, Ana Sala, Hanna M. Wischhusen, Franz E. Weber, Roland Zimmermann, Wilfried Weber, Matthias P. Lutolf and Martin Ehrbar

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370006

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      Biomimetic hydrogels are engineered to mimic extracellular microenvironments, as reported by Martin Ehrbar and co-workers on page 292. The cover image shows schematically how these matrices can selectively capture proteins from solution and present them to target cells in close proximity, triggering a desired cellular response.

  2. Inside Front Cover

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    9. Communications
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      Stem Cells: Phenotypic and Transcriptional Modulation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Induced by Nano/Microfabrication Materials (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 2/2013) (page 234)

      Ken-ichiro Kamei, Yoshikazu Hirai, Momoko Yoshioka, Yoshihide Makino, Qinghua Yuan, Minako Nakajima, Yong Chen and Osamu Tabata

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370007

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      Polymer-based microfabrication materials such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and photoresists (PRs) permit the creation of nano/microstructured substrates that enable the direct control of the cellular functions and phenotypes of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), but their biocompatibility and effects on hPSCs are poorly understood. On page 287, Osamu Tabata, Kenichiro Kamei, and co-workers reveal that the tested materials preferentially direct hPSCs towards differentiation. The image depicts how PRs (yellow), PDMS (light blue) and glass (white) influence the capability of hPSC differentiation into various tissues, such as muscle, heart and neurons.

  3. Back Cover

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      Drug Delivery: Efficient, pH-Triggered Drug Delivery Using a pH-Responsive DNA-Conjugated Gold Nanoparticle (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 2/2013) (page 380)

      Lei Song, Vincent H.B. Ho, Chun Chen, Zhongqiang Yang, Dongsheng Liu, Rongjun Chen and Dejian Zhou

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370008

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      A novel pH-responsive DNA–gold nanoparticle conjugate that has high drug load, resists non-specific serum protein adsorption and has high endocytotic cellular uptake is developed by Dejian Zhou, Rongjun Chen, and co-workers on page 275. Upon acidification in intracellular endosomes/lysosomes, the formation of intramolecular i-motif by the pH-responsive DNA leads to efficient, pH-triggered release of the anticancer drugs inside cancer cells, and hence high cytotoxicity.

  4. Masthead

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      Masthead: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 2/2013)

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370009

  5. Contents

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      Contents: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 2/2013) (pages 235–240)

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370010

  6. Editorial

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  7. Review

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    1. Carbon-Based Nanomaterials for Tissue Engineering (pages 244–260)

      Sook Hee Ku, Minah Lee and Chan Beum Park

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200307

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      Carbon nanomaterials, such as graphene and carbon nanotubes, present new opportunities for tissue engineering applications because of their unique physicochemical properties. This Review summarizes recent studies on the interaction between carbon-based nanomaterials and mammalian cells, such as cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation into osteo- or neural- lineages on graphene- or CNT-based substrates.

  8. Communications

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    1. Construction of 3D, Layered Skin, Microsized Tissues by Using Cell Beads for Cellular Function Analysis (pages 261–265)

      Yuya Morimoto, Risa Tanaka and Shoji Takeuchi

      Article first published online: 21 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200189

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      Microsized skin cell beads consisting of 3D layered structures with epidermal and dermal cells have been fabricated. The beads are monodisperse, type-I collagen beads encapsulating dermal cells and covered by epidermal cells. The beads can be used in individual analyses of cellular functions and respond to chemical stimulation.

    2. An Automated Process for Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Thin Films on Viable Cell Aggregates (pages 266–270)

      Joseph M. Mets, John T. Wilson, Wanxing Cui and Elliot L. Chaikof

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200148

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      An automated process for modifying the surface of pancreatic islets grows uniform polyelectrolyte multilayer thin films, eliminating user variability associated with previous manual methods. Machine vision feedback allows for tight control of small fluid volumes, maintaining an islet microenvironment. This process is adaptable to other fragile micrometer-scale particle systems.

    3. The Electrical Detection of Lead Ions Using Gold-Nanoparticle- and DNAzyme-Functionalized Graphene Device (pages 271–274)

      Yanqin Wen, Fabien Yi Li, Xiaochen Dong, Jun Zhang, Qihua Xiong and Peng Chen

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200220

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      An electronic Pb2+ sensor, with high sensitivity and specificity, was developed based on DNAzyme- and gold-nanoparticle-functionalized graphene transistor.

    4. Efficient, pH-Triggered Drug Delivery Using a pH-Responsive DNA-Conjugated Gold Nanoparticle (pages 275–280)

      Lei Song, Vincent H.B. Ho, Chun Chen, Zhongqiang Yang, Dongsheng Liu, Rongjun Chen and Dejian Zhou

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200112

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      A novel drug nanocarrier that offers simple, direct, native form drug loading without involving any chemical modification and/or coupling step has been developed by using a pH-responsive DNA–gold nanoparticle conjugate. It can resist non-specific adsorption of serum proteins upon PEGylation and can provide efficient delivery and pH-triggered release of anticancer drugs to cancer cells, leading to high cytotoxicity.

    5. Folic Acid-Modified Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Cellular and Nuclear Targeted Drug Delivery (pages 281–286)

      Fabiola Porta, Gerda E. M. Lamers, Jess Morrhayim, Antonia Chatzopoulou, Marcel Schaaf, Hans den Dulk, Claude Backendorf, Jeffrey I. Zink and Alexander Kros

      Article first published online: 28 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200176

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      Folic acid-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles are designed for cellular and nuclear targeted drug delivery. Camptothecin is efficiently delivered to human cancer cells resulting in apoptosis without premature leakage. The folic acid moiety is an integral part of a rotaxane structure, which locks the drug molecules in the pores, preventing premature release. Upon folate receptor-mediated cell uptake, esterases cleave the rotaxane valves and camptothecin is released, resulting in apoptosis.

    6. Phenotypic and Transcriptional Modulation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Induced by Nano/Microfabrication Materials (pages 287–291)

      Ken-ichiro Kamei, Yoshikazu Hirai, Momoko Yoshioka, Yoshihide Makino, Qinghua Yuan, Minako Nakajima, Yong Chen and Osamu Tabata

      Article first published online: 28 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200283

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      Microfabrication materials such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and photoresists (PRs) permit the creation of nano/microstructured substrates that enable the direct control of the cellular functions and phenotypes of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). The multiple analyses of cellular phenotypes and gene expression demonstrate that microfabrication materials preferentially direct hPSCs towards differentiation.

    7. A Versatile Approach to Engineering Biomolecule-Presenting Cellular Microenvironments (pages 292–296)

      Philipp S. Lienemann, Maria Karlsson, Ana Sala, Hanna M. Wischhusen, Franz E. Weber, Roland Zimmermann, Wilfried Weber, Matthias P. Lutolf and Martin Ehrbar

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200280

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      By combining a novel protein-capture hydrogel with state-of-the-art mammalian recombinant protein production, cellular microenvironments are fabricated that locally instruct in-vitro cell behavior through selective presentation of the expressed proteins.

    8. Multifunctional Hybrid Nanocarriers Consisting of Supramolecular Polymers and Quantum Dots for Simultaneous Dual Therapeutics Delivery and Cellular Imaging (pages 297–301)

      Yun-Long Wu, Hui Yin, Feng Zhao and Jun Li

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200183

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      A novel multifunctional hybrid nanocarrier consisting of a red fluorescence quantum dot core and a star-shaped cationic β-cyclodextrin polymer shell is demonstrated. Chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel is supramolecularly preloaded into the nanocarrier, which co-delivers the drug and DNA with an enhanced gene expression, while the quantum dot core allows simultaneous cellular imaging using laser scanning confocal microscopy.

    9. Hierarchically Porous Chitosan–PEG–Silica Biohybrid: Synthesis and Rapid Cell Adsorption (pages 302–305)

      Changkui Fu, Shiqi Wang, Lin Feng, Xiaoqi Liu, Yan Ji, Lei Tao, Shuxi Li and Yen Wei

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200166

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      A hierarchically porous chitosan–PEG–silica (CPS) biohybrid has been prepared in a facile synthesis through in situ silica polycondensation within a chitosan–PEG hydrogel. This organic–inorganic composite is almost non-toxic and has quick cell-adsorptivity. As a result of its unique hierarchical structure and excellent biocompatibility, this CPS biohybrid has the potential to be used as a new biomaterial.

    10. The Next Step in Biomimetic Material Design: Poly-LacNAc-Mediated Reversible Exposure of Extra Cellular Matrix Components (pages 306–311)

      Meike V. Beer, Claudia Rech, Peter Gasteier, Birgit Sauerzapfe, Jochen Salber, Andrea Ewald, Martin Möller, Lothar Elling and Jürgen Groll

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200080

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      Herein is demonstrated that a biomimetic, in-vivo-like presentation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as fibronectin, laminin, and collagen IV mediated by a fully functional poly-sugar (polyLacNAc)–lectin complex can be achieved on a biomaterials surface. Cells recognize and bind to these immobilized proteins and can, due to the reversible protein presentation, remodel initially presented ECM proteins.

  9. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
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      Managing Magnetic Nanoparticle Aggregation and Cellular Uptake: a Precondition for Efficient Stem-Cell Differentiation and MRI Tracking (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 2/2013) (page 312)

      Delphine Fayol, Nathalie Luciani, Lenaic Lartigue, Florence Gazeau and Claire Wilhelm

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370011

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      The influence of the state of magnetic nanoparticle aggregation and the amount of internalized iron on capacity for stem-cell differentiation is examined by Claire Wilhelm and co-workers on page 313. The image shows stem cells covered by rod-shaped aggregates of magnetic nanoparticles, and observed by optical microscopy (background), electron microscopy (top left quadrant), and magnetophoresis (bottom). High cellular iron contents are found to have a deleterious effect on the differentiation pathway of cartilage formation. STEM

  10. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Review
    9. Communications
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    11. Full Papers
    1. Managing Magnetic Nanoparticle Aggregation and Cellular Uptake: a Precondition for Efficient Stem-Cell Differentiation and MRI Tracking (pages 313–325)

      Delphine Fayol, Nathalie Luciani, Lenaic Lartigue, Florence Gazeau and Claire Wilhelm

      Article first published online: 1 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200294

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      The way nanoparticles interact with stem cells influences their uptake, differentiation capacity, and subsequent fate in the organism. Here, the influence of the state of magnetic nanoparticle aggregation and the amount of internalized iron on the capacity for stem-cell differentiation is examined. Magnetophoresis, a technique to quantify magnetic labeling of individual cells, is used to establish the true cellular magnetic charge, required for a realistic evaluation of any harmful effects to cells. Importantly, high cellular iron contents are found to have a deleterious effect on the differentiation pathway of cartilage formation.

    2. Biomimetic Calcium Carbonate Concentric Microgrooves with Tunable Widths for Promoting MC3T3-E1 Cell Functions (pages 326–333)

      Xiaohui Wu and Shanfeng Wang

      Article first published online: 18 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200205

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      Biomimetic, self-assembled calcium carbonate (CaCO3) concentric microgrooves with groove widths of 5.0 and 10 μm are fabricated by simply controlling incubation temperature. Mouse MC3T3-E1 cells are cultured on flat and microgrooved substrates of CaCO3 and their adhesion, spreading, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and calcium content are remarkably enhanced by the microgrooves, in particular, the narrower ones.

    3. Micropatterning Different Cell Types with Microarray Amplification of Natural Directional Persistence (pages 334–342)

      Kyu-Shik Mun, Girish Kumar, Carlos C. Co and Chia-Chi Ho

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200141

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      Spatially defined patterns of different cells are formed by directing their migration along preset paths by microarray amplification of natural directional persistence (MANDIP). MANDIP requires no external gradients or fields and enables the self-propelled migration of an arbitrary number of cells along arbitrary preset paths with micrometer precision over large areas.

    4. A Novel Method to Precisely Assemble Loose Nanofiber Structures for Regenerative Medicine Applications (pages 343–351)

      Vince Beachley, Eleni Katsanevakis, Ning Zhang and Xuejun Wen

      Article first published online: 15 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200125

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      A technology designed to collect and assemble aligned electrospun nanofiber arrays using automated parallel tracks is described. This technique generates the continuous production of stabilized uniform aligned nanofiber arrays directly from an electrospinning jet. The potential of this technology for fabricating polymer nanofiber devices suitable for biomedical applications is demonstrated through the assembly of several complex nanofiber structures.

    5. Small and Stable Phosphorylcholine Zwitterionic Quantum Dots for Weak Nonspecific Phagocytosis and Effective Tat Peptide Functionalization (pages 352–360)

      Xiangsheng Liu, Huiguang Zhu, Qiao Jin, Wenbo Zhou, Vicki L. Colvin and Jian Ji

      Article first published online: 14 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200210

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      Stable and water-soluble quantum dots (QDs) are prepared with amphiphilic phosphorylcholine by a quick and complete phase-exchange reaction. The zwitterionic QDs can effectively minimize cell uptake by phagocytic macrophages. Furthermore, Tat peptide conjugation significantly enhances cell internalization of QDs.

    6. Small-Diameter Silk Vascular Grafts (3 mm Diameter) with a Double-Raschel Knitted Silk Tube Coated with Silk Fibroin Sponge (pages 361–368)

      Derya Aytemiz, Wataru Sakiyama, Yu Suzuki, Naoki Nakaizumi, Ryou Tanaka, Yoko Ogawa, Yoshihide Takagi, Yasumoto Nakazawa and Tetsuo Asakura

      Article first published online: 27 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200227

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      Silk fibroin vascular graft with 3 mm diameter, which can be used for the coronary arteries or lower extremity arteries, is prepared. Sufficient strength, proper elasticity, protection from loose ends in the implantation process, low water permeability, and relatively large compliance are obtained. These excellent physical properties make it possible for silk fibroin grafts to be implanted in a canine model.

    7. Evaluation of Biocompatibility and Administration Site Reactogenicity of Polyanhydride-Particle-Based Platform for Vaccine Delivery (pages 369–378)

      Lucas Huntimer, Amanda E. Ramer-Tait, Latrisha K. Petersen, Kathleen A. Ross, Katherine A. Walz, Chong Wang, Jesse Hostetter, Balaji Narasimhan and Michael J. Wannemuehler

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200181

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      Polyanhydride nanoparticles induce less inflammation following parenteral administration than do traditional adjuvants. This study demonstrates that polyanhydride nanoparticles disseminate to multiple tissue sites and persist in the host for at least 12 weeks without the induction of adverse tissue reactions. These data offer an initial standard for translating polyanhydride nanomaterials into use as vaccine- or drug-delivery platforms for humans and animals.

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