Advanced Materials

Influence of Plasma Stimulation on Si Nanowire Nucleation and Orientation Dependence

Authors

  • P. Aella,

    1. School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (USA)
    2. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Science and Engineering of Materials Graduate Program, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (USA)
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  • S. Ingole,

    1. School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (USA)
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  • W. T. Petuskey,

    1. School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (USA)
    2. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Science and Engineering of Materials Graduate Program, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (USA)
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  • S. T. Picraux

    1. Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (USA)
    2. School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (USA)
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  • This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (DMR-0413523) and by the U.S. Department of Energy, Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, at Los Alamos National Laboratory (Contract W-7405-ENG-36).

Abstract

Silicon nanowires are grown epitaxially on Si (100) surfaces using thermal (a) and rf plasma excitation (b) for vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) growth. Plasma excitation at low growth temperatures promotes the nucleation of smaller diameter [110] oriented Si nanowires and is attributed to a plasma-induced increase in silicon chemical potential; it also increases low temperature nanowire growth rates (see figure). The rate limiting step in VLS growth here is due to silicon incorporation at the vapor-liquid interface. Plasma excitation enables additional control over nanowire orientation.

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