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Synthetic routes to high surface area non-oxide materials

Authors

  • Richard W. Chorley,

    1. Shell Research B. V., Koninklijke/Shell-Laboratorium Amsterdam Badhuisweg 3, NL-1031 CM Amsterdam (The Netherlands)
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    • Was born in Cambridge, UK, in 1966 and studied natural sciences at the University of Cambridge, graduating in chemistry in 1987. He carried out post-graduate work in Professor M. F. Lappert's group at the University of Sussex, UK, researching into aspects of the chemistry of tin complexes containing sterically demanding amido substituents. Part of this work was carried out in collaboration with the Koninklijke/Shell-Laboratorium, Amsterdam, NL, where he has recently taken up a position as a research chemist.

  • Dr. Peter W. Lednor

    1. Shell Research B. V., Koninklijke/Shell-Laboratorium Amsterdam Badhuisweg 3, NL-1031 CM Amsterdam (The Netherlands)
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    • Was born in Scarborough, UK, in 1949, and was awarded a B.Sc. in Chemistry from the University of Manchester in 1971. He received a D. Phil. degree from the University of Sussex in 1974 for work with Professor M. F. Lappert on free radical organometallic chemistry. Following post-doctoral work with Professor W. Beck at the University of Munich, and with Dr. H. Felkin at CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette, France, he joined the Koninklijke/Shell-Laboratorium, Amsterdam, NL, in 1978. His recent research there has been concerned with the synthesis and application in catalysis of inorganic materials.


  • The authors would like to thank Prof. M. F. Lappert, F.R.S., for his encouragement, and interest in the preparation of this article.

Abstract

Review: Non-oxide ceramic compositions, such as carbides, nitrides, borides, and sulfides, in their compacted forms show outstanding mechanical strength and resistance to wear. These properties depend a defect-free microstructure which can best be obtained through the use of homogeneous, high surface area powdered starting materials. The methods of preparing such powders, and also their use in other applications, such as catalysis, are reviewed.

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