Advanced Healthcare Materials

Cover image for Vol. 3 Issue 7

July, 2014

Volume 3, Issue 7

Pages 949–1118

  1. Cover Picture

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      Tissue Engineering: Graphene-Based Patterning and Differentiation of C2C12 Myoblasts (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 7/2014) (page 949)

      Piyush Bajaj, Jose A. Rivera, Daniel Marchwiany, Vita Solovyeva and Rashid Bashir

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201470033

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      P. Bajaj, R. Bashir, and co-workers use graphene as a biomaterial for muscle tissue engineering. On page 995 enhanced differentiation and spontaneous alignment of myotubes is observed in accordance with the underlying lithographically patterned graphene substrate. In addition, graphene also leads to the functional maturity of C2C12 myotubes. Cover image created by Janet Sinn-Hanlon, DesignGroup@VetMed, University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign.

  2. Inside Front Cover

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      Magnetic Separation: Track-Etched Magnetic Micropores for Immunomagnetic Isolation of Pathogens (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 7/2014) (page 950)

      Melaku Muluneh, Wu Shang and David Issadore

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201470034

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      On page 1078, D. Issadore and colleagues develop a new approach for isolating pathogens from messy clinical samples. Their platform, Track Etched Magnetic MicropOre (TEMPO), uses a microporous membrane coated with a soft magnetic film, creating enormous arrays of magnetic traps which allow the advantages of microfluidics to be preserved, but is robust against clogging and capable of extremely high flow rates.

  3. Back Cover

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      Cancer Therapy: Vaginal Delivery of Paclitaxel via Nanoparticles with Non-Mucoadhesive Surfaces Suppresses Cervical Tumor Growth (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 7/2014) (page 1120)

      Ming Yang, Tao Yu, Ying-Ying Wang, Samuel K. Lai, Qi Zeng, Bolong Miao, Benjamin C. Tang, Brian W. Simons, Laura M. Ensign, Guanshu Liu, Kannie W.Y. Chan, Chih-Yin Juang, Olcay Mert, Joseph Wood, Jie Fu, Michael T. McMahon, T.-C. Wu, Chien-Fu Hung and Justin Hanes

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201470037

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      Mucus-penetrating particles (MPP) efficiently bypass the sticky mucus layer in the female reproductive tract, whereas conventional nanoparticles (CP) are trapped and rapidly cleared. On page 1044, J. Hanes and team show how MPP achieve close proximity to mouse cervical tumors and provide sustained release of chemodrugs, resulting in superior efficacy compared to CP. The MPP platform may hold similar promise for local chemotherapy against tumors at other mucosal surfaces.

  4. Masthead

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      Masthead: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 7/2014)

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201470036

  5. Contents

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  6. Correction

    1. Top of page
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      Nano-Graphene Oxide: A Potential Multifunctional Platform for Cancer Therapy (page 956)

      Gil Gonçalves, Mercedes Vila, María-Teresa Portolés, María Vallet-Regi, José Gracio and Paula Alexandrina A. P. Marques

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201400329

      This article corrects:

      Nano-Graphene Oxide: A Potential Multifunctional Platform for Cancer Therapy

      Vol. 2, Issue 8, 1072–1090, Version of Record online: 22 MAR 2013

  7. Reviews

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    1. Delivering Colloidal Nanoparticles to Mammalian Cells: A Nano–Bio Interface Perspective (pages 957–976)

      Paolo Verderio, Svetlana Avvakumova, Giulia Alessio, Michela Bellini, Miriam Colombo, Elisabetta Galbiati, Serena Mazzucchelli, Jesus Peñaranda Avila, Benedetta Santini and Davide Prosperi

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300602

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      Challenges and recent advances in delivering colloidal nanoparticles to mammalian cells are presented. This Review focuses on innovative strategies and established techniques for nanoparticle targeting and delivery to subcellular compartments. The response of cellular environment to nanomaterials is also presented to emphasize the importance to develop novel approaches with the aim to improve the control over nanoparticle transport.

    2. Biodegradable Thermogelling Polymers: Working Towards Clinical Applications (pages 977–988)

      Qing Qing Dou, Sing Shy Liow, Enyi Ye, Rajamani Lakshminarayanan and Xian Jun Loh

      Version of Record online: 1 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300627

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      Synthetic thermal responsive hydrogels have found extensive applications for wound healing, drug delivery and controlled release, and scaffold materials in the human body. The development of the next generation of biodegradable thermogels focuses on facile synthetic methods, efficacy of treatment, and tailored multi-functionalities for real applications. The use of biodegradable thermogels as soft biomaterials and their biomedical applications are described in this Review.

  8. Communications

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    1. Modification of Biomaterials with a Self-Protein Inhibits the Macrophage Response (pages 989–994)

      Yoon Kyung Kim, Richard Que, Szu-Wen Wang and Wendy F. Liu

      Version of Record online: 20 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300532

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      A biomaterial inhibits the host immune response by displaying an endo­genously expressed immunomodulatory molecule, CD200. Immobilization of CD200 onto biomaterial surfaces effectively suppresses macrophage activation and reduces inflammatory response to subcutaneously implanted materials.

    2. Graphene-Based Patterning and Differentiation of C2C12 Myoblasts (pages 995–1000)

      Piyush Bajaj, Jose A. Rivera, Daniel Marchwiany, Vita Solovyeva and Rashid Bashir

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300550

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      This study aims at generating highly aligned functional myotubes using graphene as the underlying scaffold. Graphene not only supports the growth of C2C12 muscle cells but also enhances its differentiation and leads to spontaneous patterning of myotubes.

    3. Directed Nerve Regeneration Enabled by Wirelessly Powered Electrodes Printed on a Biodegradable Polymer (pages 1001–1006)

      Christopher Martin, Théophile Dejardin, Andrew Hart, Mathis O. Riehle and David R. S. Cumming

      Version of Record online: 27 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300481

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      Wirelessly directed nerve regeneration: inductively powered electrical stimulation circuits on the biodegradable polymer polycaprolactone demonstrate directed regeneration of sensory neurons from a dorsal root ganglion. These circuits, produced using a unique transfer printing process, illustrate progress towards the use of electrical stimulation systems on biodegradable materials to improve peripheral nerve repair functional outcomes.

    4. Nucleotides as Nontoxic Endogenous Endosomolytic Agents in Drug Delivery (pages 1007–1014)

      Hana Cho, Yong-Yeon Cho, You Han Bae and Han Chang Kang

      Version of Record online: 17 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201400008

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      Nontoxic endogenous nucleotides such as adenosine triphosphate and guanosine triphosphate have secondary phosphate groups, causing proton-buffering capacity and/or hemolytic activity in endolysosomal pH ranges. Nucleotides co-delivered in single polymeric pDNA nanocarrier induce highly enhanced transfection efficiency with negligible cytotoxicity due to their endosomolytic functions.

    5. Magnetic Ligation Method for Quantitative Detection of MicroRNAs (pages 1015–1019)

      Monty Liong, Hyungsoon Im, Maulik D. Majmudar, Aaron D. Aguirre, Matthew Sebas, Hakho Lee and Ralph Weissleder

      Version of Record online: 14 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300672

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      A magnetic ligation method is utilized for the detection of microRNAs among a complex biological background without polymerase chain reaction or nucleotide modification. The sandwich probes assay can be adapted to analyze a panel of microRNAs associated with cardiovascular diseases in heart tissue samples.

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      Thermally Switchable Polymers Achieve Controlled Escherichia coli Detachment (pages 1020–1025)

      Andrew L. Hook, Chien-Yi Chang, David J. Scurr, Robert Langer, Daniel G. Anderson, Paul Williams, Martyn C. Davies and Morgan R. Alexander

      Version of Record online: 4 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300518

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      The thermally triggered release of up to 96% of attached uropathogenic E. coli is achieved on two polymers with opposite changes in surface wettability upon reduction in temperature. This demonstrates that the bacterial attachment to a surface cannot be explained in terms of water contact angle alone; rather, the surface composition of the polymer plays the key role.

  9. Full Papers

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    1. Characterization of Conjugated Polymer Actuation under Cerebral Physiological Conditions (pages 1026–1035)

      Eugene Dariush Daneshvar and Elisabeth Smela

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300610

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      To explore the potential use of conjugated polymer actuators within brain tissue, actuation is characterized at body temperature in artificial cerebrospinal fluid. Despite the mixture of exchanged ions, motion remains monotonic. Applications may include guiding the insertion of neural probes or modulating the position of electrode sites.

    2. Three-Dimensional Paper-Based Model for Cardiac Ischemia (pages 1036–1043)

      Bobak Mosadegh, Borna E. Dabiri, Matthew R. Lockett, Ratmir Derda, Patrick Campbell, Kevin Kit Parker and George M. Whitesides

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300575

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      A paper-based 3D cell culture system recapitulates certain aspects of cardiac ischemia, including gradients of nutrients and migration of fibroblasts. Stacking multiple thin (≈200 μm) layers of paper into thicker (≈1 mm) tissue-like constructs enables precise positioning of different types of cells, tracking of migratory cells between layers, and analysis of cells in specific regions of the stack.

    3. Vaginal Delivery of Paclitaxel via Nanoparticles with Non-Mucoadhesive Surfaces Suppresses Cervical Tumor Growth (pages 1044–1052)

      Ming Yang, Tao Yu, Ying-Ying Wang, Samuel K. Lai, Qi Zeng, Bolong Miao, Benjamin C. Tang, Brian W. Simons, Laura M. Ensign, Guanshu Liu, Kannie W.Y. Chan, Chih-Yin Juang, Olcay Mert, Joseph Wood, Jie Fu, Michael T. McMahon, T.-C. Wu, Chien-Fu Hung and Justin Hanes

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300519

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      Paclitaxel-encapsulated mucus-penetrating particles (MPP) composed entirely of generally regarded as safe (GRAS) materials effectively bypass the mucus barrier and deliver a sustained level of chemo to cervical tumor tissues in mice, resulting in superior suppression of tumor growth compared with conventional particles. The MPP platform provides a promising approach to local chemotherapy against early-stage cervical cancer, and potentially other cancers at mucosal surfaces

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Dynamic Monitoring of Salmonella typhimurium Infection of Polarized Epithelia Using Organic Transistors (pages 1053–1060)

      Scherrine A. Tria, Marc Ramuz, Miriam Huerta, Pierre Leleux, Jonathan Rivnay, Leslie H. Jimison, Adel Hama, George G. Malliaras and Róisín M. Owens

      Version of Record online: 3 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300632

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      Organic electronic materials have opened the door for the development of low-cost, disposable sensors for cell-based in vitro diagnostics. Here, for the first time, the feasibility of using an organic transistor integrated with a human intestinal cell line for detecting a food-borne enteric pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, is shown by dynamically measuring changes in ion flow provoked by the bacteria.

    5. Long-Term Survival of Allograft Murine Islets Coated via Covalently Stabilized Polymers (pages 1061–1070)

      Hernán R. Rengifo, Jaime A. Giraldo, Irayme Labrada and Cherie L. Stabler

      Version of Record online: 5 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300573

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      Application of bioorthogonal polymers for cellular encapsulation: Alginate and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), functionalized with azide and 1-methyl-2-diphenylphos­phino-terephthalate (MDT), respec­tively, form spontaneous and chemoselective crosslinks via the bioorthogonal Staudinger ligation scheme. These polymers are utilized to generate ultrathin coatings on murine pancreatic islets. Resulting coatings are nontoxic and impart significant immunoprotective effects when transplanted in a full allograft mismatch murine model.

    6. Lung Deposition and Cellular Uptake Behavior of Pathogen-Mimicking Nanovaccines in the First 48 Hours (pages 1071–1077)

      Kathleen A. Ross, Shannon L. Haughney, Latrisha K. Petersen, Paola Boggiatto, Michael J. Wannemuehler and Balaji Narasimhan

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300525

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      While F1-V-containing polyanhydride nanovaccines have been previously shown to induce protection against lethal challenge, less is known about their initial interactions with immune cells. This work investigates the pulmonary deposition and cellular internalization of intranasally administered F1-V in conjunction with polyanhydride nanoparticles or MPLA, demonstrating the advantages of prolonged antigen presence together with mild inflammation.

    7. Track-Etched Magnetic Micropores for Immunomagnetic Isolation of Pathogens (pages 1078–1085)

      Melaku Muluneh, Wu Shang and David Issadore

      Version of Record online: 17 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300502

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      A microchip is developed to rapidly and selectively sort magnetically labeled cells from unprocessed suspensions, consisting of a track-etched membrane coated with a soft magnetic film. Track-etched micropores can be fabricated with pore sizes from 30 nm to 100 μm at little cost, enabling this approach to be optimally applied to a wide range of biological targets.

    8. Structural and Biochemical Modification of a Collagen Scaffold to Selectively Enhance MSC Tenogenic, Chondrogenic, and Osteogenic Differentiation (pages 1086–1096)

      Steven R. Caliari and Brendan A. C. Harley

      Version of Record online: 25 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300646

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      Selective modification to microstructural features of a collagen-GAG scaffold is used to direct mesenchymal stem cell differentiation down multiple lineages for osteotendinous interface repair. Combinations of structural and biochemical cues to promote selective tenogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineage specification are identified to support ongoing development of biomaterial platforms for complex orthopedic tissue engineering challenges.

    9. Fabrication of Barium- and Strontium-Doped Silica/Titania Hollow Nanoparticles and Their Synergetic Effects on Promoting Neuronal Differentiation by Activating ERK and p38 Pathways (pages 1097–1106)

      Sojin Kim, Yoonsun Jang, Wan-Kyu Oh, Chanhoi Kim and Jyongsik Jang

      Version of Record online: 21 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300572

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      The barium- and strontium-doped hollow nanoparticles are fabricated using sonication medicated etching and redeposition method with alkaline-earth metal hydroxide solution. PC12 cells co-incubated with the nanoparticles and nerve growth factor (NGF) demonstrate enhanced neuronal differentiation. To deliver NGF into cells efficiently, the nanoparticles are further applied to encapsulate NGF, which exhibits most enhancements in neuronal differentiation.

    10. Effective Nanoparticle-based Gene Delivery by a Protease Triggered Charge Switch (pages 1107–1118)

      Torben Gjetting, Rasmus Irming Jølck and Thomas Lars Andresen

      Version of Record online: 20 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201300503

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      A novel liposomal gene delivery vehicle is developed involving a protease-dependent detachment of a protective PEG coat. Protease digestion causes charge reversion acting as a molecular trigger. A combination of constitutive and titratable cationic lipid facilitates efficient loading of genetic material and endosomal escape leading to highly efficient transfection. The system has potential for therapeutic use with intravenous administration.

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