Lamellar semiconductor–organic nanostructures from self-assembled templates

Authors

  • Paul Osenar,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and Materials Research Laboratory University of Illinois Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
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  • Paul V. Braun,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and Materials Research Laboratory University of Illinois Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
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  • Prof. Samuel I. Stupp

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Chemistry, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Chemistry Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and Materials Research Laboratory University of Illinois Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
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  • This work was supported in part by a grant from the Department of Energy Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials. Partial support was also received from the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, in particular through the use of its Visualization Facility and a research assistantship for P. V. Braun. Molecular graphics assistance from Milan Keser, of our laboratory, is greatly appreciated.

Abstract

A templating synthesis of nanocomposite materials with lamellar morphology is described in which the unique structure of the polyol amphiphiles—leading to a highly stabilized lamellar mesophase—is exploited. The use of these mesophases in the formation of semiconducting–organic nanocomposites that copy the symmetry and spacing of the mesophase is demonstrated. It is suggested that the regular arrangement of organic and semiconducting components on the molecular length scale could lead to novel optoelectronic materials.

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