Ferroelectric liquid crystals in high information content displays

Authors

  • Dr. Claus Escher,

    Corresponding author
    1. GFP/FLC Hoechst AG W-6230 Frankfurt am Main 80 (FRG)
    • GFP/FLC Hoechst AG W-6230 Frankfurt am Main 80 (FRG)
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    • Studied physics at the University of Münster and at the Technische Hochschule at Anchen from which he received his doctor's degree in theoretical physics in 1979. He worked at Stanford University as a post-doc in the group of John Ross before, joining Merck in Darmstadt, Germany, carrying out research on liquid crystals. In 1986 he moved to Hoechst in Frankfurt where he is currently heading the FLC-physics group within the New Research Products Section.

  • Dr. Rainer Wingen

    Corresponding author
    1. GFP/FLC Hoechst AG W-6230 Frankfurt am Main 80 (FRG)
    • GFP/FLC Hoechst AG W-6230 Frankfurt am Main 80 (FRG)
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    • Studied chemistry at the University of Bonn gaining his doctorate in 1979. In 1980 he joined the Corporate Research division of Hoechst in Frankfurt and since 1986 he has been head of the FLC-chamistry group which is now part of the New Research Products Section. He has published 5 papers and holds 11 patents relating to his work on liquid crystals.


  • The authors gratefully acknowledge helpful discussions with their colleagues G. Illian, D. Jungbauer, A. Kaltheitzei, J. Manero, D. Ohlendorf, N. Rösch, H. Schlosser, and P. Wegener. [AMRI I4]

Abstract

Rugged, light, high-resolution flat panel displays are now being developed using liquid-crystal (LC) technology with the aim of replacing cathode ray tubes in for example computer monitors and televisions. The basic concepts of the displays are described, the advantages and drawbacks of the most important technologies are compared, and some recent work on ferroelectric LC displays which promise high contrast and brightness (see figure) is reviewed.

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