Advanced Healthcare Materials

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 7

July, 2013

Volume 2, Issue 7

Pages 921–1062

  1. Cover Picture

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      Cell Assays: Surface-Micromachined Microfiltration Membranes for Efficient Isolation and Functional Immunophenotyping of Subpopulations of Immune Cells (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 7/2013) (page 921)

      Weiqiang Chen, Nien-Tsu Huang, Boram Oh, Raymond H. W. Lam, Rong Fan, Timothy T. Cornell, Thomas P. Shanley, Katsuo Kurabayashi and Jianping Fu

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370035

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      An integrated microfluidic immunophenotyping platform is developed by Jianping Fu, Katsuo Kurabayashi, and co-workers on page 965 for rapid and efficient isolation, enrichment, stimulation and functional immunophenotyping of subpopulations of immune cells. Such an innovative tool will allow comprehensive and systems-level immunomonitoring to define and characterize the “immune status” of healthy individuals and patients, critical for clinical interventions and managements of patients with immune system disorders.

  2. Inside Front Cover

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      Cancer Therapy: Gold Nanoparticle-Loaded Neural Stem Cells for Photothermal Ablation of Cancer (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 7/2013) (page 922)

      Kenna Schnarr, Rachael Mooney, Yiming Weng, Donghong Zhao, Elizabeth Garcia, Brian Armstrong, Alexander J. Annala, Seung U. Kim, Karen S. Aboody and Jacob M. Berlin

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370036

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      Neural stem cells carrying internalized gold nanorods home in on cancer. Stimulating the nanorods with a near infrared laser causes them to heat up and kill surrounding cancer cells. The laser alone is non-harmful so cell killing only occurs where the stem cells have taken the nanorods. Further details can be found in the article by Jacob M. Berlin, Karen S. Aboody, and co-workers on page 976.

  3. Back Cover

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      Biomaterials: Nanowell-Trapped Charged Ligand-Bearing Nanoparticle Surfaces: A Novel Method of Enhancing Flow-Resistant Cell Adhesion (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 7/2013) (page 1064)

      Phat L. Tran, Jessica R. Gamboa, Katherine E. McCracken, Mark R. Riley, Marvin J. Slepian and Jeong-Yeol Yoon

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370037

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      Jeong-Yeol Yoon, Marvin J. Slepian, and co-workers describe on page 1019 a novel method utilizing nanofabrication techniques to create surfaces with enhanced endothelial adhesion and retention under flow. The system utilizes nano texture, charge, and ligands all combined together, uniquely assembled on the substrata surface, to create ensemble nanotextured surfaces. This new method may be of particular utility for enhancing flow-resistant endothelialization of cardiovascular devices.

  4. Masthead

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      Masthead: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 7/2013)

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370038

  5. Contents

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      Contents: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 7/2013) (pages 923–928)

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370039

  6. Communications

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    1. Purified Neurons can Survive on Peptide-Free Graphene Layers (pages 929–933)

      Amel Bendali, Lucas H. Hess, Max Seifert, Valerie Forster, Anne-Fleur Stephan, Jose A. Garrido and Serge Picaud

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200347

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      The excellent cytocompatibility of single-layer CVD graphene is demonstrated by showing that primary adult retinal ganglion cells can directly survive on its surface without any supporting glial layer or protein coating. These results confirm the great potential of graphene as a biocompatible material for interfacing neurons, opening a new route for the development of a novel generation of flexible and high-sensitive neural prostheses.

    2. Efficacy of BMP-2 Delivery from Natural Protein Based Polymeric Particles (pages 934–939)

      Pujiang Shi, Kelei Chen and James C. H. Goh

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200281

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      Natural protein based nano-/microparticles are manufactured and functionalized by BMP-2. The functionalized particles can associate with mesenchymal stem cells actively, boost differentiation, alleviate cytotoxicity and perform controlled release.

    3. Targeting Dendritic Cells: The Role of Specific Receptors in the Internalization of Polymer Capsules (pages 940–944)

      Justine D. Mintern, Chiori Percival, Marloes M. J. Kamphuis, Wei Jin Chin, Frank Caruso and Angus P. R. Johnston

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200441

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      Dendritic cells (DCs) are an important target for vaccine delivery. It is shown that antibody functionalized polymer capsules can effectively target DCs; however, the internalization is highly dependent on the specific receptor targeted. This work highlights the importance of considering factors such as how the antibody/capsule is internalized, rather than just the target specificity.

    4. Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes Leads to Changes in the Cellular Biomechanics (pages 945–951)

      Chenbo Dong, Michael L. Kashon, David Lowry, Jonathan S. Dordick, Steven H. Reynolds, Yon Rojanasakul, Linda M. Sargent and Cerasela Zoica Dinu

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200430

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      Exposure to carbon nanotubes induces significant changes in cellular biomechanics. Using nanoindentation, it is observed that the exposed cells have significantly higher stiffness when compared to controls, especially at the nuclear region, and significant increases in surface area.

    5. Cu2–xSe Nanocrystals with Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance as Sensitive Contrast Agents for In Vivo Photoacoustic Imaging: Demonstration of Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping (pages 952–957)

      Xin Liu, Wing-Cheung Law, Mansik Jeon, Xianliang Wang, Maixian Liu, Chulhong Kim, Paras N. Prasad and Mark T. Swihart

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200388

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      The promise of a new nanomaterial, Cu2–xSe nanocrystals, as a contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging is demonstrated. The Cu2–xSe nanocrystals exhibit strong optical absorption at near infrared wavelengths that can efficiently penetrate tissue. In vivo photoacoustic tomography using this nanomaterial as the contrast agent provides clear three-dimensional resolution of a sentinel lymph node in a rat model.

    6. Ultrasmall Manganese Ferrite Nanoparticles as Positive Contrast Agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (pages 958–964)

      Zhen Li, Shu Xia Wang, Qiao Sun, Hong Li Zhao, Hao Lei, Min Bo Lan, Zhen Xiang Cheng, Xiao Lin Wang, Shi Xue Dou and Gao Qing (Max) Lu

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200340

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      Reducing ferromagnetic particle size is an important strategy to improve their positive effect on imaging through the suppression of their negative effect, demonstrated by ultrasmall manganese ferrite nanoparticles prepared from an environmentally-friendly aqueous route. These ultrasmall particles exhibit pronounced paramagnetic characteristics and nontoxicity, making them efficient T1-positive contrast agent and manganese contrast agents for manganese enhanced MRI.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Research News
    1. Surface-Micromachined Microfiltration Membranes for Efficient Isolation and Functional Immunophenotyping of Subpopulations of Immune Cells (pages 965–975)

      Weiqiang Chen, Nien-Tsu Huang, Boram Oh, Raymond H. W. Lam, Rong Fan, Timothy T. Cornell, Thomas P. Shanley, Katsuo Kurabayashi and Jianping Fu

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200378

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      An integrated microfluidic microfiltration platform containing a unique surface micromachined poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfiltration membrane (PMM) and microbeads conjugated with antibodies is reported for rapid, efficient and high-throughput on-chip isolation, enrichment, and stimulation of subpopulations of immune cells from blood specimens. Furthermore, the PMM-integrated microfiltration platform, coupled with a no-wash homogeneous chemiluminescence assay (“AlphaLISA”), allows rapid and sensitive on-chip immunophenotyping assays for subpopulations of immune cells isolated directly from minute quantities of blood samples.

    2. Gold Nanoparticle-Loaded Neural Stem Cells for Photothermal Ablation of Cancer (pages 976–982)

      Kenna Schnarr, Rachael Mooney, Yiming Weng, Donghong Zhao, Elizabeth Garcia, Brian Armstrong, Alexander J. Annala, Seung U. Kim, Karen S. Aboody and Jacob M. Berlin

      Article first published online: 17 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300003

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      Neural stem cells maintain their tumor tropism after internalizing gold nanorods. When exposed to a laser, the loaded cells heat up, destroying surrounding tumor cells.

    3. Affinity Based Multilayered Polymeric Self-Assemblies for Oral Wound Applications (pages 983–992)

      Sundar P. Authimoolam, David A. Puleo and Thomas D. Dziubla

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200375

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      In order to overcome the inadequacies in current oral mucosal treatment methods, a modular treatment strategy is proposed which utilizes biotin-streptavidin affinity linkages for developing multilayered polymeric self-assemblies. It is hypothesized that affinity based layer-by-layers (LBL) can be self-assembled through a series of mouth rinses over the oral wound surface, which will offer a desired regenerative treatment strategy through its stable barrier effects. Hence, evaluating the barrier stability of LBLs against harsh intraoral environment is a key requirement to validate its application in oral wounds.

    4. Surface-Mediated Release of a Small-Molecule Modulator of Bacterial Biofilm Formation: A Non-Bactericidal Approach to Inhibiting Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (pages 993–1000)

      Adam H. Broderick, Anthony S. Breitbach, Reto Frei, Helen E. Blackwell and David M. Lynn

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200334

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      Bacterial biofilms pose persistent and costly challenges in many healthcare contexts. A non-bactericidal approach to preventing biofilm formation in the human pathogen P. aeruginosa is reported. The approach is based on the gradual release of a potent, non-bactericidal inhibitor of biofilm growth from thin polymer coatings, and can inhibit biofilm formation on film-coated surfaces and adjacent uncoated interfaces by up to 90%. This small-molecule inhibitor is not toxic to mammalian cells at concentrations required for strong anti-biofilm activity, suggesting that this approach is suited for further investigation in biomedical contexts.

    5. Polymeric Systems Incorporating Plant Viral Nanoparticles for Tailored Release of Therapeutics (pages 1001–1007)

      Sara Honarbakhsh, Richard H. Guenther, Julie A. Willoughby, Steven A. Lommel and Behnam Pourdeyhimi

      Article first published online: 20 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200434

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      Therapeutic poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanofibrous matrices can trigger drug release through hybrid fabrication with plant viral nanoparticles (PVNs). PVNs comprise the native virus, Red clover necrotic mosaic virus, and a cancer therapeutic, doxorubicin. PVNs reversibly open and close with the appropriate environmental stimuli; the drug releases from the virus and diffuses through the polymeric matrix.

    6. Versatile Photochemical Surface Modification of Biopolyester Microfibrous Scaffolds with Photogenerated Silver Nanoparticles for Antibacterial Activity (pages 1008–1018)

      Davy-Louis Versace, Julien Ramier, Daniel Grande, Samir Abbad Andaloussi, Pierre Dubot, Nelly Hobeika, Jean-Pierre Malval, Jacques Lalevee, Estelle Renard and Valerie Langlois

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200269

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      Silver-containing PHBHV-g-PMAA microfibrous scaffolds with antibacterial activity are successfully engineered according to a sustainable “green chemistry” approach. It relies on a two-step procedure: UV photografting of poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) in aqueous media from the surface of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBHV) fibers via a “grafting from” method, followed by the complexation of the in situ photogenerated silver nanoparticles immobilized by carboxyl groups from tethered PMAA chains.

    7. Nanowell-Trapped Charged Ligand-Bearing Nanoparticle Surfaces: A Novel Method of Enhancing Flow-Resistant Cell Adhesion (pages 1019–1027)

      Phat L. Tran, Jessica R. Gamboa, Katherine E. McCracken, Mark R. Riley, Marvin J. Slepian and Jeong-Yeol Yoon

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200250

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      A novel method utilizing nanofabrication techniques is used to create surfaces with enhanced endothelial adhesion and retention under flow. The system utilizes nanotexture, charge, and ligands all combined together, uniquely assembled on the substrata surface, to create ensemble nanotextured surfaces. This system may be of particular utility for enhancing flow-resistant endothelialization of cardiovascular devices.

    8. Secondary Photocrosslinking of Injectable Shear-Thinning Dock-and-Lock Hydrogels (pages 1028–1036)

      Hoang D. Lu, Danielle E. Soranno, Christopher B. Rodell, Iris L. Kim and Jason A. Burdick

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200343

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      A two-component hydrogel based on a Dock-and-Lock self-assembling mechanism is engineered with photo-triggerable secondary crosslinks. Physical Dock-and-Lock hydrogels are based on specific molecular interactions between polypeptide components and are injectable and rapidly self-healing. Secondary crosslinked physical- chemical hydrogels have increased mechanical properties, slower erosion, and remain self-adhesive.

    9. Chitosan Electrodeposition for Microrobotic Drug Delivery (pages 1037–1044)

      Stefano Fusco, George Chatzipirpiridis, Kartik M. Sivaraman, Olgaç Ergeneman, Bradley J. Nelson and Salvador Pané

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200409

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      Chitosan drug loaded matrices are electrodeposited on conductive surfaces and modified by simple dip coating processes with an ionic crosslinker solution. Drug release is evaluated in different pH conditions mimicking possible changes due to local inflammation or disease. The method is intended to functionalize capsules for drug delivery into the eye.

    10. Development of Self-Assembling Mixed Protein Micelles with Temperature-Modulated Avidities (pages 1045–1055)

      Allyson S. C. Soon, Michael H. Smith, Emily S. Herman, L. Andrew Lyon and Thomas H. Barker

      Article first published online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200330

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      Protein-based mixed micelles with variable avidities to fibrinogen at different temperature regimes are reported. Such a system has potential drug delivery applications as a blood circulating depot that will only be released in situ upon a specific trigger such as temperature (in the current design), pH or oxidative stress.

  8. Research News

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    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
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    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
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    9. Research News
    1. Eyes on 3D-Current 3D Biomimetic Disease Concept Models and Potential Applications in Age-Related Macular Degeneration (pages 1056–1062)

      Beatrix Feigl and Dietmar Hutmacher

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200445

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      Current three dimensional culture models mimicking organ systems and disease concepts in vitro are reviewed. It is predicted that these models will become increasingly important for understanding pathomechanisms of disease, drug screening and testing. Advancements in combining engineered micro-environments with human cell lines that mimic retinal architecture may also allow the study of disease mechanisms such as those occurring in age-related macular degeneration, the most common cause of blindness in the Western World.

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