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Advanced Materials

Site-Selective Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

Authors

  • M. S. Raghuveer,

    1. Materials Science and Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA
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  • A. Kumar,

    1. Materials Science and Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA
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  • M. J. Frederick,

    1. Materials Science and Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA
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  • G. P. Louie,

    1. Materials Science and Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA
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  • P. G. Ganesan,

    1. Materials Science and Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA
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  • G. Ramanath

    1. Materials Science and Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA
    2. International Center for Young Scientists, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
    3. Max Planck Institut für Festkörperforschung, Heisenbergstraße 1, Stuttgart D-70569, Germany
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  • The authors gratefully acknowledge Dr. J. S. Dordick for valuable discussions and Dr. T. Nakayama for carrying out micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements. The work was supported by the NSF (ECS 424322, DMR 9984478 and Rensselaer's NSEC), an Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship, and the Bergmann Award provided by the US–Israel Binational Science Foundation. Supporting Information is available online from Wiley InterScience or from the author.

Abstract

Site-selective functionalization of nano- or macroscopic segments of carbon nanotubes is accomplished using focused ion beams followed by site-selective derivatization of the segments with nanostructures and biomolecules (see Figure). Such hybrid nanostructures open up new possibilities for nanoscale addressing, fingerprinting, recognition, and separation.

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