Enzymatic Synthesis and Nanostructural Control of Gallium Oxide at Low Temperature

Authors

  • D. Kisailus,

    1. Materials Research Laboratory and Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies and, the California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9610, USA
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  • J. H. Choi,

    1. Materials Research Laboratory, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9610, USA
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  • J. C. Weaver,

    1. Materials Research Laboratory and Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies and, the California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9610, USA
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  • W. Yang,

    1. Materials Research Laboratory and Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies and, the California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9610, USA
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  • D. E. Morse

    1. Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Marine Science Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9610, USA
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  • We thank Professor Tzi Sum Andy Hor (National University of Singapore) for his insightful suggestions. This work was supported by grants from the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DE-FG03-02ER46006), NASA (NAG1-01-003 and NCC-1-02037), the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies through grant DAAD19-03D-0004 from the U.S. Army Research Office, the NOAA National Sea Grant College Program, U.S. Department of Commerce (NA36RG0537, Project R/MP-92) through the California Sea Grant College System, and the MRSEC Program of the National Science Foundation under award No. DMR-96-32716 to the UCSB Materials Research Laboratory.

Abstract

original image

Nanostructural control of gallium oxide formation is achieved at low temperatures by the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis and polycondensation of gallium oxide precursors. Filaments of silicatein, a hydrolase originally discovered in a marine sponge, catalyze the hydrolysis of gallium(III) nitrate, producing oriented nanocrystallites along the length of the filaments (see Figure) in the absence of acid or alkali.

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