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Advanced Healthcare Materials

Cover image for Vol. 6 Issue 15

Special Issue: Biomimetic Interfaces in Biomedical Devices

August 9, 2017

Volume 6, Issue 15

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Masthead
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Progress Reports
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Full Papers
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      Tissue Engineering: Rod-Shaped Neural Units for Aligned 3D Neural Network Connection (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 15/2017)

      Midori Kato-Negishi, Hiroaki Onoe, Akane Ito and Shoji Takeuchi

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201770074

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      The cover shows a three-dimensional (3D) neural network formed by rod-shaped neural units, which are 3D fiber-shaped neural tissues with aligned nerve fibers, to connect neural networks with aligned neurons. Neural networks can be formed between the different neural units via synaptic connections as described by Shoji Takeuchi and co-workers in article number 1700143.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Masthead
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Progress Reports
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Full Papers
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      Neuronal Interfaces: Interactions of Neurons with Physical Environments (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 15/2017)

      Michal Marcus, Koby Baranes, Matthew Park, Insung S. Choi, Kyungtae Kang and Orit Shefi

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201770075

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      In Progress Report 1700267, Orit Shefi and co-workers exploit studies of platforms generated with a range of physical topographies, from micro- down to nano- scale, that interact effectively with neurons, affecting differentiation, outgrowth and activity. Matching these specific needs may advance therapies and brain-machine interface applications.

  3. Inside Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Masthead
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Progress Reports
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Full Papers
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      Cell Alignment: Control of Cell Alignment and Morphology by Redesigning ECM-Mimetic Nanotopography on Multilayer Membranes (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 15/2017)

      Maria P. Sousa, Sofia G. Caridade and João F. Mano

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201770079

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      Natural-based and biomimetic multilayer membranes, whose surface resembles the nanotopography of the native extracellular matrix, are able to induce cellular alignment along with the pattern direction. João F. Mano and co-workers use a simple layer-by-layer technology to produce such platforms, that can be a promising system to control cell behavior and to regenerate tissues, in article number 1601462.

  4. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Masthead
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Progress Reports
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Full Papers
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      Cell Culture: Clickable Microgel Scaffolds as Platforms for 3D Cell Encapsulation (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 15/2017)

      Alexander S. Caldwell, Gavin T. Campbell, Kelly M. T. Shekiro and Kristi S. Anseth

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201770080

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      Clickable microgel scaffolds as platforms for 3D cell encapsulation are described in article number 1700254 by Kristi S. Anseth and co-workers. Microgel “building blocks” are designed and assembled in the presence of cells to create polymer-cell composites. Cell growth within the network can be controlled and directed by altering microgel size.

  5. Masthead

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    5. Back Cover
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    10. Progress Reports
    11. Communications
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      Masthead: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 15/2017)

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201770078

  6. Contents

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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Masthead
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
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    10. Progress Reports
    11. Communications
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      Contents: (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 15/2017)

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201770076

  7. Editorial

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    5. Back Cover
    6. Masthead
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Progress Reports
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
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      Biomimetic Interfaces in Biomedical Devices

      João F. Mano, Insung S. Choi and Ali Khademhosseini

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201700761

  8. Reviews

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    5. Back Cover
    6. Masthead
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Progress Reports
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Full Papers
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      Materials for Microfluidic Immunoassays: A Review

      Lei Mou and Xingyu Jiang

      Version of Record online: 21 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201601403

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      Microfluidic immunoassays for point-of-care diagnostics can detect biomarkers in a faster and easier way compared to traditional approaches. This Review reports on the materials-related aspects of the recent advances in microfluidic immunoassays including materials for chips fabrication and materials for improving the performance of immunoassays. Some clinical practice, and commercial products in the market have also been discussed.

  9. Progress Reports

    1. Top of page
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    6. Masthead
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Progress Reports
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
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      Interactions of Neurons with Physical Environments

      Michal Marcus, Koby Baranes, Matthew Park, Insung S. Choi, Kyungtae Kang and Orit Shefi

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201700267

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Neurons rely on physical signals throughout development and regeneration. Recent advances in fabrication and materials led to the development of 2D and 3D engineered platforms that can mimic the native extracellular environment. This Progress Report exploits studies of platforms generated with a range of physical topographies, from micro- down to nano- scale, that interact effectively with neurons, affecting differentiation, outgrowth and activity. Matching these specific needs may advance therapies and brain-machine interface applications.

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      Mechanotransduction and Growth Factor Signalling to Engineer Cellular Microenvironments

      Amaia Cipitria and Manuel Salmeron-Sanchez

      Version of Record online: 8 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201700052

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      The combination of physical stimuli and growth factor is essential to engineer advanced cellular microenvironments with impact in stem cell technologies, cancer research and regenerative medicine. This progress report discusses the role of properties such as stiffness, geometry, viscoelasticity and other dynamic properties as well as their combination with growth factor presentation in controlling (stem) cell behaviour.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    5. Back Cover
    6. Masthead
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Progress Reports
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Full Papers
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      Rod-Shaped Neural Units for Aligned 3D Neural Network Connection

      Midori Kato-Negishi, Hiroaki Onoe, Akane Ito and Shoji Takeuchi

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201700143

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Assembly of four cortical units—fabricated microfiber-shaped neural tissues with cortical cells. Each unit has an insulated region covered with a thin alginate hydrogel layer to prevent the encapsulated neural tissues from connecting to surrounding cells within the regions; the edges of the unit are connectable, with the spherical ends functioning as glue to connect with other units.

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      Biomimetic Model of Tumor Microenvironment on Microfluidic Platform

      Minhwan Chung, Jungho Ahn, Kyungmin Son, Sudong Kim and Noo Li Jeon

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201700196

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      A biomimetic tumor microenvironment model that mimics simultaneous angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis toward tumor mass is created in microfluidic platform. Tumor–stromal mixture induces natural morphogenesis of endothelial cells to migrate through 3D fibrin matrix and interacts directly with the tumor cells. This model can potentially be used not only in drug evaluation but also in studying complex tumor microenvironment systematically.

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      Modulation of Heterotypic and Homotypic Cell–Cell Interactions via Zwitterionic Lipid Masks

      Matthew Park, Wongu Youn, Doyeon Kim, Eun Hyea Ko, Beom Jin Kim, Sung Min Kang, Kyungtae Kang and Insung S. Choi

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201700063

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      Easily removable, cell-repellant masks are developed based on zwitterioinic lipids to spatio-selectively seed cells for the study of cell–cell interactions. Prior fabrication methods have often required restrictive conditions or technically complex procedures, but this lipid-based strategy offers a simple and highly biocompatible means of restricting cell adhesion to specified areas, allowing for studies on heterotypic cocultures and collective migration.

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      Bioinspired Pollen-Like Hierarchical Surface for Efficient Recognition of Target Cancer Cells

      Wenshuo Wang, Gao Yang, Haijun Cui, Jingxin Meng, Shutao Wang and Lei Jiang

      Version of Record online: 4 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201700003

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      A pollen-like hierarchical surface is developed by combining a filtering-assisted assembly method and soft lithography. The as-prepared surface can enable the capture of target cancer cells with high efficiency and specificity after modification with recognition agent. The work represents a good example of constructing cell recognition biointerfaces inspired by pollen–stigma adhesion.

  11. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Masthead
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Progress Reports
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Full Papers
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      Cell Adhesion: The Role of Titanium Surface Nanostructuring on Preosteoblast Morphology, Adhesion, and Migration (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 15/2017)

      Yulia Zhukova, Christian Hiepen, Petra Knaus, Marc Osterland, Steffen Prohaska, John W. C. Dunlop, Peter Fratzl and Ekaterina V. Skorb

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201770077

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      A kaleidoscope of surface properties guides a kaleidoscope of cell dynamic behavior and communication with a nanoarchitectured support. In article number 1601244, Peter Fratzl and co-workers focus on the impact of different titania nanotopography on osteo-progenitor cell adhesion, stress fiber formation and migration.

  12. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Inside Back Cover
    5. Back Cover
    6. Masthead
    7. Contents
    8. Editorial
    9. Reviews
    10. Progress Reports
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Full Papers
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      The Role of Titanium Surface Nanostructuring on Preosteoblast Morphology, Adhesion, and Migration

      Yulia Zhukova, Christian Hiepen, Petra Knaus, Marc Osterland, Steffen Prohaska, John W. C. Dunlop, Peter Fratzl and Ekaterina V. Skorb

      Version of Record online: 30 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201601244

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      Different nanotopologies are generated on the surface of titanium implants by ultrasound treatment (left) and by anodic oxidation (right). The structural differences influence morphology and migration behavior of preosteoblastic cells growing on these surfaces. A quantitative wound healing assay in combination with live-cell imaging reveals more collective cell migration behavior on the disordered mesoporous surfaces generated by sonochemistry (left).

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      Control of Cell Alignment and Morphology by Redesigning ECM-Mimetic Nanotopography on Multilayer Membranes

      Maria P. Sousa, Sofia G. Caridade and João F. Mano

      Version of Record online: 29 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201601462

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Flexible and freestanding biomimetic multilayer membranes, which topography resemble the nanofeatures of the extracellular matrix, are successfully developed using a friendly user layer-by-layer technology. The ability to crosslink with genipin as well as the presence of a patterned topography on the surface of the natural-based membranes provides a promising system to tailor cellular behavior including cell alignment and differentiation.

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      Clickable Microgel Scaffolds as Platforms for 3D Cell Encapsulation

      Alexander S. Caldwell, Gavin T. Campbell, Kelly M. T. Shekiro and Kristi S. Anseth

      Version of Record online: 9 MAY 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201700254

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Microgel “building blocks” are designed and assembled in the presence of cells to create polymer-cell composites. These materials have highly tunable mechanical and chemical properties, allowing for a highly versatile cell culture platform.

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      Bacterial Interactions with Immobilized Liquid Layers

      Yevgen Kovalenko, Irini Sotiri, Jaakko V. I. Timonen, Jonathan C. Overton, Gareth Holmes, Joanna Aizenberg and Caitlin Howell

      Version of Record online: 8 DEC 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201600948

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      The number of bacterial cells adherent on an immobilized liquid layer of silicone oil is significantly affected by the presence or absence of orbital flow, the species of bacteria, and the bacterial cell morphology. In all tested experimental conditions, however, immobilized liquid layers show superior resistance to irreversible bacterial adhesion compared to equivalent solid polydimethylsiloxane surfaces.

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      Small Subcompartmentalized Microreactors as Support for Hepatocytes

      Yan Zhang, Marie Baekgaard-Laursen and Brigitte Städler

      Version of Record online: 30 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201601141

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      Hepatic bionic tissue is assembled using hepatocytes and sub 10 µm sized core–shell or capsosome-based microreactors. Positive surface charge shows the best integration of the synthetic entities in the proliferating tissue. Upon stressing the bionic tissue with hydrogen peroxide, core–shell microreactors loaded with catalase can alleviate the pressure and improve the viability to the hepatocytes.

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      Selectively Inducing Cancer Cell Death by Intracellular Enzyme-Instructed Self-Assembly (EISA) of Dipeptide Derivatives

      Jie Li, Junfeng Shi, Jamie E. Medina, Jie Zhou, Xuewen Du, Huaimin Wang, Cuihong Yang, Jianfeng Liu, Zhimou Yang, Daniela M. Dinulescu and Bing Xu

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201601400

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      A novel process—enzyme-instructed self-assembly (EISA)—to kill cancer cells selectively is reported. We designed two precursors that became self-assembling molecules upon the catalysis of carboxylesterases (CES)–a type of enzyme overexpressed in cancer cells. By amplifying the enzymatic difference between cancer and normal cells, this work provided a new approach for cancer therapy.

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      Desmoplastic Reaction in 3D-Pancreatic Cancer Tissues Suppresses Molecular Permeability

      Michiya Matsusaki, Misaki Komeda, Simona Mura, Hiroyoshi Y. Tanaka, Mitsunobu R. Kano, Patrick Couvreur and Mitsuru Akashi

      Version of Record online: 27 APR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201700057

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      Design and characterization of in vitro pancreatic cancer–stromal 3D-tissues are reported, which enhance the current understanding of the interactions between cancer cells and fibroblasts and characterize the influence on the secretion of extracellular matrix (ECM). The 3D-pancreatic cancer tissues display a decrease in molecular permeability with increasing secretion of ECM proteins through cancer–stromal cell interactions.

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      Transdermal Protein Delivery Using Choline and Geranate (CAGE) Deep Eutectic Solvent

      Amrita Banerjee, Kelly Ibsen, Yasunori Iwao, Michael Zakrewsky and Samir Mitragotri

      Version of Record online: 24 MAR 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201601411

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      Choline and geranate (CAGE) significantly enhances transdermal protein delivery. CAGE acts as an effective material for transdermal drug delivery. Proteins simply dispersed in CAGE retain their secondary conformation and traverse through the skin to demonstrate significantly higher in vivo efficacy compared to proteins in buffer.

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