Advanced Healthcare Materials

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 3

March, 2014

Volume 3, Issue 3

Pages 305–458

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Bioelectronics: Nanovesicle-Based Bioelectronic Nose for the Diagnosis of Lung Cancer from Human Blood (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 3/2014) (page 305)

      Jong Hyun Lim, Juhun Park, Eun Hae Oh, Hwi Jin Ko, Seunghun Hong and Tai Hyun Park

      Article first published online: 3 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201470012

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A human nose-mimetic diagnosis system that can distinguish the odor of a lung cancer biomarker is developed by Seunghun Hong, Tai Hyun Park, and team on page 360. Nanovesicles containing human olfactory receptors are combined with carbon nanotubes in order to smell the biomarker from human blood plasma sensitively and selectively without any pretreatment processes.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Organic Polymers: Photostimulation of Whole-Cell Conductance in Primary Rat Neocortical Astrocytes Mediated by Organic Semiconducting Thin Films (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 3/2014) (page 306)

      Valentina Benfenati, Nicola Martino, Maria Rosa Antognazza, Assunta Pistone, Stefano Toffanin, Stefano Ferroni, Guglielmo Lanzani and Michele Muccini

      Article first published online: 3 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201470013

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On page 392, Valentina Benfenati, Maria Rosa Antognazza, Michele Muccini, and colleagues show how the photostimulation of a semiconducting polymer blend modulates the ion channel conductance of astrocytes cultured on top of the device. The device can be used as a selective tool to study ion channel conductances in non-excitable cells.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cancer Cells: Underwater-Transparent Nanodendritic Coatings for Directly Monitoring Cancer Cells (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 3/2014) (page 460)

      Gao Yang, Hongliang Liu, Xueli Liu, Pengchao Zhang, Chao Huang, Tailin Xu, Lei Jiang and Shutao Wang

      Article first published online: 3 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201470016

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A nanodendritic silica coating is shown to be highly transparent under water. On page 332, Shutao Wang and co-workers show such unique coating can not only efficiently capture cancer cells from whole blood samples, but also directly monitor the captured cancer cells. This nanostructured coating represents a multifunctional platform for biomedicine applications.

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Masthead: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 3/2014)

      Article first published online: 3 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201470015

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Contents: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 3/2014) (pages 307–312)

      Article first published online: 3 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201470014

  6. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Solution-Gated Graphene Transistors for Chemical and Biological Sensors (pages 313–331)

      Feng Yan, Meng Zhang and Jinhua Li

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300221

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Solution-gated graphene transistors show promising applications in various chemical and biological sensors, including pH, ion, cell, bacterial, DNA, protein, and glucose sensors. The sensors show many advantages over conventional techniques in terms of sensitivity, cost, mechanical flexibility, miniaturization, and biocompatibility. It is expected that the graphene transistors will find broad applications in medical and healthcare products.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Underwater-Transparent Nanodendritic Coatings for Directly Monitoring Cancer Cells (pages 332–337)

      Gao Yang, Hongliang Liu, Xueli Liu, Pengchao Zhang, Chao Huang, Tailin Xu, Lei Jiang and Shutao Wang

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300233

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Underwater-transparent nanodendritic coatings are easily fabricated by a three-step template process. After modification with anti-EpCAM, the coatings exhibit the capability for efficiently capturing rare number of cancer cells from whole blood. On the other hand, the unique underwater transparency enables the coatings to directly monitor captured cancer cells by optical imaging.

    2. Microneedle Electrodes Toward an Amperometric Glucose-Sensing Smart Patch (pages 338–342)

      Michael A. Invernale, Benjamin C. Tang, Royce L. York, Long Le, David Yupeng Hou and Daniel G. Anderson

      Article first published online: 29 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300142

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Here, efforts toward the development of a microneedle-based glucose sensor or “smart patch” for intradermal glucose sensing are described. Metallic microneedle array electrodes, conducting polymers, and glucose oxidase form the sensor platform. This work represents the first steps toward the development of painless, transdermal-sensing devices for continuous glucose monitoring

    3. Peptide Amphiphile Nanoparticles Enhance the Immune Response Against a CpG-Adjuvanted Influenza Antigen (pages 343–348)

      Harshal Zope, Christophe Barnier Quer, Paul H. H. Bomans, Nico A. J. M. Sommerdijk, Alexander Kros and Wim Jiskoot

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300247

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cationic peptide amphiphile nanoparticles are employed for co-delivery of immune modulator CpG and antigen. This results in better targeting to the antigen presenting cells and eliciting strong Th1 response, which is effective against the intracellular pathogens.

    4. Chitin Microneedles for an Easy-to-Use Tuberculosis Skin Test (pages 349–353)

      Jungho Jin, Valerie Reese, Rhea Coler, Darrick Carter and Marco Rolandi

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300185

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An easy-to-use tuberculosis skin test is developed with chitin microneedles that deliver purified protein derivative at the correct skin depth and result in a positive test in BCG-immunized guinea pigs

    5. Autophagy-Sensitized Cytotoxicity of Quantum Dots in PC12 Cells (pages 354–359)

      Xiaoming Li, Nan Chen, Yuanyuan Su, Yao He, Min Yin, Min Wei, Lianhui Wang, Wei Huang, Chunhai Fan and Qing Huang

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300294

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Both CdTe and CdTe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots induce similar levels of autophagy in PC12 and HEK293 cells, while the former exhibits higher toxicity. Low levels of cadmium ions are not sufficient to induce either autophagy or cytotoxicity by themselves. Interestingly, the combination of cadmium ions and CdTe/CdS/ZnS mimics the toxic effect of CdTe, suggesting that autophagy sensitizes cells to cadmium ions.

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Full Papers
    1. Nanovesicle-Based Bioelectronic Nose for the Diagnosis of Lung Cancer from Human Blood (pages 360–366)

      Jong Hyun Lim, Juhun Park, Eun Hae Oh, Hwi Jin Ko, Seunghun Hong and Tai Hyun Park

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300174

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Olfactory nanovesicles are combined with carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The nanovesicles recognize lung cancer biomarkers and generate responses through the olfactory signal transduction. The generated responses are converted into electronic signals through the carbon nanotubes. This sensitive and selective bioelectronic nose detects the biomarker from human blood plasma without any pretreatment processes.

    2. Generation of Spatially Aligned Collagen Fiber Networks Through Microtransfer Molding (pages 367–374)

      Nisarga Naik, Jeffrey Caves, Elliot L. Chaikof and Mark G. Allen

      Article first published online: 29 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300112

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology is employed for fabricating spatially aligned, fiber-reinforced composites with adjustable collagen fiber dimensions, layouts, and distribution within an elastin-like protein matrix, yielding a biocomposite with controllable mechanical responses. Straight fiber composites display orthotropic responses and tunable mechanical characteristics consistent with the fraction of collagen fibers. Composite systems based on crimped fiber layouts exhibit strain-dependent stiffness.

    3. Selectivity in Bone Targeting with Multivalent Dendritic Polyanion Dye Conjugates (pages 375–385)

      Dominic Gröger, Michael Kerschnitzki, Marie Weinhart, Sabine Reimann, Tobias Schneider, Benjamin Kohl, Wolfgang Wagermaier, Gundula Schulze-Tanzil, Peter Fratzl and Rainer Haag

      Article first published online: 29 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300205

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fully synthetic, multivalent polyanion dye conjugates are applied for selective bone targeting. The in vitro binding affinity toward hydroxyapatite and collagen is strongly dependent on the anionic moiety. Polyglycerol-based polyelectrolytes are shown to be potent candidates for selective, bone-targeted imaging applications, tissue engineering, or drug delivery.

    4. Nanofibers Implant Functionalized by Neural Growth Factor as a Strategy to Innervate a Bioengineered Tooth (pages 386–391)

      Sandy Eap, Thibault Bécavin, Laetitia Keller, Tunay Kökten, Florence Fioretti, Jean-Luc Weickert, Etienne Deveaux, Nadia Benkirane-Jessel and Sabine Kuchler-Bopp

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300281

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A unique implant is developed based on active electrospun nanofibers functionalized by neural growth factor and dental germ to physiologically innervate an in vivo bioengineered tooth.

    5. Photostimulation of Whole-Cell Conductance in Primary Rat Neocortical Astrocytes Mediated by Organic Semiconducting Thin Films (pages 392–399)

      Valentina Benfenati, Nicola Martino, Maria Rosa Antognazza, Assunta Pistone, Stefano Toffanin, Stefano Ferroni, Guglielmo Lanzani and Michele Muccini

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300179

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Visible light excitation of a semiconducting polymer blend modulates the whole-cell membrane conductance of astrocytes cultured on the top of the device and depolarizes their resting membrane potential. The phototransduction mechanism is based on an inwardly rectifying chloride conductance, mediated by ClC-2 channel protein. The device can be used as a selective tool to study ion channel conductances in non-excitable cells

    6. Antiretroviral Solid Drug Nanoparticles with Enhanced Oral Bioavailability: Production, Characterization, and In Vitro–In Vivo Correlation (pages 400–411)

      Tom O. McDonald, Marco Giardiello, Philip Martin, Marco Siccardi, Neill J. Liptrott, Darren Smith, Phill Roberts, Paul Curley, Alessandro Schipani, Saye H. Khoo, James Long, Alison J. Foster, Steven P. Rannard and Andrew Owen

      Article first published online: 1 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300280

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Emulsion-templated freeze-drying to form solid drug nanoparticles is applied for the first time to the optimization of oral HIV therapies. A solid formulation with 70 wt% efavirenz is optimized and shown to have considerable long-term stability in the amorphous state, with lower cytotoxicity and higher in vivo oral bioavailability than conventional formulations. The results offer a reduced daily drug dose and the first oral HIV nanomedicine.

    7. A Rapid, Direct, Quantitative, and Label-Free Detector of Cardiac Biomarker Troponin T Using Near-Infrared Fluorescent Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Sensors (pages 412–423)

      Jingqing Zhang, Sebastian Kruss, Andrew J. Hilmer, Steven Shimizu, Zeke Schmois, Flor De La Cruz, Paul W. Barone, Nigel F. Reuel, Daniel A. Heller and Michael S. Strano

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300033

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An array of fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) sensors is fabricated to detect a cardiac biomarker, troponin T (cTnT). As cTnT binds to a nanotube–antibody construct, which is incorporated into an inert chitosan gel matrix, the local environment of the sensor changes, resulting in a change in the SWCNT fluorescence intensity. Detection can be completed within 5 min, and the sensor responds linearly to cTnT concentration. This platform provides a promising new tool for point-of-care acute myocardial infarction detection in the future.

    8. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Hinder Microglia Function Interfering with Cell Migration and Phagocytosis (pages 424–432)

      Juan C. Villegas, Laura Álvarez-Montes, Lidia Rodríguez-Fernández, Jesús González, Rafael Valiente and Mónica L. Fanarraga

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300178

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Microglial cells undergo a dose-dependent cell division arrest and apoptosis when treated with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). It is shown that how MWCNTs severely interfere with both cell migration and phagocytosis in live microglia. These results provide strategic clues of how to biocompatibilize MWCNTs to reduce the damage in brain macrophages to develop new nanodrugs based on MWCNTs.

    9. Nanostructured Hollow Tubes Based on Chitosan and Alginate Multilayers (pages 433–440)

      Joana M. Silva, Ana Rita C. Duarte, Catarina A. Custódio, Praveen Sher, Ana I. Neto, António C. M. Pinho, Jaime Fonseca, Rui L. Reis and João F. Mano

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300265

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new approach is used to create nanostructured chitosan/alginate tubes, combining layer-by-layer and template leaching. This approach shows promise for the development of hybrid devices for vascular tissue engineering.

    10. Poly(ethylene oxide)-block-Polyphosphoester-graft-Paclitaxel Conjugates with Acid-Labile Linkages as a pH-Sensitive and Functional Nanoscopic Platform for Paclitaxel Delivery (pages 441–448)

      Jiong Zou, Fuwu Zhang, Shiyi Zhang, Stephanie F. Pollack, Mahmoud Elsabahy, Jingwei Fan and Karen L. Wooley

      Article first published online: 30 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300235

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An acid-labile, polyphosphoester-based polymeric paclitaxel (PTX) conjugate containing ultra-high levels of PTX loading has been constructed by the connection of PTX molecules to the polymer backbones via pH-sensitive β-thiopropionate linkages. The accelerated PTX release profile at acidic pH provides for a promising application in chemotherapy.

    11. Microfluidic Generation of Gradient Hydrogels to Modulate Hematopoietic Stem Cell Culture Environment (pages 449–458)

      Bhushan P. Mahadik, Tobias D. Wheeler, Luke J. Skertich, Paul J. A. Kenis and Brendan A. C. Harley

      Article first published online: 29 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300263

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A microfluidic mixing platform is employed to generate 3D hydrogels containing stable, overlapping gradients of cell and matrix signals inspired by hematopoietic stem cell niches within the bone marrow. Primary hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells remain viable during mixing and culture within the bone marrow biochip platform. Analytical methods at multiple scales are described to examine hematopoietic cell bioactivity.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION