Preparation of Biocompatible Magnetite Nanocrystals for In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Detection of Cancer

Authors

  • F. Q. Hu,

    1. Key Laboratory of Colloid, Interface Science and Chemical Thermodynamics, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, P.R. China
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  • L. Wei,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071, P.R. China
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  • Z. Zhou,

    1. Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Cancer Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021, P.R. China
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  • Y. L. Ran,

    1. Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Cancer Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021, P.R. China
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  • Z. Li,

    1. Key Laboratory of Colloid, Interface Science and Chemical Thermodynamics, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, P.R. China
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  • M. Y. Gao

    1. Key Laboratory of Colloid, Interface Science and Chemical Thermodynamics, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, P.R. China
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  • Funding was provided jointly by an 863 project (2002AA302201) and a NSFC project (20225313). L.W. was financially supported by CAS through a key project (No.: kjcx2-sw-h12-03). Supporting Information is available online from Wiley InterScience or from the author.

Abstract

original image

Biocompatible Fe3O4 magnetic nanocrystals with reactive moieties on the surface can be prepared via a “one-pot” reaction and used straightforwardly in cancer detection by being coupled with a specific cancer-targeting antibody. It is demonstrated that the as-prepared Fe3O4 nanocrystals can potentially be used as effective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents for cancer diagnosis (see figure).

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