Electronically conducting polymers and activated carbon: Electrode materials in supercapacitor technology

Authors

  • Prof. Marina Mastragostino,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Palermo, Department of Physical Chemistry via Archirafi 26, I-90123 Palermo (Italy)
    • University of Palermo, Department of Physical Chemistry via Archirafi 26, I–90123 Palermo (Italy)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Catia Arbizzani,

    1. University of Bologna, Department of Chemistry ‘G. Ciamican’ via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna (Italy)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Luca Meneghello,

    1. University of Bologna, Department of Chemistry ‘G. Ciamican’ via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna (Italy)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. Ruggero Paraventi

    1. University of Bologna, Department of Chemistry ‘G. Ciamican’ via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna (Italy)
    Search for more papers by this author

  • We thank Dr. M. Catellani, Istituto di Chimica delle Macromolecole, CNR, Milano (ltaly) who synthesized the DTT, and CNR, Progetto Strategico Batterie leggere per auto elettriche-Supercapacitori redox, for financial support.

Abstract

Supercapacitors are now attracting much attention as battery-complementary devices for applications requiring high operating power levels, such as in electric vehicle technology. Two types of supercapacitors with different modes of energy storage are currently under study: the double-layer, and the redox. Electronically conducting polymers represent an interesting class of electro-active materials for redox supercapacitors and can be applied in different configurations. Performance data for new and conventional devices are presented and compared to those of a double-layer capacitor with activated carbon electrodes.

Ancillary