Advanced Healthcare Materials

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 3

March, 2013

Volume 2, Issue 3

Pages 381–507

  1. Cover Picture

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    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
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    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
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      Cell Patterning: Patterned Three-Dimensional Encapsulation of Embryonic Stem Cells using Dielectrophoresis and Stereolithography (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 3/2013) (page 381)

      Piyush Bajaj, Daniel Marchwiany, Carlos Duarte and Rashid Bashir

      Version of Record online: 6 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370012

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      The integration of dielectrophoresis (DEP) with stereolithography (SL) apparatus for the spatial patterning of cells on custom-made gold micro-electrodes is reported by Rashid Bashir and co-workers on page 450. After patterning, the cells are encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels of different stiffnesses. This robust and flexible in vitro platform can enable various applications in stem cell differentiation and tissue engineering by mimicking elements of the native 3D in vivo cellular micro-environment.

  2. Inside Front Cover

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    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
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      Imaging: Conjugated Polymer Amplified Far-Red/Near-Infrared Fluorescence from Nanoparticles with Aggregation-Induced Emission Characteristics for Targeted In Vivo Imaging (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 3/2013) (page 382)

      Dan Ding, Kai Li, Wei Qin, Ruoyu Zhan, Yong Hu, Jianzhao Liu, Ben Zhong Tang and Bin Liu

      Version of Record online: 6 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370013

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      Bin Liu and co-workers report on page 500 a fluorescence-amplified far-red/near-infrared (FR/NIR) probe by co-encapsulation of a conjugated polymer donor and a fluorogen acceptor with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics into biocompatible bovine serum albumin (BSA) matrix. These probes allow for targeted in vitro and in vivo cancer imaging with high contrast and in a selective manner.

  3. Back Cover

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    4. Back Cover
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      Graphene Oxide: Purified Graphene Oxide Dispersions Lack In Vitro Cytotoxicity and In Vivo Pathogenicity (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 3/2013) (page 512)

      Hanene Ali-Boucetta, Dimitrios Bitounis, Rahul Raveendran-Nair, Ania Servant, Jeroen Van den Bossche and Kostas Kostarelos

      Version of Record online: 6 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370014

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      Preparation of a high dispersibility graphene oxide (GO) that can be reliably used in biological investigations is reported by Kostas Kostarelos and co-workers on page 433. Exposure of cells and tissue to the graphene oxide indicated a lack of cytotoxic responses in human cell cultures (in vitro) and after injection to living animals (in vivo).

  4. Masthead

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      Masthead: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 3/2013)

      Version of Record online: 6 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370015

  5. Contents

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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
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    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
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  6. Review

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    1. Stimulus-Sensitive Polymeric Nanoparticles and Their Applications as Drug and Gene Carriers (pages 388–417)

      Yi Li, Guang Hui Gao and Doo Sung Lee

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200313

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      Stimulus-sensitive polymeric nanoparticles are able to efficiently deliver therapeutics and imaging agents to their sites of action. The various nanostructures of polymers in aqueous solutions provide a lot of options to develop suitable delivery systems for specific therapeutics. This Review introduces the preparation and in vitro and in vivo application of intelligent drug-delivery systems based on recent advances in the field of drug delivery.

  7. Communications

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    1. Mimicking the Biological Ligand–Receptor Principle for Universal Target Gene Delivery Mediated by Avidin–Biotin Interaction (pages 418–421)

      Wei Qu, Shan Ren, Ying Kuang, Xue-Jun Jiang, Ren-Xi Zhuo and Xian-Zheng Zhang

      Version of Record online: 8 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200206

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      A facile and flexible targeting gene-delivery strategy is reported by mimicking the biological ligand–receptor principle based on avidin–biotin interaction. In vitro and in vivo investigations demonstrate that this strategy provides a simple, but universal alternative for potential target gene delivery as well as drug delivery.

    2. Hierarchical Fibrillar Scaffolds Obtained by Non-conventional Layer-By-Layer Electrostatic Self-Assembly (pages 422–427)

      Sara M. Oliveira, Tiago H. Silva, Rui L. Reis and João F. Mano

      Version of Record online: 8 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200204

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      A new application of layer-by-layer assembly is presented, able to create nano/micro fibrils or nanocoatings inside 3D scaffolds using non-fibrillar polyelectrolytes for tissue-engineering applications. This approach shows promise for developing advanced scaffolds with controlled nano/micro environments, and nature and architectures similar to the natural extracellular matrix, leading to improved biological performance.

    3. Protein-Engineered Injectable Hydrogel to Improve Retention of Transplanted Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (pages 428–432)

      Andreina Parisi-Amon, Widya Mulyasasmita, Cindy Chung and Sarah C. Heilshorn

      Version of Record online: 28 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200293

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      Improved retention of transplanted stem cells is achieved through minimally invasive delivery in MITCH, a mixing-induced two-component hydrogel that was engineered to possess shear-thinning and self-healing thixotropic properties. MITCH, an ideal injectable cell-delivery vehicle, supports 3D stem-cell culture, resulting in high cell viability and physiologically relevant cell morphology.

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. Purified Graphene Oxide Dispersions Lack In Vitro Cytotoxicity and In Vivo Pathogenicity (pages 433–441)

      Hanene Ali-Boucetta, Dimitrios Bitounis, Rahul Raveendran-Nair, Ania Servant, Jeroen Van den Bossche and Kostas Kostarelos

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200248

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      The preparation of high-purity graphene oxide (GO), with high aqueous dispersibility, that can be reliably used in biological investigations is described. Characterization of pure GO compared with conventional GO prepared by the Hummers method is offered. Purified GO shows lack of cytotoxic responses in vitro and no inflammatory responses or granuloma formation after intraperitoneal injection of living animals (in vivo).

    2. A Bio-inspired Platform to Modulate Myogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Through Focal Adhesion Regulation (pages 442–449)

      Haiyang Yu, Chor Yong Tay, Mintu Pal, Wen Shing Leong, Huaqiong Li, Hai Li, Feng Wen, David Tai Leong and Lay Poh Tan

      Version of Record online: 1 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200142

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      This work demonstrates for the first time that it is possible to induce human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) differentiation by regulating the focal adhesions (FAs) without any biochemical factors. It shows that there is a synergistic effect between FAs regulation and matrix stiffness that results in a more specific and highly up-regulated myogenesis. It is also found that there is an interaction within the different physical stimulants which can only be realized if they are combined at the optimum level.

    3. Patterned Three-Dimensional Encapsulation of Embryonic Stem Cells using Dielectrophoresis and Stereolithography (pages 450–458)

      Piyush Bajaj, Daniel Marchwiany, Carlos Duarte and Rashid Bashir

      Version of Record online: 27 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200318

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      Dielectrophoresis is combined with stereolithography to pattern embryonic stem cells and their clusters in three-dimensional hydrogels of physiologically relevant stiffnesses. This platform takes us one step closer to mimicking the in vivo micro-scale tissue architecture where the cells have a high degree of spatial control while being present in 3D.

    4. Co-encapsulation of Biodegradable Nanoparticles with Silicon Quantum Dots and Quercetin for Monitored Delivery (pages 459–466)

      Qi Wang, Yongping Bao, Jayshree Ahire and Yimin Chao

      Version of Record online: 26 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200178

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      Co-encapsulation of both quercetin and silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) in poly (ethylene glycol)-block-polylactide (PEG–PLA) nanoparticles can be used for simultaneous in vitro imaging and improving the biocompatibility of quercetin. PEG–PLA consists of hydrophilic PEG block and hydrophobic PLA block. The results have demonstrated the potential of monitoring anticancer drug delivery.

  9. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Subtle Changes to Polymer Structure and Degradation Mechanism Enable Highly Effective Nanoparticles for siRNA and DNA Delivery to Human Brain Cancer (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 3/2013) (page 467)

      Stephany Y. Tzeng and Jordan J. Green

      Version of Record online: 6 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370017

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      Polymeric nanoparticles are engineered to deliver siRNA and DNA to human brain cancer cells, as reported by Jordan J. Green and Stephany Y. Tzeng on page 468. Changes to polymer structure, such as to molecular weight, hydrophobicity, polymer endgroup, and degradable linkages, tune delivery in a manner that is often dependent on the type of nucleic acid cargo being delivered. Hydrolytically degradable polymers effectively deliver DNA whereas bioreducible degrading polymers effectively deliver siRNA.

  10. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. Subtle Changes to Polymer Structure and Degradation Mechanism Enable Highly Effective Nanoparticles for siRNA and DNA Delivery to Human Brain Cancer (pages 468–480)

      Stephany Y. Tzeng and Jordan J. Green

      Version of Record online: 26 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200257

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      Over 200 nanoparticle formulations based on poly(beta-amino esters) are utilized to evaluate the effect of polymer structure and nucleic acid structure on gene delivery. Highly effective polymeric nanoparticles are created to deliver siRNA and DNA to human brain cancer cells. Polymer properties, including polymer structure and degradation mechanism, are key for successful delivery.

    2. PEGylated Peptide Based Reductive Polycations as Efficient Nonviral Gene Vectors (pages 481–489)

      Juan Yang, Hui-Yuan Wang, Wen-Jie Yi, Yu-Hui Gong, Xiang Zhou, Ren-Xi Zhuo and Xian-Zheng Zhang

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200154

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      A series of reducible polycations (RPCs) based on PEGylated peptides, i.e., PolyHK6H, PolyHK6H-mPEG1, PolyHK6H-mPEG2, and PolyHK6H-mPEG3, with different poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) contents, are synthesized. It is found that RPCs with an appropriate PEG amount have high capacity to bind and condense plasmid DNA (pDNA). PolyHK6H-mPEG1 exhibits comparable transfection efficiency in serum-free medium and higher transfection efficiency in serum-supplemented medium compared with 25 kDa polyethyleneimine (PEI).

    3. Bioactive Glass Foam Scaffolds are Remodelled by Osteoclasts and Support the Formation of Mineralized Matrix and Vascular Networks In Vitro (pages 490–499)

      Swati Midha, Wouter van den Bergh, Taek B. Kim, Peter D. Lee, Julian R. Jones and Christopher A. Mitchell

      Version of Record online: 22 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200140

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      70S30C sol–gel bioactive glasses induce murine MC3T3-E1 pre-osteogenic cells to proliferate in response to ionic dissolution products and promote surface remodelling by deposition of mineralized osteoid in vitro. C7 macrophages also differentiate into TRAP+ve osteoclasts forming distinctive resorption pits and endothelial cells form tube-like structures. Thus 70S30C foams are excellent candidates for vascularised bone regeneration studies.

    4. Conjugated Polymer Amplified Far-Red/Near-Infrared Fluorescence from Nanoparticles with Aggregation-Induced Emission Characteristics for Targeted In Vivo Imaging (pages 500–507)

      Dan Ding, Kai Li, Wei Qin, Ruoyu Zhan, Yong Hu, Jianzhao Liu, Ben Zhong Tang and Bin Liu

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200243

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fluorescence-amplified far-red/near-infrared (FR/NIR) probes have been synthesized by co-encapsulation of conjugated polymer donor and aggregation-induced emission fluorogen acceptor into bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoparticles (NPs) with surface arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide functionalization, which allow targeted cellular imaging and in vivo tumor diagnosis in a high contrast and selective manner.

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