Advanced Materials

Biologically Active Protein Nanoarrays Generated Using Parallel Dip-Pen Nanolithography

Authors

  • S. W. Lee,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Institute for Nanotechnology, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3113, USA
    2. Current Address: School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Yeungnam University, Kyongsan 712-469, Korea
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  • B.-K. Oh,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Institute for Nanotechnology, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3113, USA
    2. Current Address: Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, CPO Box 1142, Seoul, Korea
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  • R. G. Sanedrin,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Institute for Nanotechnology, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3113, USA
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  • K. Salaita,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Institute for Nanotechnology, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3113, USA
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  • T. Fujigaya,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Institute for Nanotechnology, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3113, USA
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  • C. A. Mirkin

    1. Department of Chemistry and Institute for Nanotechnology, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3113, USA
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  • C. A. M. acknowledges NSF, AFSOR, DARPA, and NIH for supporting this work. C. A. M. is grateful for a NIH Director's Pioneer Award. S. W. L and B.-K. O acknowledge Korea Research Foundation Grant funded by Korea Government for support of a postdoctoral fellowship (grant no. M01-2003-000-20278-0, M01-2003-000-20168-0). Supporting Information is available online from Wiley InterScience or from the author.

Abstract

Amine-active N-hydroxysuccinimide-terminated alkyl thiol templates are generated using parallel dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) and are used to covalently couple protein A/G. The protein arrays generated (see figure) are used to capture antibodies through affinity binding, while preserving their biological recognition properties. The versatility of the parallel DPN method for making many similar structures in a relatively high-throughput manner (14 000 dots in 10 min) is described.

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