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Advanced Materials

Low-Temperature Fusion of Polymeric Nanostructures Using Carbon Dioxide

Authors

  • Y. Yang,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
    2. Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for Affordable Nanoengineering of Polymeric Biomedical Devices, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
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  • D. Liu,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
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  • Y. Xie,

    1. Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for Affordable Nanoengineering of Polymeric Biomedical Devices, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
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  • L. J. Lee,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
    2. Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for Affordable Nanoengineering of Polymeric Biomedical Devices, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
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  • D. L. Tomasko

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
    2. Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for Affordable Nanoengineering of Polymeric Biomedical Devices, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
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  • This work was partially supported by the NSF-sponsored Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for Affordable Nanoengineering of Polymeric Biomedical Devices (NSEC-CANPBD) at The Ohio State University. Supporting Information is available online from Wiley InterScience or from the author.

Abstract

A low-temperature fusion method for preparing polymeric nanostructures based on low-pressure CO2-enhanced chain mobility at the nanoscale is presented. Characterization of the structures reveals a pressure-tunable rubbery layer on the surface. The successful fusion of polymeric nanostructures (see figure) at temperatures below the bulk glass-transition temperature of the polymer is demonstrated. The technique has potential for the assembly of 3D micro/nanoscale polymeric devices for biomedical applications.

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