Click Chemistry: Versatility and Control in the Hands of Materials Scientists

Authors

  • H. Nandivada,

    1. Departments of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, and Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, 2300 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA)
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  • X. Jiang,

    1. Departments of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, and Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, 2300 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA)
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  • J. Lahann

    1. Departments of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, and Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, 2300 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA)
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  • J.L. gratefully acknowledges support from the NSF in form of a CAREER grant (DMR-0449462).

Abstract

The increasing need for materials with tightly controlled structures will continue to fuel the induction of synthetic organic concepts into materials science. One powerful example is the embracement of “click chemistry” by the materials science community. Because of their high selectivity, near-perfect reliability, high yields, and exceptional tolerance towards a wide range of functional groups and reaction conditions click reactions have recently attracted increased attention, specifically for use in polymer synthesis as well as for the modification of surfaces and nanometer- and mesoscale structures. As outlined in this Review article, click chemistry, such as the CuI-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and the Diels–Alder reaction, presents a synthetic concept that lends itself superbly to the controlled preparation of multifunctional materials.

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