Advanced Materials

Molecular materials for second-order nonlinear optical applications

Authors

  • Dr. Seth R. Marder,

    Corresponding author
    1. Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (USA)
    2. Molecular Materials Resource Center, The Beckman Institute, California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125 (USA)
    • Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (USA)
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    • was born in New York City in 1961. He obtained a BA in chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1981 and carried out doctoral studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison under the direction of Charles Casey. Following two years of postdoctoral studies at the University of Oxford he spent a year as a National Research Council Resident Research Associate at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). He is currently a Member of the Technical Staff at JPL and a Member of the Beckman Institute at the California Institute of Technology. His research interests include strucutre–property relationships for nonlinear optical materials, the development of organometallic dyes and applications of dyes in medicine.

  • Dr. Joseph W. Perry

    1. Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (USA)
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    • was born in Detroit in 1955. He received a BS in Natural Scineces (Chemistry) from the University of South Florida and studied for his doctorate at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Ahmed Zewail. He spent a year as a postdoctoral fellow at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg. He is currently associate supervisor of the Optoelectronic Materials Group at JPL. In 1992 he received a NASA medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement. His research interests include investigation of the molecular origin of nonlinear optical properties, the development of nonlinear optical materials and devices, and spectroscopic studies of electron transfer processes in condensed phases.


Abstract

Strategies for the optimization of molecular second-order nonlinearities have emerged over the past few years, but significant questions still remain. This review highlights recent conceptual advances in the field of nonlinear optical molecular materials, concentrating on design criteria for the molecules themselves, e.g., the influence of resonance structures, bond length alternation, and reduced aromaticity, and the use of organometallic compounds and octupolar molecules. Factors affecting the properties of bulk materials composed of such molecules are also discussed.

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