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Three-Dimensional Microfluidic Tissue-Engineering Scaffolds Using a Flexible Biodegradable Polymer

Authors

  • C. J. Bettinger,

    1. MEMS Technology Group, Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, 555 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    2. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Room E25-342, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
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  • E. J. Weinberg,

    1. MEMS Technology Group, Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, 555 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    2. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Room E25-342, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
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  • K. M. Kulig,

    1. Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA
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  • J. P. Vacanti,

    1. Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA
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  • Y. Wang,

    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 313 Ferst Drive, BME 2113, Atlanta, GA 30332-0535, USA
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  • J. T. Borenstein,

    1. MEMS Technology Group, Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, 555 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
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  • R. Langer

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Room E25-342, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
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  • The authors acknowledge the following: The MEMS Technology Group at the Draper Laboratory for direct funding and use of facilities; Kevin King, Brian Orrick, Mert Prince, Connie Cardoso, and Ashish Misra for their contributions in microfabrication and cell culture; and Mohammad Kaazempur-Mofrad for his assistance in the design and simulation of the constant shear networks. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (Grants HL 060435 and DE 013023). The views expressed are not endorsed by the sponsor. Additional funding provided by DL-H-550154. The content of this paper does not necessarily reflect the position or the policy of the government, and no official endorsement should be inferred. Supporting Information is available online from Wiley InterScience or from the author.

Abstract

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Three-dimensional microfluidic networks using a flexible biodegradable polymer have been fabricated using modified microfabrication processes tailored specifically for poly(glycerol-co-sebacate). A model hepatocyte cell line (HepG2) is seeded and perfused in the microfluidic networks to demonstrate cell viability and function, which is maintained in long-term perfusion culture (see Figure; scale bar is 50 μm). The seeded, fully degradable device can potentially be integrated into a patient's existing vasculature in order to restore organ function.

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