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Advanced Materials

Designing Luminescent Materials

Authors

  • Dr. Michael Bredol,

    1. Philips Research Laboratories Weisshausstrasse, Postfach 1980, W-5100 Aachen (FRG)
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    • Received his Diploma and Doctorate degree in physical chemistry from the University of Münster, West Germany, where he had been working on the solid-state chemitry of III–VI/II–VI semiconductor systems. In 1987, he joined the Philips Research Laboratories in Aachen, West Germany. Since then he has been involved in the field of optical-fiber technology and is now active in a project dealing with luminescent materials for CRTs.

  • Dr. Ulrich Kynast,

    1. Philips Research Laboratories Weisshausstrasse, Postfach 1980, W-5100 Aachen (FRG)
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    • Studied chemistry at the University of Marburg, both his Diploma and Ph. D. theses dealing with the reactions of heterocyclic nitrogen–sulfur- and transition metal compounds. In 1984 and 1985 he subsequently did research on organometallic topics in the USA and Australia as a postdoc. He joined Philips in 1986, where he is currently evaluating the properties of encapsulated luminescence centers.

  • Dr. Cornelis Ronda

    1. Philips Research Laboratories Weisshausstrasse, Postfach 1980, W-5100 Aachen (FRG)
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    • Received his Diploma and Ph. D. degrees in solid-state chemistry from the State University of Groningen, the Netherlands, where he had been studying the electronic properties of layered transition-metal chalcogenides and the optical properties of layered metal halides. He joined the Philips Research Laboratories in Eindhoven, the Netherlands in 1986 and the Philips Research Laboratories in Aachen, Germany in 1989. Since joining Philips, the author has been working in the field of luminescent materials.


Abstract

Review: Non-conventional phosphor host materials such as cryptands (see Figure) or zeolites now offer potential alternatives to the traditional inorganic solid-state materials which find applications in e.g. fluorescent lamps, T.V. sets, or X-ray detectors. Recent efforts to further optimize conventional materials are reviewed and a forward look is taken at the new-generation materials which could further extend the physical limits of luminescence.

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