Electroceramics: Characterization by Impedance Spectroscopy

Authors

  • Dr. John T. S. Irvine,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Aberdeen Meston Building, Meston Walk, Old Aberdeen AB9 2UE (Scotland)
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    • has B.Sc. Chemical Physics (Edinburgh 1981) and Ph.D. (Ulster 1986) degrees. He came to Aberdeen in 1985 where he has been research fellow, Royal Society of Edinburgh Research Fellow and now, Lecturer in chemistry. His Ph.D. topic was on photelectrochemistry and his research interests have expanded to include high-Tc ceramic superconductors, solid electrolytes and solid state electrochemistry.

  • Dr. Derek C. Sinclair,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Aberdeen Meston Building, Meston Walk, Old Aberdeen AB9 2UE (Scotland)
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    • obtained his B.Sc. (1986) and Ph.D. (1989) from Aberdeen University and is currently a Research Fellow in the Chemistry Department. His Ph.D. topic was on the characterization of electroceramics and he is currently researching into high-Tc superconductors.

  • Prof. Anthony R. West

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Aberdeen Meston Building, Meston Walk, Old Aberdeen AB9 2UE (Scotland)
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    • has B.Sc. (Wales 1968), Ph.D. (Aberdeen 1971) and D.Sc. (Aberdeen 1984) degrees. He has been, successively, Lecturer, Senior Lecturer and Reader in chemistry and in 1989 was appointed to a personal professorship in Aberdeen. His research covers many aspects of solid state chemistry and ceramics, and he is author of about 180 research publications and the books ‘Solid State Chemistry and its Applications’ and ‘Basic Solid State Chemistry’.


Abstract

Electroceramics are advanced materials whose properties and applications depend on the close control of structure, composition, ceramic texture, dopants and dopant (or defect) distribution. Impedance spectroscopy is a powerful technique for unravelling the complexities of such materials, which functions by utilizing the different frequency dependences of the constituent components for their separation. Thus, electrical inhomogeneities in ceramic electrolytes, electrode/electrolyte interfaces, surface layers on glasses, ferroelectricity, positive temperature coefficient of resistance behavior and even ferrimagnetism can all be probed, successfully, using this technique.

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