Advanced Healthcare Materials

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 1

January, 2014

Volume 3, Issue 1

Pages 1–148

  1. Cover Picture

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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Full Papers
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      Drug Delivery: Implantable Silk Composite Microneedles for Programmable Vaccine Release Kinetics and Enhanced Immunogenicity in Transcutaneous Immunization (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 1/2014) (page 1)

      Peter C. DeMuth, Younjin Min, Darrell J. Irvine and Paula T. Hammond

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201470001

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      Composite silk/PAA microneedles structure stabilizes sensitive biological molecules at room temperature, and then allows rapid disintegration in the skin following application through dissolution of the PAA polymer. On page 47, Darrell J. Irvine, Paula T. Hammond, and co-workers, show how silk hydrogel tips are then implanted in the skin tissue to sustain delivery, while PAA-loaded agents are released in a single local bolus.

  2. Inside Front Cover

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    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Frontispiece
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      Sensors: Stretchable, Multiplexed pH Sensors With Demonstrations on Rabbit and Human Hearts Undergoing Ischemia (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 1/2014) (page 2)

      Hyun-Joong Chung, Matthew S. Sulkin, Jong-Seon Kim, Camille Goudeseune, Hsin-Yun Chao, Joseph W. Song, Sang Yoon Yang, Yung-Yu Hsu, Roozbeh Ghaffari, Igor R. Efimov and John A. Rogers

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201470002

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      On page 59, John A. Rogers and team present precise spatiotemporal mapping of pH on the epicardial surface by an ultrathin stretchable electronic device. The results illustrate that advanced strategies in materials assembly and electrochemical growth can yield interconnected arrays of miniaturized IrOx pH sensors encapsulated in thin, low-modulus elastomers to yield conformal monitoring systems capable of non-invasive measurements on the surface of the beating heart.

  3. Back Cover

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    5. Masthead
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      Radiosensitizers: Enhanced Tumor Accumulation of Sub-2 nm Gold Nanoclusters for Cancer Radiation Therapy (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 1/2014) (page 152)

      Xiao-Dong Zhang, Jie Chen, Zhentao Luo, Di Wu, Xiu Shen, Sha-Sha Song, Yuan-Ming Sun, Pei-Xun Liu, Jing Zhao, Shuaidong Huo, Saijun Fan, Feiyue Fan, Xing-Jie Liang and Jianping Xie

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201470006

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      Ultrasmall (<2 nm) gold nanoclusters are used by Xing-Jie Liang, Jianping Xie, and colleagues as a new type of metabolizable and efficient radiosensitizers for cancer radiotherapy, on page 133. In particular, the gold nanoclusters consisting of 25 gold atoms and 18 thiolate ligands show attractive features for cancer radiotherapy including preferential tumor deposition, strong radiotherapy enhancement, and efficient renal clearance.

  4. Masthead

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      Masthead: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 1/2014)

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201470005

  5. Contents

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  6. Editorial

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      Moving Healthcare Forward (pages 8–9)

      Lorna Stimson

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300664

  7. Review

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    1. Silicon Quantum Dots for Biological Applications (pages 10–29)

      Shanmugavel Chinnathambi, Song Chen, Singaravelu Ganesan and Nobutaka Hanagata

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300157

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      Silicon quantum dots can be used as in vitro and in vivo imaging agents and carriers for drug delivery because of their wide fluorescence spectral regions from near-infrared to near-ultraviolet ranges and biocompatible property. This Review introduces the synthesis, surface functionalization, optical property, and biological application of silicon quantum dots.

  8. Communications

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    1. Immobilization of Actively Thromboresistant Assemblies on Sterile Blood-Contacting Surfaces (pages 30–35)

      Zheng Qu, Venkat Krishnamurthy, Carolyn A. Haller, Brent M. Dorr, Ulla M. Marzec, Sawan Hurst, Monica T. Hinds, Stephen R. Hanson, David R. Liu and Elliot L. Chaikof

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300110

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      Rapid one-step modification of thrombomodulin with alkylamine derivatives such as azide, biotin, and PEG is achieved using an evolved sortase (eSrtA) mutant. The feasibility of a point-of-care scheme is demonstrated herein to site-specifically immobilize azido-thrombomodulin on sterilized commercial ePTFE vascular grafts, which exhibit superior thromboresistance compared with commercial heparin-coated grafts in a primate model of acute graft thrombosis.

    2. A Highly Efficient Colorimetric Immunoassay Using a Nanocomposite Entrapping Magnetic and Platinum Nanoparticles in Ordered Mesoporous Carbon (pages 36–41)

      Moon Il Kim, Youngjin Ye, Min-Ah Woo, Jinwoo Lee and Hyun Gyu Park

      Article first published online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300100

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      Nanocomposite to achieve ultrafast immunoassay: A new synergistically integrated nanocomposite consisting of magnetic and platinum nanoparticles, simultaneously entrapped in mesoporous carbon, is developed as a promising enzyme mimetic candidate to achieve ultrafast colorimetric immunoassays. Using new assay system, clinically important target molecules, such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and diarrhea-causing rotavirus, can be detected in only 3 min at room temperature with high specificity and sensitivity.

    3. A Reusable Sensor for the Label-Free Detection of Specific Oligonucleotides by Surface Plasmon Fluorescence Spectroscopy (pages 42–46)

      Gilbert Nöll, Qiang Su, Björn Heidel and Yaming Yu

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300056

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      The development of a reusable molecular beacon (MB)-based sensor for the label-free detection of specific oligonucleotides using surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) as the readout method is described. The MBs are chemisorbed at planar gold surfaces serving as fluorescence quenching units. Target oligonucleotides of 24 bases can be detected within a few minutes at high single-mismatch discrimination rates.

  9. Full Papers

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    3. Inside Front Cover
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    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Review
    9. Communications
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    11. Frontispiece
    12. Full Papers
    1. Implantable Silk Composite Microneedles for Programmable Vaccine Release Kinetics and Enhanced Immunogenicity in Transcutaneous Immunization (pages 47–58)

      Peter C. DeMuth, Younjin Min, Darrell J. Irvine and Paula T. Hammond

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300139

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      Composite dissolving microneedles composed of vaccine-loaded (ovalbumin–red and blue), controlled-release silk hydrogel tips supported on rapidly soluble PAA pedestals provide non-invasive transcutaneous implantation of persistent microscopic silk implants for sustained vaccine release together with bolus delivery of PAA-loaded cargos in vivo. Programmable long-term vaccine release together with microneedle administration enhanced cellular and humoral immune responses relative to parenteral immunization.

    2. Stretchable, Multiplexed pH Sensors With Demonstrations on Rabbit and Human Hearts Undergoing Ischemia (pages 59–68)

      Hyun-Joong Chung, Matthew S. Sulkin, Jong-Seon Kim, Camille Goudeseune, Hsin-Yun Chao, Joseph W. Song, Sang Yoon Yang, Yung-Yu Hsu, Roozbeh Ghaffari, Igor R. Efimov and John A. Rogers

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300124

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An ultrathin stretchable electronic device allows precise spatiotemporal mapping of pH on the epicardial surface. Matrix arrays of miniaturized IrOx pH sensors encapsulated in thin, low-modulus elastomers yield soft, conformal monitoring systems capable of noninvasive measurements on the surface of the beating heart. Experimental demonstrations illustrate the ability of these systems to provide real-time monitoring of pH on the surfaces of explanted rabbit hearts and a donated human heart during protocols of ischemia–reperfusion.

  10. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Drug Delivery: A Fast pH-Switchable and Self-Healing Supramolecular Hydrogel Carrier for Guided, Local Catheter Injection in the Infarcted Myocardium (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 1/2014) (page 69)

      Maartje M. C. Bastings, Stefan Koudstaal, Roxanne E. Kieltyka, Yoko Nakano, A. C. H. Pape, Dries A. M. Feyen, Frebus J. van Slochteren, Pieter A. Doevendans, Joost P. G. Sluijter, E. W. Meijer, Steven A. J. Chamuleau and Patricia Y. W. Dankers

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201470004

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      In basic environment, the fibers are not cross-linked and are present in solution. On page 70, Steven A. J. Chamuleau, Patricia Y. W. Dankers, and team show that, after injection, the tissue's natural pH causes gelation by cross-link formation, and thereby capturing of the growth factors. The heart-map is produced by electro-conduction mapping of the infarcted region, and the dots represent the material injection sites where the growth-factor delivery reservoirs are created.

  11. Full Papers

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    3. Inside Front Cover
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      A Fast pH-Switchable and Self-Healing Supramolecular Hydrogel Carrier for Guided, Local Catheter Injection in the Infarcted Myocardium (pages 70–78)

      Maartje M. C. Bastings, Stefan Koudstaal, Roxanne E. Kieltyka, Yoko Nakano, A. C. H. Pape, Dries A. M. Feyen, Frebus J. van Slochteren, Pieter A. Doevendans, Joost P. G. Sluijter, E. W. Meijer, Steven A. J. Chamuleau and Patricia Y. W. Dankers

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300076

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      A supramolecular hydrogel system is reported that can be quickly switched into a liquid at pH > 8.5, with a viscosity low enough to enable passage through a 1-m long catheter while rapidly forming a hydrogel in contact with myocardial tissue. The hydrogel has self-healing properties taking care of adjustment to the injection site. Hydrogel delivery of growth factors shows a clear reduction of infarct scar collagen in a pig myocardial infarction model.

    2. Titanium Microbead-Based Porous Implants: Bead Size Controls Cell Response and Host Integration (pages 79–87)

      Nihal Engin Vrana, Agnès Dupret-Bories, Philippe Schultz, Christian Debry, Dominique Vautier and Philippe Lavalle

      Article first published online: 27 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200369

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      Microbead-based porous titanium implants with different granulometries significantly affect cell behavior both in vitro and in vivo. By using smaller microbeads, faster filling of the pores is achieved in vitro and also implants with smaller bead size integrated faster with the host in rat and rabbit models. Utilization of such physical features for controlling implant integration can ensure fast, robust attachment for many applications such as dental, tracheal, and hip implants.

    3. Highly Fluorescent and Photostable Probe for Long-Term Bacterial Viability Assay Based on Aggregation-Induced Emission (pages 88–96)

      Engui Zhao, Yuning Hong, Sijie Chen, Chris W. T. Leung, Carrie Y. K. Chan, Ryan T. K. Kwok, Jacky W. Y. Lam and Ben Zhong Tang

      Article first published online: 28 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201200475

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      Bacteria with compromised membranes open the access for TPE-2BA, a fluorophore with aggregation-induced emission characteristics, to approach their DNA. Such interaction selectively lights up dead bacteria. Possessing high brightness, excellent photostability, and appreciable biocompatibility, TPE-2BA represents a well-suited candidate for long-term tracking of bacterial viability and for bactericide screening.

    4. Surface Coatings that Promote Rapid Release of Peptide-Based AgrC Inhibitors for Attenuation of Quorum Sensing in Staphylococcus aureus (pages 97–105)

      Adam H. Broderick, Danielle M. Stacy, Yftah Tal-Gan, Michael J. Kratochvil, Helen E. Blackwell and David M. Lynn

      Article first published online: 28 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300119

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      An approach to target the AgrC quorum sensing (QS) circuit in Staphylococcus aureus is reported. The approach is based on the release of potent peptidic inhibitors from polymer-based coatings. This QS circuit regulates production of toxins that cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS). The results thus suggest approaches that could suppress toxin production and reduce the severity of TSS.

    5. Silver Nanoparticles Impregnated Alginate–Chitosan-Blended Nanocarrier Induces Apoptosis in Human Glioblastoma Cells (pages 106–114)

      Shilpa Sharma, S. Chockalingam, Pallab Sanpui, Arun Chattopadhyay and Siddhartha Sankar Ghosh

      Article first published online: 15 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300090

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      Apoptosis at low silver nanoparticles concentration is induced in refractory human glioblastoma cells using alginate–chitosan-blended nanocarriers.

    6. Monodispersed Bioactive Glass Submicron Particles and Their Effect on Bone Marrow and Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells (pages 115–125)

      Olga Tsigkou, Sheyda Labbaf, Molly M. Stevens, Alexandra E. Porter and Julian R. Jones

      Article first published online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300126

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      Spherical monodispersed bioactive glass (80 mol% SiO2, 20 mol% CaO) particles with diameters of 215 ± 20 nm, fabricated by adapting a sol–gel processing route, are internalized by human bone marrow and adipose-derived stem cells.

    7. Multilayered Heparin Hydrogel Microwells for Cultivation of Primary Hepatocytes (pages 126–132)

      Jungmok You, Dong-Sik Shin, Dipali Patel, Yandong Gao and Alexander Revzin

      Article first published online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300054

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      All-heparin gel microstructures are created to simultaneously control biochemical and biophysical cues as well as heterotypic cellular interactions. These microstructured surfaces are shown to induce the highest levels of hepatic function. Importantly, stromal cells are added to create micropatterned co-cultures of hepatocytes and fibroblasts to further enhance hepatic function.

    8. Enhanced Tumor Accumulation of Sub-2 nm Gold Nanoclusters for Cancer Radiation Therapy (pages 133–141)

      Xiao-Dong Zhang, Jie Chen, Zhentao Luo, Di Wu, Xiu Shen, Sha-Sha Song, Yuan-Ming Sun, Pei-Xun Liu, Jing Zhao, Shuaidong Huo, Saijun Fan, Feiyue Fan, Xing-Jie Liang and Jianping Xie

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300189

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      A new type of radiosensitizers is developed by integrating an ultrasmall gold nanoclusters (NCs, <2 nm) with a biocompatible coating ligand (a naturally occurring biomolecule, e.g., glutathione, GSH) into a single entity. Both in vitro and in vivo data suggest that the GSH-protected gold NCs are a promising metabolizable and efficient radiosensitizer for cancer radiotherapy.

    9. Distearoyl Anchor-Painted Erythrocytes with Prolonged Ligand Retention and Circulation Properties In Vivo (pages 142–148)

      Guixin Shi, Rajesh Mukthavaram, Santosh Kesari and Dmitri Simberg

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300084

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      There is a great need for efficient strategies for surface modification of cells for in vivo applications. Surface immunoglobulin-painted red blood cells (RBCs) are shown to retain antibody for prolonged periods of time in vitro and in vivo. Optimized RBCs show circulation half life in mice of more than 3 d.

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