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Advanced Materials

UV Electroluminescence Emission from ZnO Light-Emitting Diodes Grown by High-Temperature Radiofrequency Sputtering

Authors

  • J.-H. Lim,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712, Republic of Korea
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  • C.-K. Kang,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712, Republic of Korea
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  • K.-K. Kim,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712, Republic of Korea
    2. Present address: Photonic Program Team, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Suwaon 440-600, Republic of Korea
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  • I.-K. Park,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712, Republic of Korea
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  • D.-K. Hwang,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712, Republic of Korea
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  • S.-J. Park

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712, Republic of Korea
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Abstract

A UV-light-emitting homojunction ZnO LED is grown by radiofrequency sputtering at high temperature, improving the structural, electrical, and optical properties of the n- and p-type ZnO layers. The figure shows a comparison of the electroluminescence spectra of A) a p–n homojunction ZnO LED and B) a ZnO LED with Mg0.1Zn0.9O layers used as energy barrier layers. Such materials are of interest for their potential use in long-lifetime solid-state lighting, high-density information storage, secure communication, and chemical/biological-agent monitoring.

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