Advanced Materials

Raman Scattering in C60 fullerenes and fullerides

Authors

  • Prof. Hans Kuzmany,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institut für Festkörperphysik, Universität Wien Strudlhofgasse 4, A-1090 Wien (Austria)
    • Institut für Festkörperphysik, Universität Wien Strudlhofgasse 4, A-1090 Wien (Austria)
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    • studied physics at the Universities of Vienna and Heidelberg, being awarded a Ph.D. in 1965, for work in the field of metal physics. After a time as a research assistant at the Institute of Physics, University of Vienna, he spent two years at the Council for Scientijk and Industrial Research in Pretoria, South Africa, working on colloids in ionic crystals. Since 1969 he has been basedmainly at the Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Vienna, where his research has ranged over many topics, including semiconductors and surface acoustic waves, Raman and IR spectroscopy, quasi-one-dimensional solids andpolymers, high- temperature superconductors, carbynes, and fullerenes.

  • Dr. Michael Matus,

    1. Institut für Festkörperphysik, Universität Wien Strudlhofgasse 4, A-1090 Wien (Austria)
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  • Bernhard Burger,

    1. Institut für Festkörperphysik, Universität Wien Strudlhofgasse 4, A-1090 Wien (Austria)
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  • Johannes Winter

    1. Institut für Festkörperphysik, Universität Wien Strudlhofgasse 4, A-1090 Wien (Austria)
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  • This work was supported by the Fonds zur Förderung der Wissenschaftlichen Forschung in Österreich, project P09741-TEC.

Abstract

Buckminsterfullerene and related systems possess a strong chromophoric character resulting from the sp2 hybridization of their valence electrons. As a result, Raman scattering can be used to reveal details of the physical properties and doping dynamics, also allowing the study of the effects of chemical modifications of these systems. Due to the high symmetry of the molecules the spectra at first appear rather simple. However, crystal field effects and general symmetry breaking conditions can also be studied.

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