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Amplified Photochemistry with Slow Photons

Authors

  • J. I. L. Chen,

    1. Materials Chemistry Research Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6, Canada
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  • G. von Freymann,

    1. Materials Chemistry Research Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6, Canada
    2. Institut für Nanotechnologie, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe in der Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft, 76021 Karlsruhe, Germany
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  • S. Y. Choi,

    1. Materials Chemistry Research Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6, Canada
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  • V. Kitaev,

    1. Materials Chemistry Research Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6, Canada
    2. Chemistry Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, 75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5, Canada
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  • G. A. Ozin

    1. Materials Chemistry Research Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6, Canada
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  • G. A. O. is Government of Canada Research Chair in Materials Chemistry. J. I. L. C. and G. A. O. thank the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and University of Toronto for financial support. G. von F. acknowledges support from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft under projects FR 1671/2-1 and FR 1671/4-3 (Emmy-Noether program), and V. K. thanks Wilfrid Laurier University. The authors are grateful to H. Míguez for initiating this project and helpful discussions, S. Petrov for XRD analysis and M. Mamak for TEM images. Supporting information is available online from Wiley InterScience or from the author.

Abstract

Slow photons in photonic crystals are shown to optically amplify the photoactivity of anatase TiO2 in an inverse opal structure. An enhancement in TiO2 absorption as a result of slow photons leads to a larger population of electron–hole pairs and faster degradation of organic molecules. A remarkable twofold enhancement is achieved (see figure) when the energy of the slow photons is optimized with respect to the absorption edge of anatase.

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