Advanced Healthcare Materials

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 8

August, 2013

Volume 2, Issue 8

Pages 1065–1178

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      High-Throughput Delivery: A Diamond Nanoneedle Array for Potential High-Throughput Intracellular Delivery (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 8/2013) (page 1065)

      Xianfeng Chen, Guangyu Zhu, Yang Yang, Beilei Wang, Li Yan, Kenneth Yin Zhang, Kenneth Kam-Wing Lo and Wenjun Zhang

      Version of Record online: 15 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370040

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      On page 1103, X. Chen, G. Zhu, W. Zhang, and co-workers present a dense diamond nanoneedle array capable of rapidly and conveniently delivering fluorescent probes and drugs to a large number of cells. This simple approach paves the way for potential high-throughput intracellular delivery of a range of molecules.

  2. Inside Front Cover

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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Review
    7. Communications
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    9. Frontispiece
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      Tissue Engineering: Bio-Origami Hydrogel Scaffolds Composed of Photocrosslinked PEG Bilayers (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 8/2013) (page 1066)

      Mustapha Jamal, Sachin S. Kadam, Rui Xiao, Faraz Jivan, Tzia-Ming Onn, Rohan Fernandes, Thao D. Nguyen and David H. Gracias

      Version of Record online: 15 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370041

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      A new biofabrication approach to synthesize cell-laden hydrogels in anatomically relevant three dimensional geometries is described by D. H. Gracias and co-workers on page 1142. The inside cover shows the highly parallel and spontaneous self-assembly of photopatterned two dimensional cell-laden hydrogels into simultaneously curved and patterned microstructures. Graphics: Mustapha Jamal and Martin Rietveld.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
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    4. Masthead
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      Masthead: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 8/2013)

      Version of Record online: 15 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370042

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Nano-Graphene Oxide: A Potential Multifunctional Platform for Cancer Therapy (pages 1072–1090)

      Gil Gonçalves, Mercedes Vila, María-Teresa Portolés, María Vallet-Regi, José Gracio and Paula Alexandrina A. P. Marques

      Version of Record online: 22 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300023

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      The synergistic effects resulting from the assembly of well-defined structures at the nano-GO surface, in addition to its morphology, surface chemistry and its intrinsic optical, mechanical, and electronic properties, allow the development of new multifunctional hybrid materials with a high potential in multimodal cancer therapy. A comprehensive review of the fundamental properties of nano-GO requirements for cancer therapy and the first developments of nano-GO as a platform for this purpose is presented.

      Corrected by:

      Correction: Nano-Graphene Oxide: A Potential Multifunctional Platform for Cancer Therapy

      Vol. 3, Issue 7, 956, Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2014

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Review
    7. Communications
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    9. Frontispiece
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    1. Large-Scale Fabrication of Free-Standing, Micropatterned Silica Nanotubes Via a Hybrid Hydrogel-Templated Route (pages 1091–1095)

      Song Chen, Xuetao Shi, Shanmugavel Chinnathambi and Nobutaka Hanagata

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200374

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      Free-standing, micropatterned silica nanotube membranes are in situ fabricated using a micropatterned silica-coated collagen hybrid hydrogel as template. They are substrate-free, and not only maintained their micropatterned microstructure well, but also exhibited strong cell contact guidance ability to direct cell alignment and differentiation, indicating their good potential for biomedical applications.

    2. Switchable Antimicrobial and Antifouling Hydrogels with Enhanced Mechanical Properties (pages 1096–1102)

      Bin Cao, Qiong Tang, Linlin Li, Jayson Humble, Haiyan Wu, Lingyun Liu and Gang Cheng

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200359

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      New switchable hydrogels are developed. Under acidic conditions, hydrogels undergo self-cyclization and can catch and kill bacteria. Under neutral/basic conditions, hydrogels undergo ring-opening and can release killed bacterial cells and resist protein adsorption and bacterial attachment. Smart hydrogels also show a dramatically improved mechanical property, which is highly desired for biomedical applications.

    3. A Diamond Nanoneedle Array for Potential High-Throughput Intracellular Delivery (pages 1103–1107)

      Xianfeng Chen, Guangyu Zhu, Yang Yang, Beilei Wang, Li Yan, Kenneth Yin Zhang, Kenneth Kam-Wing Lo and Wenjun Zhang

      Version of Record online: 27 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200362

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A dense diamond nanoneedle array is capable of rapidly and conveniently delivering fluorescent probe and drug molecules to a large number of cells. This simple approach paves the way for potential high-throughput delivery of genes, drugs, and fluorescent probes into cells without endocytosis.

    4. Fabrication of Nature-Inspired Microfluidic Network for Perfusable Tissue Constructs (pages 1108–1113)

      Jiankang He, Mao Mao, Yaxiong Liu, Jinyou Shao, Zhongmin Jin and Dichen Li

      Version of Record online: 2 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200404

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      A microreplication method is presented to transfer nature optimized vascular network of leaf venation into various synthetic matrixes. The biomaterial hydrogel with these microfluidic networks is proven to facilitate the growth of endothelial cells and simultaneously function as convection pathways to transport nutrients and oxygen in a pump-free bioreactor setup, which is crucial for the long-term viability of encapsulated cells.

    5. A Self-Adjuvanting Supramolecular Vaccine Carrying a Folded Protein Antigen (pages 1114–1119)

      Gregory A. Hudalla, Justin A. Modica, Ye F. Tian, Jai S. Rudra, Anita S. Chong, Tao Sun, Milan Mrksich and Joel H. Collier

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200435

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      This work illustrates a strategy for the design of molecularly defined immunotherapies, using a blend of supramolecular peptide self-assembly and active site-directed protein capture.

    6. A Neutral Envelope-Type Nanoparticle Containing pH-Responsive and SS-Cleavable Lipid-Like Material as a Carrier for Plasmid DNA (pages 1120–1125)

      Hidetaka Akita, Ryohei Ishiba, Hiroto Hatakeyama, Hiroki Tanaka, Yusuke Sato, Kota Tange, Masaya Arai, Kazuhiro Kubo and Hideyoshi Harashima

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200431

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      SS-cleavable proton-activated lipid-like material (ssPalm) functions as a key element in a lipid nanoparticle in which pDNA is encapsulated. The ssPalm contains dual sensing motifs that can respond to the intracellular environment; a proton-sponge unit (tertiary amines) that functions in response to an acidic environment (endosome/lysosome), and disulfide bonding that can be cleaved in a reducing environment (cytosol).

    7. Rapid, Guanosine 5'-Diphosphate-Induced, Gelation of Chitosan Sponges as Novel Injectable Scaffolds for Soft Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery Applications (pages 1126–1130)

      Mina Mekhail, Jamal Daoud, Guillermina Almazan and Maryam Tabrizian

      Version of Record online: 4 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200371

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      Novel injectable chitosan sponges based on rapid ionic crosslinking using guanosine 5′-diphosphate are introduced. The rapid gelation, high water retention, desirable physicochemical properties, soft tissue-like mechanical properties, and excellent cytocompatibility make these injectable sponges promising candidates for tissue regeneration and drug delivery applications.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Bulk Manufacture of Concentrated Oxygen Gas-Filled Microparticles for Intravenous Oxygen Delivery (pages 1131–1141)

      John N. Kheir, Brian D. Polizzotti, Lindsay M. Thomson, Daniel W. O'Connell, Katherine J. Black, Robert W. Lee, James N. Wilking, Adam C. Graham, David C. Bell and Francis X. McGowan

      Version of Record online: 8 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200350

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      Lipid-based oxygen microparticles have been described as a means to administer oxygen gas intravenously as a means to reverse systemic hypoxemia. This work describes the bulk manufacture of concentrated, gas-filled microparticles using a high shear homogenizer, creating microparticles which are stable at room temperature for 100 days. These microparticles transfer oxygen to human blood within seconds of contact in vitro, without signs of hemolysis or complement activation.

    2. Bio-Origami Hydrogel Scaffolds Composed of Photocrosslinked PEG Bilayers (pages 1142–1150)

      Mustapha Jamal, Sachin S. Kadam, Rui Xiao, Faraz Jivan, Tzia-Ming Onn, Rohan Fernandes, Thao D. Nguyen and David H. Gracias

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200458

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      Hydrogel bilayers containing photoencapsulated cells self-fold into curved and micropatterned bio-origami geometries. Self-folding is driven by differential swelling of the hydrogel layers and a variety of microstructured bilayers can be photopatterned simultaneously. Bio-origami hydrogels can be used to direct the growth of cells into anatomically relevant 3D geometries for long-term cell culture studies.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Integration of Scaffolds into Full-Thickness Skin Wounds: The Connexin Response (pages 1151–1160)

      Daniel J. Gilmartin, Maia M. Alexaline, Chris Thrasivoulou, Anthony R. J. Phillips, Suwan N. Jayasinghe and David L. Becker

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200357

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      The in vivo wound healing response to polymer scaffolds at the cell biology level remains little investigated. Here, a variety of scaffolds are applied to wounds and it is found that re-epithelialization is perturbed and the gap junction protein Connexin 43 is deleteriously up-regulated. Through bioactivation of scaffolds using Connexin 43 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, the biocompatibility of scaffolds for clinical use can be improved.

  8. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cell Migration: Tunable Substrates Unveil Chemical Complementation of a Genetic Cell Migration Defect (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 8/2013) (page 1161)

      Janina Kristin Hellmann, Nadine Perschmann, Joachim P. Spatz and Friedrich Frischknecht

      Version of Record online: 15 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201370044

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      Sporozoite motility is essential for malaria transmission and constitutes the first target for intervention within the human body. On page 1162 J. P. Spatz, F. Frischknecht, and co-workers use a set of tunable substrates with changed ligand spacing and elasticity to show that a small chemical compound that stabilizes the actin cytoskeleton can compensate the motility defects of parasites that lack a surface protein important for substrate adhesion.

  9. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Full Papers
    1. Tunable Substrates Unveil Chemical Complementation of a Genetic Cell Migration Defect (pages 1162–1169)

      Janina Kristin Hellmann, Nadine Perschmann, Joachim P. Spatz and Friedrich Frischknecht

      Version of Record online: 25 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200426

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      Malaria parasites can move extremely fast on different substrates. Using a set of tunable substrates with changed ligand spacing and elasticity, it is shown that a small chemical compound that stabilizes the actin cytoskeleton can compensate the motility defects of parasites that lack a surface protein important for substrate adhesion.

    2. An Electrochemically Actuated MEMS Device for Individualized Drug Delivery: an In Vitro Study (pages 1170–1178)

      Peiyi Song, Danny Jian Hang Tng, Rui Hu, Guimiao Lin, Ellis Meng and Ken-Tye Yong

      Version of Record online: 12 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200356

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      A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device is designed and fabricated for programmable drug delivery. The device is demonstrated to be used for tailoring the drug dosages for disease treatment in an in vitro study on pancreatic cancer cell colonies. It provides a promising novel platform for individualized disease treatment in future medicine and automatic in vitro test in drug development industry.

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