The design and synthesis of Heterogeneous Catalyst Systems

Authors

  • Dr. Norman Herron,

    Corresponding author
    1. Central Science and Engineering Laboratories The DuPont Company P.O. Box 80328, Wilmington, DE 19880-0328 (USA)
    • Central Science and Engineering Laboratories The DuPont Company P.O. Box 80328, Wilmington, DE 19880-0328 (USA)
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    • Norman Herron received a B.Sc. (1975) and Ph.D. in inorganic coordination chemistry (1978) at The University of Warwick, UK, under the direction of Professor Peter Moore. He was a post-doctoral fellow at The Ohio State University with Professor Daryle Busch (1979–83), where he worked on macrocyclic, oxygen-carrier molecules. He joined the Central Science and Engineering Department of the DuPont Co. in 1983. Following work on zeolite inclusion catalysts (“ships-in-bottles”) and semiconductor nanoclusters (“quantum dots”), his current research focuses on aspects of heterogeneous fluorocarbon and oxidation catalysis. He is the author of more than 110 publications, 6 book chapters, 12 patents and has co-edited a volume on zeolite inclusion chemistry.

  • Dr. William E. Farneth

    1. Central Science and Engineering Laboratories The DuPont Company P.O. Box 80328, Wilmington, DE 19880-0328 (USA)
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    • William E. Farneth is a Senior Research Associate in the Central Science and Engineering Department of the DuPont Co. He received a B.A. in Chemistry from Cornell University in 1971, a Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1975, and carried out post-doctoral research at Columbia University. He joined DuPont in 1983 after several years as an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at the University of Minnesota. He is interested in understanding how chemical reactions work, especially under heterogeneous conditions. This interest has led him to research programs in a variety of areas of mechanistic chemistry, including surface chemistry of solid oxides and acids, degradation reactions of polymers, semiconductor photocatalysis, laser-induced chemistry, and redox reactions of cuprate superconductors.


  • The work described in this article is the result of collaborations and discussions with our colleagues, Dr. Y. Wang, Dr. D. R. Corbin, Dr. D. L. Thorn, Dr. C. A. Tolman, Dr. R. L. Harlow, Dr. G. D. Stucky, Dr. M. J. Nappa, Dr. S. D. Ittel, Dr. T. Bein, Dr. K. Moeller, Dr. L. Abrams, Dr. W. C. Seidel, Dr. R. Gorte, Dr. M. Aronson, Dr. T. Kofte, Dr. D. Parillo, and Dr. C. Lee, while the technical assistance of Mr. J. B. Jensen and Mr. W. Dolinger are much appreciated. The patient, skillful, and artistic assistance of Dr. D. L. Thorn and Dr. D. R. Corbin in creating several of the graphics used here is gratefully acknowledged.

Abstract

A Maxwell's Demon approach to catalysis, in which individual molecules can be distinguished, has come closer to reality in recent years. Two new approaches to catalyst synthesis are described that are leading the way to catalyst design. The Figure shown n-octane proceeding through the 8-ring window of zeolite A toward the iron active site for oxidation. The relative size of the window and alkaline causes selectivity for oxidation towards the end of the chain.

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