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Advanced Materials

Silicon molecular beam epitaxy

Authors

  • Dr. Dirk J. Gravesteijn,

    1. Philips Research Laboratories P.O. Box 80000, NL-5600 JA Eindhoven (The Netherlands)
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    • Gravesteijn joined Philips Research Laboratories in 1979 after completing his Ph. D. at the University of Amsterdam. Until 1981 he worked on transport properties of conducting polymers. From 1981–1988 he was involved in research into materials for optical data disks, mainly infrared-absorbing dyes for write-once data storage, and phase-change materials for erasable data storage. He spent one year at DuPont's Experimental Station in Wilmington (DE), USA, and since 1988 he has been working in the field of silicon molecular beam epitaxy.

  • Dr. Gerjan F. A. van De Walle,

    1. Philips Research Laboratories P.O. Box 80000, NL-5600 JA Eindhoven (The Netherlands)
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    • Received his masters degree in physics in 1982, after which he worked on scanning tunneling microscopy at the University of Nijmegen, as part of a Ph. D. study. On graduation, in 1986, he joined Philips Research Laboratories to work on silicon molecular beam epitaxy materials research and device applications.

  • Dr. Aart A. van Gorkum

    1. Philips Research Laboratories P.O. Box 80000, NL-5600 JA Eindhoven (The Netherlands)
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    • Received his Ph. D. at the technical university of Delft in 1980, based on work performed at the National Research Council in Ottawa, Canada, on thermal helium desorption spectrometry. In 1980 he joined Philips and carried out research on electron-gun design for high-resolution CRTs until 1985. From 1985 to 1988 he worked on silicon MBE, with a one year stay at the Hitachi Central Research Laboratories in Tokyo, Japan. Since 1988, he has been responsible for a group working on advanced semiconductor materials.


Abstract

Recent results in the field of silicon molecular beam epitaxy (Si[BOND]MBE) are reviewed. Emphasis is put on the possibility of doping-profile engineering, as in delta-doped layers. Heteroepitaxy of Si1 −xGex on Si is discussed in detail. Due to the band-gap narrowing in the Si1 −xGex several improved devices can be designed, such as heterojunction bipolar transistors and modulation-doped structures which show potential for improved field-effect transistors. An exciting area of research involves superlattices consisting of repetitions of layers of Si and Ge, each with a thickness of only a few atomic layers.

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