Advanced Materials

Electrochromic Materials for optical switching devices

Authors

  • Dr. Klaus Bange,

    1. Schott Glaswerke, Forschung und Entwicklung, Otto-Schott-Straße, D-6500 Mainz (FRG)
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    • studied physics at the Technical University of Berlin (West) before working as a research physicist at the Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft in Berlin and at the National Bureau of Standards in Washington, USA with special interests in surface science, electrochemistry and semiconductors. Dr. Bange then worked for Siemens in Berlin where he was responsible for the process development of thin film production before joining the Schott Glaswerke, Mainz, FRG in 1987 where he is responsible for the development and characterization of thin films for electrochromic devices and for optical and protective purposes. He is head of the electron microscopy and thin film analysis department and has authored over 35 publications.

  • Dr. Thomas Gambke

    1. Schott Glaswerke, Forschung und Entwicklung, Otto-Schott-Straße, D-6500 Mainz (FRG)
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    • studied physics in Darmstadt, FRG gaining his Diploma in 1976 and his Ph.D. in 1981. He then spent a year at the University of California, San Diego, USA specializing in solid state physics, magnetism, thin films and superconductivity, work which he continued at the VDI Technology Center, Berlin (West) from 1982–1984. Since then he has been the Manager of the Thin Film Development department at Schott Glaswerke, Mainz, FRG where his special interests are optical thin films, electrochromism and the thin film design of electrochromic devices (ECDs).


  • We thank U. Martens and J. Strubel for technical assistance. This work has been supported in part by the BMFT.

Abstract

The basic principles of electrochromism have been reported and discussed using the example of WO3, and some other important electrochromic materials have been described which have a number of interesting technical applications. Both compounds and materials used in ECDs were discussed and the principles of device design were portrayed, using as an example a reflective ASSD. By continuing the search for new electrochromic compounds and by further improving device design and cost optimization the applications of these materials are bound to increase.

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