Isotopically Enriched 10BN Nanotubes

Authors

  • J. Yu,

    1. Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
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  • Y. Chen,

    1. Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
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  • R. G. Elliman,

    1. Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
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  • M. Petravic

    1. Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
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  • The authors gratefully thank Dr. John Fitz Gerald and the staff at the Electron Microscopy Unit for their help in assisting microscopy analyses. We also acknowledge Dr. Steve Harris and Dr. Robert C. Singleterry, Jr. for stimulating discussions. This work is, in part, supported by the Australian Research Council under a Discovery Research grant.

Abstract

original image

Isotopically enriched 10BN nanotubes, shown in the figure, have been produced for the first time. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis confirms a high content of 10B in the nanotubes. The 10BN nanotubes are lightweight, have excellent mechanical properties, a stronger resistance to oxidation than carbon nanotubes, and superior radiation shielding properties, offering a multifunctional material with promising space radiation shielding applications.

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