Advanced Materials

Shock Compression Synthesis of Diamond

Authors

  • Prof. Akira B. Sawaoka,

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Ceramics Research, Tokyo Institute of Technology Midori, Yokohama 227 (Japan)
    • Center for Ceramics Research, Tokyo Institute of Technology Midori, Yokohama 227 (Japan)
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    • after graduating, from Hokkaido University, began static high pressure research as a research associate at Osaka University. Since 1969 he has been involved in dynamic high pressure research on materials at Tokyo Institute of Technology. He has published more than 200 original papers.

  • Masanobu Takamatsu,

    1. Center for Ceramics Research, Tokyo Institute of Technology Midori, Yokohama 227 (Japan)
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    • majored in Mechanical Engineering at Yokohama Technical College and is a Bachelor of Liberal Arts and Sciences of the University of the Air. As a manager of R & D projects, he developed many devices and techniques, for example, for pneumatic–hydraulic impact and non-explosive two-stage light gas guns, and achieved shock synthesis of diamond using a method he invented.

  • Dr. Tamotsu Akashi

    1. Hokkaido Technical Laboratory, Sumitomo Coal Mining Co. Akabira 485 (Japan)
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    • is a research engineer at Sumitomo Coal Mining Co. Ltd., Japan. He received his Ph.D. in materials science from Tokyo Institute of Technology in 1987. His research interests focus on materials processing technology using the shock wave, self-propagating high-temperature synthesis, and spark sintering processes. He has published more than 15 papers in areas related to this work.


Abstract

Easily obtainable polycrystalline diamond would have many additional applications in industry. Of the synthesis techniques currently in use, shock compression is one of the most promising, crack formation being its major problem. The production of compacts from diamond powders (see Figure) is described and a technique introduced in which the exothermic chemical reaction of additives is used to control the temperature distribution in a compact and thus avoid cracks.

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