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Advanced Materials

Synthesis, processing sand properties of thermotropic liquid-crystal polymers

Authors

  • Dr. Hyun N. Yoon,

    Corresponding author
    1. Hoechst Celanese Research Division 86 Morris Avenue, Summit, NJ 07901 (USA)
    • Hoechst Celanese Research Division 86 Morris Avenue, Summit, NJ 07901 (USA)
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    • Received a B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Seoul Nutional University in 1968 and a Ph.D. in polymer sciencefrom Rutgers University in 1975. After two years us a post doc at McGill University he joined the then Celanese Research Company in 1977. He is currently a senior research associate at Hoechst Celanese and is responsible for materials research on nonlinear optical polymers. He is a member of the OSA, the APS, and the ACS.

  • Dr. Larry F. Charbonneau,

    Corresponding author
    1. Hoechst Celanese Research Division 86 Morris Avenue, Summit, NJ 07901 (USA)
    • Hoechst Celanese Research Division 86 Morris Avenue, Summit, NJ 07901 (USA)
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    • Research Supervisor in the Nonlinear Optics Department of the Hoechst Celanese Research Division. He studied chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Campaign, gaining his Ph.D. in 1972 before joining the General Motors Research Laboratories. In 1977 he moved to the Celanese Research Company where he has held a number of research positions, working on both liquid-crystalline polymers and nonlinear optics. He has uthored over 40 patents and publications on aspects of this work.

  • Dr. Gordon W. Calundann

    Corresponding author
    1. Hoechst Celanese Research Division 86 Morris Avenue, Summit, NJ 07901 (USA)
    • Hoechst Celanese Research Division 86 Morris Avenue, Summit, NJ 07901 (USA)
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    • Been with the Hoechst Celanese Corporation for 25 years holding several research positions and is presently Director of Strategy Development for the Advanced Materials Group. He received a Ph.D. in chemistry from Purdue University in 1967 bejore joining the then Celanese Research Company. He holds over 40 patents, many in the field of thermotropic liquid-crystalline polymers, and is the inventor of the Vectra family of polymers now in commercial use in engineering resin andfiber forms.


  • The authors gratefully acknowledge the contributions made by current and former colleagues from the Hoechst Celanese Research Division, especially, Drs. K. Wissbrun and M. Jaffe. [AMR116]

Abstract

Thermotropic liquid-crystal polymers for high-performance applications are typically based on wholly aromatic polyester and polyamide architectures. The linear character of the aromtic monomers produces polymer chains with stiff, extended conformations. As a result, the chains organize themselves into a nematic melt and readily orient in response to processing flow fields. The close coupling between chain orientation and flow fields produces both a rich variety of materials and a high degree of controllability of their structure and properties (such as the tensile strength, elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion). In this paper, we describe synthetic efforts to develop liquid-crystal polymer structures and the relationships between chain molecular structure, processing, and properties of this class of polymers in two distinct processing situations: Injection molding and fiber formation. The special importance of the orientational flow field in developing high orientation and excellent mechanical properties will be highlighted.

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