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Self-Lubricating Nano-Ball-Bearings

Authors

  • C. M. Brick,

    1. Dow Corning Corporation, Corporate Center, PO Box 994, Midland, MI 48686-0994, USA
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  • E. R. Chan,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136, USA
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  • S. C. Glotzer,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136, USA
    2. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136, USA
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  • J. C. Marchal,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136, USA
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  • D. C. Martin,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136, USA
    2. The Macromolecular Science and Engineering Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136, USA
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  • R. M. Laine

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136, USA
    2. The Macromolecular Science and Engineering Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136, USA
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  • ERC and SCG thank the National Science Foundation (NSF) for financial support under grant DMR-0103399. DCM also acknowledges partial support from the NSF. RML and CMB thank the NSF for an IGERT grant for partial support of this work, AFRL at Edwards AFB and Guardian Industries for partial support. We would especially like to thank C. James and J. Chen for reproducing key results and for video images of the mechanical deformation associated with the melting processes. We also thank Dr. R. Vaia for pointing out the superlattice modeling and melting studies. Supporting Information is available online from Wiley InterScience or from the author.

Abstract

original image

Friedel–Crafts alkylation of octaphenyloctasilsesquioxane (OPS) introduces a hydrocarbon layer around the rigid OPS core (see figure). Although periodic order is maintained even in the melt, as determined from X-ray diffraction measurements, this layer provides access to low-melting solids for butyl, hexyl, octyl, and decyl substituents. Because the alkyl groups interdigitate, the butyl and hexyl melts are stable to temperatures of ca. 400 °C, which is ca. 100 °C higher than the octyl and decyl compounds.

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