Spontaneous Formation of Blood-Compatible Surfaces on Hydrophobic Polymers: Surface Enrichment of a Block Copolymer with a Water-Soluble Block

Authors

  • A. Oyane,

    1. Nanotechnology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 5, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565, Japan
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  • T. Ishizone,

    1. Department of Organic and Polymeric Materials, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-H-119, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552, Japan
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  • M. Uchida,

    1. Institute for Human Science and Biomedical Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566, Japan
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  • K. Furukawa,

    1. Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan
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  • T. Ushida,

    1. Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan
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  • H. Yokoyama

    1. Nanotechnology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 5, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565, Japan
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  • We acknowledge the technical support of Mr. K. Ogawa and Mr. M. Kimura, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, in preparing the platelet adhesion assays.

Abstract

original image

A polymer surface with excellent blood compatibility has been produced via spontaneous surface segregation of a block copolymer. The water-soluble polymer block (PME3MA) spontaneously segregates into hydrophobic and hydrophilic environments (see Figure), causing the blocks to expel biological substances including proteins, cells and platelets via flexible chain motion.

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