Growth of Silicon Oxide in Thin Film Block Copolymer Scaffolds

Authors

  • D. H. Kim,

    1. Silvio O. Conte National Center for Polymer Research, Polymer Science and Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Amherst, MA 01003, USA
    2. Current address: Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, D55128 Mainz, Germany.
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  • X. Jia,

    1. Silvio O. Conte National Center for Polymer Research, Polymer Science and Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Amherst, MA 01003, USA
    2. Current address: Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
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  • Z. Lin,

    1. Silvio O. Conte National Center for Polymer Research, Polymer Science and Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Amherst, MA 01003, USA
    2. Current address: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
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  • K. W. Guarini,

    1. IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598, USA
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  • T. P. Russell

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  • We are grateful for the financial support of the Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences under contract DE-FG02-96ER45612, National Science Foundation under the partnership in Nanotechnology (CTR-9871782), and NSF-sponsored Material Research Science and Engineering Center at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Abstract

Thin films of asymmetric diblock copolymers have been used as scaffolds to define an ordered array of nanometer-scale reaction vessels in which high density arrays of silicon oxide nanostructures (see Figure) are produced by exposure to silicon tetrachloride. Such site-specific silicon oxide nanostructures could have widespread uses for sensory and optoelectronic applications.

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