Surface chemistry of Luminescent Silicon Nanocrystallites

Authors

  • Prof. Michael J. Sailor,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego La Jolla, CA 92093-0358(USA)
    • Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego La Jolla, CA 92093-0358(USA)
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    • was born in Redwood City, California, in 1961. He attended Harvey Mudd College, where he received his B.S. in 1983, and Northwestern University, where he was awarded his Ph. D. in 1988 for work on organometallic metal clusters. He began his faculty appointment in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of California at San Diego in 1990, becoming Associate Professor in 1994 and Full Professor in 1996. He has been the recipient of several awards and was also an Alfred P Sloan research fellow (1994–1995). Professor Sailor is a member of the Executive Steering Committee of the UCSD Materials Science Division and serves on the Editorial Boards of Advanced Materials and Chemtracts–Inorganic Chemistry. His current research interests focus on the synthesis and study of materials with interesting electronic properties, for example, nanophase semiconductors, thin semiconductor films, and electronically conductive polymers.

  • Dr. Eric J. Lee

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego La Jolla, CA 92093-0358(USA)
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    • was born in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, in 1963. He received his B.S. in chemistry from Stanford University in 1985 and his Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1994 for work on electron and energy transfer in inorganic complexes, polymers, and semiconductor nanocrystallites. From 1994 to 1997 he was a post-doctoral fellow in Michael Sailor's group at the University of California at San Diego working on the surface derivatization and spectroscopy of porous silicon. Currently he is at the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, California, studying the surface chemistry of magnetic materials.


Abstract

The rational modification of porous and single-crystalline silico surfaces is of particular interest for technologies based on silicon. Porous silicon, such as the layer shown in the Figure, has many potential technological applications. In this review of chemical reactions developed for Si surface modification, both extensions of the chemistry of molecular Si compounds to surfaces and new surface chemistry are treated.

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