Advanced Materials

Ceramics from organometallic polymers

Authors

  • Dr. Marcell Peuckert,

    1. Materialforschung, Hoechst AG Postfach 80 03 20, D-6230 Frankfurt am Main 80 (FRG)
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    • Marcell Peuckert studied chemistry at the RWTH Aachen, gaining his Diploma in 1977. He then spent one year at Stanford University before returning to Aachen where he finished his Pd.D. with a study of homogeneous catalysi in 1980. Then he joined the Nuclear Research Center in Jülich investigating the surface chemistry of noble metal electrocatalysts and zeolites. Since 1984 he ha been conducting research in the Materials Science Department at Hoechst AG in Frankfurt, FRG, including a six month period at the Max-Planck-Institut für Metallforschung in Stuttgart. His major interests at Hoechst are proceramic polymers, silicon niride ceramic and high- Tc superconductors. He is now project manager of a program on HTSC.

  • Dr. Tilo Vaahs,

    1. Materialforschung, Hoechst AG Postfach 80 03 20, D-6230 Frankfurt am Main 80 (FRG)
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  • Martin Brück

    1. Materialforschung, Hoechst AG Postfach 80 03 20, D-6230 Frankfurt am Main 80 (FRG)
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  • The authors wish to thank F. Aldinger, P. Foley, H.-J. Kleiner, K. Kühlein and G. Siegemund for many interesting discussions and continuous support of the work. For the NMR measurements we owe thanks to H. Kluge.

Abstract

Materials science, an interdisciplinary field of R & D, certainly benefits from the cooperation of engineers, chemists and physicists. An example is in the synthesis and applications development of organometallic polymers. Their structures are being optimized through employing different monomers, polymer blending, and post-treatments to render them suitable as precursors for non-oxide advanced ceramics like SiC, Si3N4, AIN, BN or TiN. Pyrolysis transforms these polymers into the ceramic state. Since these inorganic polymers have unique processing advantages (solubility and fusibility) over classical ceramic powder or metallurgical processing, a vast array of novel applications, e.g., ceramic coatings, binders, impregnations or spun fibers are possible.

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