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Optically Polarized 129Xe in NMR Spectroscopy*

Authors

  • Prof. Tanja Pietraiß,

    Corresponding author
    1. Materials Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Department of Chemistry University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA)
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Chemistry, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorr, NM 87801 (USA)
    • Materials Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Department of Chemistry University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA)
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    • Studied chemistry at the Technical University of Munich, Germany, gaining her Ph.D. in 1992 for work on solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei in the group of P. K. Burkert. From 1992-1995 she was a post-doctora1 fellow with A. Pines at the University of California at Berkeley working mainly on the applications of optical pumping in NMR spectroscopy. In 1995 she moved to a post-doctoral position at the University Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg, France, and has recently joined the faculty at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology.

  • Prof. Holly C. Gaede

    1. Materials Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Department of Chemistry University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA)
    Current affiliation:
    1. Ursinus College. Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 1000. Collegeville, PA 19426-1000 (USA)
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    • Holly Gaede studied chemistry at the University of Delaware, being awarded her B. S. in 1991. She then moved to the University of California, Berkeley, and was awarded her Ph.D. in 1995 for work on the development of NMR techniques with optically polarized xenon in the group of A. Pines. She has recently joined the faculty at Ursinus College in Collegeville, Pennsylvania.


  • *

    We thank A. Pines and W. Happer for comments and suggestions and W. Happer for the permission to use his figures. This work was funded by the Director, Office of Energy Research. Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences Division, U. S. Department of Energy. under Contract Number DEAC03-SF00098. The authors are indebted to their colleagues and co-workers, particularly those at Berkeley, for much of the work that is contained herein.

Abstract

129 Xe has found widespread applications in NMR spectroscopy, but its use is often restricted by its low sensitivity and long relaxation times. Optical pumping of rubidium followed by spin exchange with xenon provides a well understood technique to enhance the 129 XePolarization by several orders of magnitude. The exploitation of this highly spin-polarized xenon as a surface probe in NMR studies of various meterials is discussed. Applications of this technique make use not only of 129Xe NMR detection, but also of the-high spin polarization as a magnetization reservoir for selective cross-polarization experiments to surface nuclei. A diverse variety of materials has been studied, ranging from mesoscopic structures such as semiconductor nanocrystals and porous silicon to high surface area polymers.

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